From the Ontario Ministry of Education's website:

Vibrant communities and a prosperous society are built on the foundation of a strong education system. Today, Ontario's publicly funded education system - acknowledged as one of the best in the world - partners with parents, guardians and communities to develop graduates who are personally successful, economically productive and actively engaged citizens. We now have more high school graduates than ever before, and more students are meeting the high provincial academic standards than were a decade ago. Our graduates are also entering a world that is more competitive, globally connected and technologically engaged than in any other period in history. With a track record of success that we can build on, and with the opportunities available in a more interconnected world, the time has come to aim even higher.


That is why in fall 2013, individuals and organizations across the province came together to consider and discuss the skills and knowledge Ontario learners will need in the future. The government received input from representatives within the education system, including parents and students, teachers, support staff and school and system leaders, as well as input from individuals and groups outside the education sector, including businesses and non-profit organizations. Achieving Excellence is the result of their feedback.

The Western Network for Digital Education and Research (WNDER)

The Western Network for Digital Education and Research (WNDER) is comprised of researchers, staff, graduate students, and librarians at Western University who seek to better understand the impacts of new technologies upon education. Our research encompasses all forms of educational technology, within the classroom and in online settings. We are interested in exploring new ways to deliver education to increasingly diverse communities of learners and in measuring the impact and outcomes of such technologies. Through eLearning, we seek to nurture innovation in education and to evaluate the efficacy and influence of instructional technology.

Membership in this group is free and open to all faculty, staff, and graduate students at Western University. Join us!

Welcome to the Education Library!

The Education Library is located in the north east corner of Western's Faculty of Education between the Student Council Office and The Blackboard Café . The Education Library's unique round shape and domed roof make it very easy to locate. The library has three floors of teaching and research resources so come on in and browse through our distinct collections. Got a question about our collections or our services? Check with the friendly and helpful library staff at the Services Desk. We are here to help you!


The Academic Librarians at the Education Library, Christena McKillop and Denise Horoky, have created a series of three "Getting Started" videos.

These short instructional videos (4 minutes or less) are available on the Education Library's website and are also linked here for your convenient viewing (so get your favourite beverage, settle into your favourite chair and ENJOY!)


1. Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools

2. Education Library Database Searching

3. Education Library - Finding Journal Titles and Articles Using the Library Catalogue

The School Board-University Research Exchange (SURE) Network

Are you a graduate student or a teacher candidate who is interested in teacher-based research? Are you looking for opportunities to collaborate and network with teachers, librarians, school administrators, and school board researchers?

The School Board-University Research Exchange (SURE) Network is a community for educational researchers that offers a space for teachers, researchers, librarians and administrators to discuss ideas and promote research collaboration with one another.

Denise Horoky, Research and Instructional Services Librarian at the Education Library, worked with the fabulous SURE Network team of volunteers to create one of the research-to-practice videos found on the SURE Network website. All of the SURE Network videos can be found HERE!

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

This Blog is written primarily for faculty and graduate students at Western's Faculty of Education. The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts and you may also want to see the work we are doing on those other social media platforms.

The Education Library's core mission when using any kind of social media is to effectively and efficiently connect our resources, collections and services to our students and researchers ~ have a look!

Copyright at Western University Information

Western University has a new copyright information page.

All questions regarding copyright at Western University should be directed to copyright@uwo.ca

The Education Library is extremely proud to support The 2014 Robert Macmillan Graduate Research in Education Symposium (GRiES) events on Thursday April 10 at Western's Faculty of Education.

We have created a book display of current research resources on the main floor of the Education Library. We have also created a current research resources bibliography. Finally, we are using our Facebook and Twitter pages to showcase a variety of research resources that may be of value to our Education graduate students.

Easter Long Weekend

The Education Library is CLOSED on April 18, 19 and 20 for the Easter Long Weekend. We re-open on Monday April 21 with regular hours.

News from CMEC

Provincial and territorial ministers of education will be in Edmonton, Alberta, on February 24, 2014, for the Third High-Level Consultation on Education Collaboration between the Provinces and Territories of Canada and the People's Republic of China (3HLC).

The Honourable Jeff Johnson, Chair of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC), and Minister of Education for Alberta, will lead the CMEC delegation. The Chinese delegation will be led by the Honourable Li Weihong, Vice Minister of Education for the People's Republic of China.

The 3HLC will promote dialogue on a variety of education issues and facilitate enhanced collaboration and engagement between the education sectors of the provinces and territories and the People's Republic of China. A summary of discussions will be released following the meeting.

Welcome and Welcome Back!

Welcome to the Winter 2014 term. We look forward to working with you. Here are the Education Library's Hours of Opening for this term.

Getting Started ~ Summon Search Engine on the Western Libraries' Website

Summon is a simple and fast search engine that will discover content from Western Libraries' vast collection of books, journal articles and other formats for virtually any topic using a single search box from the Western Libraries' website. Our website starts as a default to the Summon search box. Here is more information about Summon.

The start of this new Winter 2014 term is a good time to have a(nother) look at this very useful handout for graduate students. It is written by the Education Library's academic librarians to help graduate students get started on their papers, literature reviews, annotated bibliographies and research.

The Journal Citation Reports/JCR Web is a resource tool for journal evaluation, using citation data drawn from over 8,400 journals.

The JCR, via ISI Web of Knowledge, is the only source of citation data on journals, and includes virtually all specialties in the areas of science, technology, and social sciences.

The Journal Citation Reports/JCR via Web of Knowledge can show you: journal impact factors, highest impact journals, most frequently used journals, hottest journals and largest journals.

Getting Started ~ Need to know if a journal is peer-reviewed or not?

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb is listed under U in the Databases by Title List on the Western Libraries' website.

Getting Started ~ Education Research Databases

Looking for research journal articles for your assignments, funding requests, literature reviews, annotated bibliographies and/or upcoming papers?

As a student a Western University you have online access to hundreds of research databases and full-text journal articles.

As a Faculty of Education student you may be most interested in the education-related research databases. Start your literature review in one of these education research databases:

CBCA Education (for Canadian/Ontario education related journal articles)

ERIC (PLEASE NOTE: There are ongoing access problems with the ERIC database. Some PDF documents (e.g., those identified with an ED number) may be temporarily not available in full-text online format - please talk to the Education academic librarian if you need these documents.

ProQuest Education Journals

Professional Development Collection

All education graduate students should also use the Dissertations and Theses database for a thorough literature review.

And, for our Counselling/Educational Psychology students: PsycINFO

The Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™ database focuses on Canadian information in the field of education. It's the perfect source for those interested in teaching, educational research, policy and educational leadership/administration in Canada.

CBCA Education is a ProQuest product so the search screen will look similar to the ERIC database and to the ProQuest Education Journals database.

It is easy to get started! Start at the Western Libraries homepage.

If you are working off campus you must type in your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account).
Click on the RESEARCH tab along the top of the Western Libraries homepage.
Click on DATABASES.
Click on C.
Click on CBCA Education.
(NB: You may want to bookmark this link for later easy access)
Start typing in (and combining) your keywords.

Remember: Most (but not all) articles will be available to you to read online in full text at your convenience.

Getting Started ~ Consult the Western Libraries' Program Guides

When planning your papers, assignments, annotated bibliographies and literature reviews you will find the Western Libraries' Program Guides (especially the ones created for Education Graduate students) a great place to start.

Getting Started ~ Help with APA Style®

Using APA Style? We strongly urge you to start with this APA STYLE Help Page (it has FAQs, videos, direct connection to their Ask an Expert service, and a dedicated Blog!) and follow APA Style (@APA_Style) on Twitter.

Graduate Students ~ Education Library Research Consultations Available

Education Library Research Support for Graduate Students: Telephone, Online, Email or In-Person Research Consultations are available. We are here to help you!

Contact the Education academic librarians by email at eduref@uwo.ca to ask a research question or to make an appointment for a personalized research consultation.

The Education Library's Email reference services is especially helpful to graduate students taking online courses and who are not able to come into the Faculty of Education for personalized consultations.

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

This Blog is written primarily for faculty and graduate students at Western's Faculty of Education. However, you may also want to see the work we are doing on other social media platforms. The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts.

The Education Library's core mission when using any kind of social media is to effectively and efficiently connect our resources and services to our students and researchers ~ have a look!

Getting Started ~ Contact Us

We make it very easy to Contact Us at the Education Library.

Getting Started ~ Education Library's Short Instructional Videos

The Academic Librarians have created two "Getting Started" videos. These short instructional videos (4 minutes or less) are available on the Education Library's website and are also linked here for your convenient viewing:


1. Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools

2. Education Library Database Searching


Our THIRD video is coming soon (hopefully this week!)

Copyright at Western University Information Page

Western University has a new copyright information page. All questions regarding copyright at Western University should be directed to copyright@uwo.ca.

The Librarian is reading...

Storytelling for Social Justice: Connecting Narrative and the Arts in Antiracist Teaching by Lee Anne Bell. The CALL NUMBER for this book is LB1042.B44 2010 and it can found downstairs in the Education Library's lower level STACKS.

Welcome and Welcome Back!

Welcome to the Winter 2014 term. Here are the Education Library's Hours of Opening for this term.

Holiday Hiatus

The Education Library Blog is now on a holiday hiatus until January 2014. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

The End of an Era for Academia.edu and Other Academic Networks?

Michael Clarke writes this on The Scholarly Kitchen Blog: What's Hot and Cooking In Scholarly Publishing:

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that Elsevier has issued a sweeping series of Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) take down notices regarding Elsevier-published content to Academia.edu, a file-sharing network for researchers and other academics.


Read the rest of this very timely blog post!

The Librarian is reading...

December and Holiday Hours of Opening

The Education Library changes hours of opening in mid-December.


NEW ~ Copyright @ Western Website

Please have a careful look at the new website Copyright@Western. This new website includes an important message from the Provost [pdf] regarding copyright at Western University.

The rules of scholarly publishing are changing.


Funding agencies are requiring that scholarly output be freely available. When you publish your research, how can you best satisfy the competing demands of publisher contracts and your funding agreements?


Please join us for a one-hour Author Rights Workshop/Q&A to be held January 14, 2014 at 2:30 pm in the Library Instruction Room in The Map & Data Centre at The D. B. Weldon Library.

Following the workshop there will be an opportunity to ask specific questions and explore author rights tools.

We would pleased if you could join us in this important discussion. However, seating is limited so we are asking you to please register in advance.

FREE subscription to University Affairs magazine

Faculty, staff and graduate students can subscribe to University Affairs magazine at no charge. The only requirement is that the subscription must be sent to a university campus address.

University Affairs is the most trusted source of news, information and opinion about higher education in Canada. Covering the university scene for over 50 years, University Affairs is also the country's largest source of career advertising aimed at the academic community.

To get your FREE SUBSCRIPTION (a $39 value), simply subscribe through the University Affairs website.

While on the site, also check out the Career Resources section. It has a lot of helpful information aimed at graduate students and faculty, such as Careers Café, a popular blog for academic job seekers. You can also sign up for customized job e-mail alerts, listen to podcasts or view videos.


Did we mention it is FREE if the subscription is sent to a university campus address?

This message is from Robin Keirstead, University Archivist and Acting University Librarian:

I want to advise you that in preparation for a new copyright information and resources website, we are taking down the copyright pages currently available via the Policies link in the footer of Western Libraries' homepage (www.lib.uwo.ca/copyright).


Content on this page will be replaced with a 'site under construction' message, with an indication that the new copyright website will be available before the end of the year and that in the interim any copyright related questions can be directed to the copyright@uwo.ca email address.

This change is being made as a result of several recent developments with respect to copyright, both on campus and nationally, as well as a specific request from members of the community concerned about the current wording, including. for example, the reference to contacting Access Copyright for direction. The new copyright website, when launched, will support Western's focus on enhancing copyright literacy.


Any questions should be directed to Tom Adam at copyright@uwo.ca.

Engaging our Community! Play, Learn, Share


The Technology in Education Symposium (TIES) is back, bigger and better than ever. This two-day event on March 27 and March 28, 2014 will feature research paper presentations, lightning rounds, hands-on workshops, posters and demonstrations, and a student panel on the uses of instructional technology.

TIES 2.0 is open to faculty, librarians, staff, postgrads, and graduate students from across all disciplines at Western and its affiliates.

We are seeking proposals for research-based paper presentations, roundtables, lightening sessions, and posters, as well as for workshop presenters, on a wide range of subjects, but with a particular focus upon "playing" (i.e., experimenting), "learning" (on the part of both students and instructors), and "sharing." Paper sessions will address research on eLearning and instructional technology to engage students and enrich learning. In addition, we are requesting proposals for concurrent workshops focusing on practical aspects of using educational technologies. Share your expertise and be a part of this exciting event!


Interdisciplinary Research and the Academic Career Panel Discussion

Your research and scholarship cross disciplines. What impact does this have on tenure and promotion? Experienced colleagues will discuss their strategies in the face of challenges such as: what and where you publish; graduate supervisions; particular concerns with cross appointments and responsibilities to two areas.

Please join the discussion:

Tuesday, December 10, 2013
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Teaching Support Centre (TSC)
The D.B. Weldon Library, Room 121


Our panelists include:

Dr. Lorelei Lingard, Director, Centre for Education Research & Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry

Dr. Carol Jones, Associate Dean, Graduate & Post Doctoral Study, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Dr. Andrew Nelson, Associate Dean, Research & Operations, Faculty of Social Science, Department of Anthropology

Dr. Jacquie Burkell, Assistant Dean, Research, Faculty of Information and Media Studies

Dr. Bryan Neff, Associate Dean, Research, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology

Contact Us

We make it very easy to Contact Us at the Education Library.

Western Cares Food Drive

The Western Cares Food Drive, in conjunction with the city-wide Business Cares Food Drive in support of the London and Area Food Bank has begun.

This year the campus drive is running from Monday, Dec. 2 to Monday, Dec. 16, 2013.

Thanks to your support, last year Western and its affiliate university colleges combined with a wide variety of local organizations and businesses to collect a record 259,000 lb. of food. We'd like to beat that this year, but in light of the challenging economic times in London and area, your support will be more important than ever. The London and Area Food Bank provides emergency food items for 3,500 families monthly - 42% of them children - and more than 30 other social service agencies in the London area. Usage of the food bank has increased again this year.

We encourage you to bring in food donations (whatever is possible). Donation boxes are located in the Front Foyer of the Faculty of Education Building until Dec 16.

December and Holiday Hours of Opening

The Education Library changes hours of opening in mid-December. Full details are available here.

Scheduled Downtime for RACER

RACER (both staff and end-user interfaces) will be unavailable for 24 hours this weekend beginning at 4:00pm on Friday, December 6.

A notice to this effect has been placed on the RACER Sign In page as well as the InterLibrary Loans (ILL) Services home page on the Western Libraries`website.

Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

This article appeared in the May/June 2013 issue of the Journal of College Science Teaching (Volume 42, Issue Number 5).

Abstract:

Case study teaching has been extolled for its ability to engage students and develop critical-thinking skills, among other benefits. But there is a price to be paid: greater preparation time, student resistance to novel teaching methods, and a concern on the part of many teachers about content coverage. The latter is especially worrisome to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) instructors who equate coverage with learning. They rightfully point out that there are state and national standards that must be met, standardized exams that students must take, and prerequisites for advanced courses that must be satisfied. Here, Herreid and Schiller introduce flipped classroom. In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as homework is switched or flipped.

The journal article appeared in the July 2013 issue of Teaching of Psychology (Volume 40, Issue Number 3).

Abstract:

Undergraduate statistics courses are perceived as challenging by both students and instructors. Students' attitudes, motivation, math anxiety, and preparedness can negatively impact the student and instructor experience and have the potential to negatively impact student learning. This article describes an attempt to address some of these challenges through structural and procedural changes to an undergraduate statistics course that is required for social science majors. The traditional lecture/homework structure of the course was "flipped" so that the majority of basic knowledge acquisition moved out of the classroom, making room for interactive activities during class time. The described changes had a positive impact on students' attitudes toward the class and instructor as well as on students' performance in the class.

This article appeared in the Spring 2013 issue of the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences (Volume 105, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

"Flipping" the classroom employs easy-to-use, readily accessible technology in order to free class time from lecture. This allows for an expanded range of learning activities during class time. Using class time for active learning versus lecture provides opportunities for greater teacher-to-student mentoring, peer-to-peer collaboration and cross-disciplinary engagement. This review of literature addresses the challenges of engaging today's students in lecture-based classrooms and presents an argument for application of the "flipped classroom" model by educators in the disciplines of family and consumer sciences

Flipping the Classroom to Improve Student Performance and Satisfaction

This article appeared in the October 2013 issue of Journal of Nursing Education (Volume 52, Issue Number 10).

Abstract:

This study aimed to determine the effects of a flipped classroom (i.e., reversal of time allotment for lecture and homework) and innovative learning activities on academic success and the satisfaction of nursing students. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare three approaches to learning: traditional lecture only (LO), lecture and lecture capture back-up (LLC), and the flipped classroom approach of lecture capture with innovative classroom activities (LCI). Examination scores were higher for the flipped classroom LCI group (M = 81.89, SD = 5.02) than for both the LLC group (M = 80.70, SD = 4.25), p = 0.003, and the LO group (M = 79.79, SD = 4.51), p < 0.001. Students were less satisfied with the flipped classroom method than with either of the other methods (p < 0.001). Blending new teaching technologies with interactive classroom activities can result in improved learning but not necessarily improved student satisfaction.

Evidence on Flipped Classroom Is Still Coming In

This journal article appeared in the March 2013 issue of Educational Leadership (Volume 70, Issue Number 6).

Abstract:

Lectures aren't necessarily bad--they can be an effective way to help students acquire new knowledge. The problem with lectures is often a matter of pacing. That's why some teachers are now turning this model on its head, creating flipped or inverted classrooms in which they record lectures and post them online. Students watch the lectures at home, where they can speed through content they already understand or stop and review content they missed the first time the teacher discussed it. Here, Goodwin and Miller feature the benefits of flipped classrooms.

This journal article appeared in the November 2013 issue of IEEE Transactions on Education (Volume 56. Issue Number 4 )

Abstract:

An inverted, or flipped, classroom, where content delivery includes video lectures watched outside of the classroom, is a method that can free classroom time for learner-centered activities such as active and problem-based learning. This study compared the effectiveness of an inverted classroom to a traditional classroom in three areas: 1) content coverage; 2) student performance on traditional quizzes and exam problems; and 3) student observations and perception of the inverted classroom format. A control-treatment experiment comparing an inverted classroom to a traditional lecture-style format was used. The results show that: 1) the inverted classroom allowed the instructor to cover more material; 2) students participating in the inverted classroom performed as well or better on comparable quiz and exam questions and on open-ended design problems; and 3) while students initially struggled with the new format, they adapted quickly and found the inverted classroom format to be satisfactory and effective.

Educational Technologies to Support New Directions in Teaching Practice

This article appears in the December 2013 issue of International Journal of Information and Education Technology (Volume 3, Issue Number 6).

Abstract:

The advancement in ubiquitous computing has made the process of learning more accessible to many students, particularly those in geographically dispersed locations around the world. The recent introduction of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and other disruptive technologies into the eLearning landscape has also brought into question formerly held pedagogical notions and in many instances, heralded changes aligned with both student expectations and technological drivers. This transition has challenged not only teaching practices, but also the vehicle with which to deliver the learning content. The Learning Management System (LMS) has hitherto been a popular tool of use to deliver a range of, mostly static, learning artefacts in educational institutions, often as an "online" and "supplementary" medium to support face-to-face offerings. The LMS is now expected to align with emerging technological developments such as mobile computing and synchronous lecture engagement activities within the classroom environment. This paper explores the recent advancement of teaching practice and proposes methods by which the LMS can evolve to meet the needs and expectations of its users.

This journal article appears in the 2014 (no, not a typo) issue of Business Education & Accreditation (Volume 6, Issue Number 1),

Abstract:

A report on an introduction of a "flipped classroom" approach to lectures in a final-year actuarial course is presented. At the heart of the flipped classroom is moving the "delivery" of material outside of formal class time and using formal class time for students to undertake collaborative and interactive activities relevant to that material. Students were surveyed both at the start and end of the semester to obtain their views on lectures in general and the flipped classroom structure. After experiencing the entire course with this teaching style, student views became, on average, far more positive towards the flipped classroom approach.

Education Library Research Videos

The Academic Librarians have created two "Getting Started" videos. These short videos are available on the Education Library's website and are also linked here for your convenient viewing:


Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools


Education Library Database Searching

Does Criticisms Overcome the Praises of Journal Impact Factor?

This journal article appears in the May 2013 issue Asian Social Science (Volume 9, Issue Number 5).

Abstract:

Journal impact factor (IF) as a gauge of influence and impact of a particular journal comparing with other journals in the same area of research, reports the mean number of citations to the published articles in particular journal. Although, IF attracts more attention and being used more frequently than other measures, it has been subjected to criticisms, which overcome the advantages of IF. Critically, extensive use of IF may result in destroying editorial and researchers' behaviour, which could compromise the quality of scientific articles. Therefore, it is the time of the timeliness and importance of a new invention of journal ranking techniques beyond the journal impact factor.

Finding the Impact Factor for a Journal

The impact factor of a journal refers to the number of times the average article has been cited in a particular journal, over a particular period of time. The premise is that the more an article is cited, the more important it is; therefore, the more a journal publishes important (or highly cited articles), the more important that journal becomes, thus increasing the impact factor calculation. Journal Citation Reports is a database maintained by Web of Knowledge. It is important to note that an article must be cited in a journal indexed by Web of Knowledge to be included in an impact factor calculation.

Listed under J in the DATABASES BY TITLE list on the Western Libraries' website, Journal Citation Reports (JCR) is where you can find the impact factor for a particular journal.

This journal appeared in Online Information Review (Volume 36, Issue Number 3, 2012)

Abstract:

Purpose - Google Scholar has been increasingly used in the past six to seven years as a highly efficient information source and service by librarians and other information professionals. The problem is when Google Scholar is touted and used as a bibliometric/scientometric tool and resource in the assessment of the quantity (productivity) and quality (impact) of research publications, in formal and informal ways, for decisions related to tenure, promotion and grant applications of individual researchers and research groups, as well as in journal subscriptions and cancellations. This paper aims to examine this issue.

Design/methodology/approach - The paper discusses the use of Google Scholar for journal impact factors and the h-index in nationwide publishing assessments in academia. It focuses on the issues of access and excess in Google Scholar: the innate limits of Google Scholar and those imposed by its developers on the users.

Findings - The paper reveals that issues of access and excess in Google Scholar prevent the researchers from doing appropriate content analysis that the best librarians and other information professionals do systematically to discover the pros and cons of databases. The excess content grossly dilutes the originally worthy collection of scholarly publications. The accuracy, reliability and reproducibility are essential for realistic research assessment through the prism of the quantity (publication counts) and quality (citation counts) of scholarly works. Unfortunately the metadata created by Google Scholar is substandard, neither reliable nor reproducible and it distorts the metric indicators at the individual, corporate and journal levels.

Originality/value - The paper provides useful information on the use of Google Scholar for journal impact factors and the h-index in academic publishing.

This journal article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science (Volume 7, Issue Number 1).


Abstract:

An academic journal's impact factor (hereafter JIF) is an average measure of the citation count of individual articles published in that journal. JIF is used to assess merit, predict impact, and allocate resources, but the actual number of citations to individual articles is only modestly correlated with the JIFs of the journals in which they are published. We counted PsycInfo citations to 1,133 articles published in nine leading psychology journals (1996-2005). Both article length (r =.31) and reference list length (r = .41) predicted log-transformed citation counts better than JIF (r = .27). Articles with fewer graphs and more structural equation models were more frequently cited. Citation count was better predicted by a model based on article length and citation count rather than JIF. When JIF was used to predict citation count, the impact of women authors and social science research was underestimated. These findings distinguish impact in science, as measured by JIF, from actual impact in psychology, and they show the unintended consequences of using a measure of the former to predict the latter.

Relative Influence of Professional Counseling Journals

This article appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of Journal of Counseling and Development: JCD (Volume 89, Issue Number 4).

Abstract:

The authors used social network analysis of citation data to study the flow of information and relative influence of 17 professional counseling journals. Although the Journal of Counseling & Development ranked very highly in all measures of journal influence, several division journals emerged as key players in the flow of information within the counseling profession. Results highlight the many facets of journal influence and the fallacy of using single measures, such as journal impact factor, to rank professional counseling journals.

This article appeared in the November 2012 issue of Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Volume 63, Issue Number 11).

Abstract:

Historically, papers have been physically bound to the journal in which they were published; but in the digital age papers are available individually, no longer tied to their respective journals. Hence, papers now can be read and cited based on their own merits, independently of the journal's physical availability, reputation, or impact factor(IF). We compare the strength of the relationship between journals' IFs and the actual citations received by their respective papers from 1902 to 2009. Throughout most of the 20th century, papers' citation rates were increasingly linked to their respective journals' IFs. However, since 1990, the advent of the digital age, the relation between IFs and paper citations has been weakening. This began first in physics, a field that was quick to make the transition into the electronic domain. Furthermore, since 1990 the overall proportion of highly cited papers coming from highly cited journals has been decreasing and, of these highly cited papers, the proportion not coming from highly cited journals has been increasing. Should this pattern continue, it might bring an end to the use of the IF as a way to evaluate the quality of journals, papers, and researchers.

This journal article appeared in the November 2012 issue of Innovative Higher Education (Volume 37, Issue Number 5).

Abstract:

As publication pressure has increased in the world of higher education, more journals, books, and other publication outlets have emerged. Thus it is critical to develop clear criteria for effectively evaluating the quality of publication outlets. Without such criteria funding agencies and promotion committees are forced to guess at how to evaluate a scholar's portfolio. In this article, we explore the perils of evaluating journals based on a single quantitative measure (e.g., the Impact Factorrating of the Institute for Science Information). We then discuss key considerations for evaluating scholarship, including three main criteria: rigor, impact, and prestige. Finally, we conclude with examples of how these criteria could be applied in evaluating scholarship.

This journal article appeared in the July 2012 issue of English Teaching (Volume 11, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

The following narrative reflects on the dilemmas and problems faced by inexperienced researchers working within the field of education. Focusing on a research project completed in fulfilment of an MA in Teaching and Learning, the article recounts the decisions made by one emergent researcher and evaluates how far the chosen methods may have helped or hindered the exploration of reader-response theory in terms of its practical application to the teaching of A Level English Literature. In addition, the author highlights the possible benefits and difficulties encountered when applying the findings of small-scale studies to the teaching of English. Lastly, the article reemphasises the validity of action research projects and suggests the importance of maintaining a tradition of teacher-researchers in the secondary English classroom.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of European Journal of Teacher Education (Volume 36, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

There is much current debate about the purpose and usefulness of educational research and the perceived communication gap between teaching professionals and academic researchers. UK government intervention into initial teacher education has in recent decades contributed to this divide by favouring school-based training. The most common route into teaching in England remains, however, the Postgraduate Certificate in Education, provided by higher education institutions and therefore required to comply with the higher education qualifications framework. The majority of initial teacher education in England therefore lies at the cusp of these two worlds, pulled in apparently opposing directions. The 'teacher-as-researcher' movement is widely seen as a bridge spanning these tensions, though there is discussion about the quality of practitioner research as well as about the appropriateness of a rigorous academic approach for investigating practice. This article offers examples of the use of small-scale research projects as a valid means of 'discovery learning' in pre-service teacher education. It argues that induction into research techniques as a means of exploring practical challenges can lead to knowledge production and ownership.

New Book ~ Action research: a guide for the teacher researcher

This information is from the publisher's website:

A step-by-step guide to action research with a balanced coverage of qualitative and quantitative methods. Known for its practical, step-by-step guidance for teachers on how to do research in classrooms, Action Research: a Guide for the Teacher Researcher was born from the author's own experience working with teachers and principals. The author guides future educators through the action research process via numerous concrete illustrations; positioning it as a fundamental component of teaching, alongside curriculum development, assessment, and classroom management.

New Book ~ Living the questions: a guide for teacher-researchers

This information is from the publisher's website:

Teacher research is an extension of good teaching, observing students closely, analyzing their needs, and adjusting the curriculum to fit the needs of all. In this completely updated second edition of their definitive work, Ruth Shagoury and Brenda Miller Power present a framework for teacher research along with an extensive collection of narratives from teachers engaged in the process of designing and carrying out research projects to inform their instruction.
Living the Questions: A Guide for Teacher-Researchers (Second Edition) will take you step-by-step through the process of designing, implementing, and publishing your research. Along the way, it will introduce you to dozens of kindred spirits who are finding new passion for teaching by "living the questions" every day in their classrooms. You will be reminded of why you became a teacher yourself.

The Librarian is reading...

Dr. Alan Edmunds talk taking place on Wednesday, November 27th at 7:00 p.m. in the Faculty of Education's Community Room.

Teachers often report having difficulty "getting ahead" in their classroom, as they are too busy supervising children instead of focusing on the lessons they had prepared for the day. Dynamic Classroom Management (DCM) is a program designed to help teachers and students overcome this distraction by maintaining a positive learning environment within the classroom.

As a part of the Faculty of Education's Complimentary Community Speaker Series, we invite you to come and listen to Dr. Alan Edmunds' talk, Improving Student Behaviour One School at a Time Using Dynamic Classroom Management. During the talk, he will describe and discuss the principles that drive the success of DCM, as well as share the results reported by schools who have adopted the classroom management style.

This FREE public event (with FREE parking) will take place on Wednesday, November 27th at 7 p.m. in the Community Room (1139) at Western's Faculty of Education (1137 Western Road). Please join us!

Engaging our Community! Play, Learn, Share


The Technology in Education Symposium (TIES) is back, bigger and better than ever. This two-day event on March 27 and March 28, 2014 will feature research paper presentations, lightning rounds, hands-on workshops, posters and demonstrations, and a student panel on the uses of instructional technology. TIES 2.0 is open to faculty, librarians, staff, postgrads, and graduate students from across all disciplines at Western and its affiliates.

We are seeking proposals for research-based paper presentations, roundtables, lightening sessions, and posters, as well as for workshop presenters, on a wide range of subjects, but with a particular focus upon "playing" (i.e., experimenting), "learning" (on the part of both students and instructors), and "sharing." Paper sessions will address research on eLearning and instructional technology to engage students and enrich learning. In addition, we are requesting proposals for concurrent workshops focusing on practical aspects of using educational technologies. Share your expertise and be a part of this exciting event!


Are you a graduate student or a teacher candidate who is interested in teacher-based research? Are you looking for opportunities to collaborate and network with teachers, librarians, school administrators, and school board researchers?

The School Board-University Research Exchange (SURE) Network is a community for educational researchers that offers a space for teachers, researchers, librarians and administrators to discuss ideas and promote research collaboration with one another.

Join SURE's upcoming event, IGNITE: Research-to Practice Festival

Saturday November 23rd from 8:30 am - 2:00 pm at Western's Faculty of Education (event and parking is FREE)

This Research-to Practice Festival is a great opportunity for anyone looking to expand their thinking and share ideas with other researchers. Join us and meet other interesting and knowledgeable people in the field of teacher-based research.

Together, let's ignite our thinking about research!
Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
Everyone is welcome at this FREE event. Parking is also FREE.
Please join us! Register at ignite@uwo.ca

Don't call Tom Adam 'the copyright police.'

This fall, Adam was named project manager and special advisor to the provost on copyright. His job focuses on enhancing 'copyright literacy' across campus - especially among faculty and graduate students - as the university's current deal with Access Copyright nears expiration.

Western and Access Copyright, a not-for-profit organization representing copyright owners, continue to discuss the terms of an extension to the current deal that runs out at year's end. Simultaneously, the university must make plans in case a deal never materializes.

Enter Adam - the university's official copyright educator, facilitator and champion. But he's no enforcer.


Read the entire Western News article HERE.

COMING SOON! New Copyright Information and Resources Website

This message is from Robin Keirstead, University Archivist and Acting University Librarian:

I want to advise you that in preparation for a new copyright information and resources website, we are taking down the copyright pages currently available via the Policies link in the footer of Western Libraries' homepage (www.lib.uwo.ca/copyright).

Content on this page will be replaced with a 'site under construction' message, with an indication that the new copyright website will be available before the end of the year and that in the interim any copyright related questions can be directed to the copyright@uwo.ca email address.

This change is being made as a result of several recent developments with respect to copyright, both on campus and nationally, as well as a specific request from members of the community concerned about the current wording, including. for example, the reference to contacting Access Copyright for direction. The new copyright website, when launched, will support Western's focus on enhancing copyright literacy.

Any questions should be directed to Tom Adam at copyright@uwo.ca.

This journal article appears in the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 29, Issue Number 5, 2013):

Abstract:

An instructor tried using connectivism to teach an online graduate Education course called Teaching in a Virtual World. As a way to embody the many connections inherent in the group, all members of the class created and taught modules of their own choosing to each other. The instructor and two former students reflected together online in depth about their experience and coded their joint understandings. Schwab's commonplaces of curriculum emerged in the data, demonstrating that it is still current. They found that the course, however, was not completely connectivist due to limitations emanating from its operation within a traditional university setting.

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts ~ have a look!

Teachers' perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying

This journal article appears in the November 2013 issue of the British Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 44, Issue Number 6)

Abstract:

Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three‐hundred and twenty‐eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male) from different types of schools and professional foci were randomly selected and completed a cyberbullying questionnaire regarding their perceptions of cyberbullying and about their personal experiences in relation to cyberbullying. They also provided background information. Findings indicate that teachers noted that cyberbullying is a problem in their school, suggesting that urgent attention be paid to three aspects: policy making, enhancing awareness of the school team and coping strategies for parents. About half the teachers reported that students complain of harassment through the mobile phone and Internet, and some teachers were themselves cyberbullied. It was found that the teachers' gender, education level and the age of the students they taught affected their level of concern about cyberbullying, and therefore how credible they found the school's commitment to act on it. Female teachers expressed more concern than male teachers, as did teachers of younger children. Special education teachers were more concerned than mainstream teachers and were more likely to believe that the cyberbullying must be confronted. The results contribute to our understanding of the teachers' perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, which could serve as a basis for developing policy guidelines in schools as well as establishing programs for school teachers to cope with cyberbullying.

The Canadian Association of University Teachers announces CAUT's Equity and Diversity Forum which will be held at the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Hotel in Toronto on February 7-9, 2014.

The theme of the Forum is "Perpetual Crisis? Diversity with Equity in the Academy" and will bring together an exciting group of panellists and speakers.

The event provides an important opportunity for members of your association - officers, executive members, chief negotiators, equity activists, and other interested members to meet colleagues from other associations, share high level discussion and best practices and build a network of contacts and support so that your association can more effectively fulfill its obligations in relation to the promotion of equity within your institution and the larger society.

The Forum begins on Friday, February 7, 2014, with registration beginning at noon and the opening session at 13:30. The Forum will end at noon on Sunday, February 9.


The Forum will be conducted in English; there will be no simultaneous translation.

If you have any questions about the Forum, please contact at Lynn Braun braun@caut.ca

This journal article appears in the December 2013 issue of the American Journal of Community Psychology (Volume 52, Issue Number 3-4):

Abstract:

Service learning is increasingly being used as a pedagogical strategy for promoting the development of civic-mindedness among university students. Despite the use of this strategy, little is known about the benefits derived from specific types of service-learning experiences. Additionally, few notable studies have examined the unique outcomes experienced by mentors of at-risk youth. Therefore, this study examines the civic-related benefits that college students derive from mentoring at-risk youth within a structured, service-learning course. A series of linear regression models were estimated to determine if there were significant post-intervention differences between the treatment and comparison condition for the variables of interest, after adjusting for key background factors and pre-intervention levels of all variables. The results indicated that, in comparison to college students who did not participate in the course (n = 258), college student in Campus Corps, a youth mentoring program, (n = 390) had significantly higher scores at post-intervention regarding mentors' civic attitudes, community service self-efficacy, self-esteem, interpersonal and problem solving skills, political awareness, and civic action. Findings hold important implications for youth mentoring programs and future research.

This journal article appears in the December 2013 issue of School Mental Health (Volume 5, Issue 4):

Abstract:

The present study sought to gain a better understanding of cyber bullying (i.e., the use of information technologies to inflict harm on another person) by examining its prevalence, its relationship with traditional bullying, and the relationship between bullying, anxiety, and depression in a sample of rural and ethnoracially diverse youth (N = 211; ages 10-13). Thirty-three percent of participants reported being victims of traditional bullying and 9 % reported perpetrating traditional bullying behavior. Seven percent of participants were victims of cyber bullying, 4 % reported that they participated in cyber bully behavior, and 2 % were both of victims and perpetrators of cyber bullying. Bullying victims reported significantly higher levels of anxiety and depression compared with non-victims and bullies endorsed significant anxiety and depression. Results suggest that while cyber bullying does occur in rural communities, it often co-occurs with traditional bullying. Additionally, a novel cyber bullying measure was developed and utilized, and information regarding its reliability and validity is included.

Dear colleagues,

As members of the London community, you may be aware of The Pledge to End Bullying a community-wide initiative led by the Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB) that seeks to raise the public consciousness about bullying in schools, at work and at home. Last year, more than 140,000 people declared their commitment to end bullying by taking The Pledge.

Ontario's Ministry of Education defines bullying as repeated, persistent and aggressive behaviour directed at an individual or individuals, intended to cause (or should be known to cause) fear and distress and/or harm to another person's body, feelings, self-esteem or reputation. Bullying occurs in a context where there is a real or perceived power imbalance and can be physical, verbal, social or electronic (cyberbullying).

As part of Western's commitment to creating and supporting a healthy, safe and respectful working and learning environment, I hope you will join me today and take The Pledge to End Bullying as individuals, or teams/groups, at www.thepledgetoendbullying.ca.

There is no place for bullying behaviour on our campus or in our community. Taking The Pledge is one way in which we can each make a commitment to stand up to bullying in all its forms.

Sincerely,
Amit Chakma
President, Western University

The Librarian is reading...

FREE subscription to University Affairs magazine

Faculty, staff and graduate students can subscribe to University Affairs magazine at no charge. The only requirement is that the subscription must be sent to a university campus address.

University Affairs is the most trusted source of news, information and opinion about higher education in Canada. Covering the university scene for over 50 years, University Affairs is also the country's largest source of career advertising aimed at the academic community.

To get your FREE SUBSCRIPTION (a $39 value), simply subscribe through the University Affairs website.

While on the site, also check out the Career Resources section. It has a lot of helpful information aimed at graduate students and faculty, such as Careers Café, a popular blog for academic job seekers. You can also sign up for customized job e-mail alerts, listen to podcasts or view videos.

Did we mention it is FREE if the subscription is sent to a university campus address?

Western Libraries' Map and Data Centre welcomes you to join us for GIS Day on November 20, 2013.

This event will take place in the NEW location of the Map and Data Centre - Ground floor, The D.B. Weldon Library. Presentations will be held in the Teaching Support Centre within Weldon Library (TSC 120 - 1st Floor). Please drop in to learn about the many uses of GIS (Geographic Information Systems). This link will give you all of the times and events planned throughout the day so check for all the details.

Refreshments will be served, door prizes are available.
Please join us!

The Faculty of Education at Western University and The Centre for Social Concern at King's University College Present:

Scholars on Their Way to Entrepreneurs: Barbadian Elite School Youth as Postcolonial Argonauts of the North American Global Higher Education Market Place

Presented by:
Dr. Cameron McCarthy
From the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


This Presentation will direct attention to a critical but neglected concern in the area of globalization studies: the role of school in transnational class formation and the preparation of highly-mobile school youth for globalizing futures.

This presentation is scheduled from 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm and will take place in the Community Room (1139) at the Faculty of Education. Coffee and water will be provided. All are welcome! This lecture will be video-recorded. For more information, please contact Goli Rezai-Rashti.

This journal article appears in the September 2013 issue of Education and Information Technologies (Volume18, Issue Number 3)

Abstract

Although blended learning has been considered as an important alternative approach that can overcome various limitations related to both face-to-face and online learning, there is relatively limited empirical studies on blended learning approach in teacher education programs. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review empirical research studies on teacher education programs using activity theory. A review of empirical research on blended learning could help to stimulate reflections on effective strategies for design and implementation of blended learning teacher education programs.

This journal article appears in the October 2013 issue of Interactive Learning Environments (Volume 21, Issue Number 5).

Abstract:

This article describes the design and evaluation of a blended online/face-to-face course completed by more than 6000 learners throughout the United States of America and internationally. The educational impact was monitored using a variety of evaluation strategies. The results, in terms of achieved knowledge and overall satisfaction, indicate that a focus on online instruction combined with face-to-face, hands-on activities showed statistically significant improvement in the learners' understanding of the course material, while also validating the impact of the curriculum in their workplace. As illustrated through the blended course design, this study further showed that online learners with greater improvement in their pre- and posttest scores also exhibited significantly greater likelihood in demonstrating competency in several areas during the hands-on portion of the course. In particular, participants working in the information systems field exhibited the highest mean difference score (21.49) on the pre- and the posttests, while those working in the laboratory had the lowest (12.17). Likewise, the odds that participants who reviewed the course contents sought to further understand their job roles was 58.2 times greater for those in information systems, while it was only 19.0 times greater for laboratory staff, than those who did not review their job roles.

This journal article is available in the April 2014 (no, not a typo) issue of International Journal of e-Education, e-Business, e-Management and e-Learning (Volume 4, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Nowadays, many are accessing social networks from mobile devices rather than from desktop computers, Facebook is currently the most commonly-used online social network among people and becomes the most-used mobile app in the U.S. by introducing a controversial new mobile interface, Facebook Home. The Facebook app now represents our smartphone-centric lives which should be applied in education. This paper will then illustrate the development of Blended Problem-based Instructional Model via Facebook Application on Mobile. The procedures of this paper were divided into two phases: The first was to study conceptual framework of related literatures, included blended problem-based learning, and Facebook application. The second was to develop the Blended Problem-based Instructional Model via Facebook Application on Mobile. The end results have shown that this model consisted of eight steps, 1) Preparing (F2F), 2) Identifying (Online), 3) Analyzing (Online), 4) Searching (F2F and Online), 5) Creating (Online), 6) Testing (Online), 7) Gathering (F2F), and 8) Evaluating (F2F and Online). One last word must be said that with the use of Facebook application on mobile devices, learners can learn anywhere and at any time.

Contact Us!

We make it very easy to CONTACT US if you have any questions about the Education Library's hours, services, resources (books, ebooks, databases) or our other collections.

Education Graduate Information Session ~ Saturday Nov 16, 2013

There are plenty of exciting changes in the Faculty of Education's graduate programs, and applications are now open for Western Education's Research Intensive and Professional Programs at the masters and doctoral level. Find out MORE at the Graduate Information Session on Saturday November 16, 2013.

Graduate Students ~ Education Library Research Consultations Available

Education Library Research Support: Online/Email or In-Person Research Consultations are available.

Contact the Education academic librarians by email at eduref@uwo.ca to ask a research question or to make an appointment. This service is especially convenient for online graduate students as we provide research consultations via email, as well as in person.

Looking for help with APA Style®?

We urge you to start with this APA STYLE HELP PAGE!

Education Library's SECOND INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEO is now available!

Getting Started ~ Consult the Western Libraries Program Guides

When planning your papers, assignments, annotated bibliographies and literature reviews you will find the Western Libraries Program Guides a great place to start.

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts ~ have a look!

Scholars at Risk Panel ~ Wednesday Nov. 13, 2013

The event in the following announcement from Julie McMullin, Vice-Provost (Western International), will be of interest to many of us.

I want to bring your attention to the Scholars at Risk Panel that will be held next week, during International Week at Western. The panel features Professors Michael Lynk, Joanna Quinn and Anna Dolidze.

Professor Michael Lynk will provide an overview of the Scholars at Risk Program.

Professor Joanna Quinn will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with hosting a Scholar at Risk at Western.

Professor Anna Dolidze will discuss her experience with the Scholars at Risk Program and her experience at Western.

When: Nov. 13, 11:00-12:00
Where: Chu International Centre, WSS 2130

Researchers: Western's Updated MAPP Policy 7.0

Please note Western's MAPP Policy 7.0 "Academic Integrity in Research Activities" has been updated, approved by the Board of Governors, and posted to the University Secretariat site. The updated policy brings Western into compliance with the requirements of the 2nd edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS 2) and the Tri-Agency Framework: Responsible Conduct of Research (the Framework). MAPP Research Policies are located at: http://www.uwo.ca/univsec/policies_procedures/research.html

COMING SOON! New Copyright Information and Resources Website

This message is from Robin Keirstead, University Archivist and Acting University Librarian:

I want to advise you that in preparation for a new copyright information and resources website, we are taking down the copyright pages currently available via the Policies link in the footer of Western Libraries' homepage (www.lib.uwo.ca/copyright). This will done in the next day or so.

Content on this page will be replaced with a 'site under construction' message, with an indication that the new copyright website will be available before the end of the year and that in the interim any copyright related questions can be directed to the copyright@uwo.ca email address.

This change is being made as a result of several recent developments with respect to copyright, both on campus and nationally, as well as a specific request from members of the community concerned about the current wording, including. for example, the reference to contacting Access Copyright for direction. The new copyright website, when launched, will support Western's focus on enhancing copyright literacy.

Any questions should be directed to Tom Adam at copyright@uwo.ca.

The Librarian is reading...

Seducing Souls: Education and The Experience of Human Well-Being by Karl D. Hostetler (Education Library lower level STACKS LC1100.H67 2011)

LEST WE FORGET ~ REMEMBRANCE DAY TEACHING RESOURCES

There is a display of teaching and learning Remembrance Day resources located on the main floor of the Education Library. If you wish you may check out any of the resources on the display table.

LEST WE FORGET ~ Remembrance Day (November 11) at Western University

"Western's Senate approved Policy on Observance of Remembrance Day requires that two minutes of silence be observed on November 11 at 11:00 a.m. throughout the university and where this is not possible, two minutes of silence be observed between 11:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. Students shall be permitted to be absent from class to attend a Remembrance Day Service, provided that the instructor is informed in advance of the intended absence."

This journal article appears in Talent Development & Excellence (Volume 5, Issue Number 2, 2013, A Special Issue: The Elusive Search for the Gifted Personality). This article is written by R.W. Sandieson and S. M. McIsaac.

Western Libraries' Map and Data Centre ~ GIS Day ~ November 20, 2013

Western Libraries' Map and Data Centre welcomes you to join us for GIS Day on November 20, 2013.

This event will take place in the new location of the Map and Data Centre - Ground floor, The D.B. Weldon Library. Presentations will be held in the Teaching Support Centre within Weldon Library (TSC 120 - 1st Floor). Please drop in to learn about the many uses of GIS (Geographic Information Systems).

Refreshments will be served, door prizes are available.
Please join us!

This journal article is available in the September 2013 issue of Education Canada (Volume 53, Issue Number 4).

This journal article is available in the October 2013 (Issue 146) Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy.

Remembrance Day (November 11) at Western

Western's Senate approved Policy on Observance of Remembrance Day requires that two minutes of silence be observed on November 11 at 11:00 a.m. throughout the university and where this is not possible, two minutes of silence be observed between 11:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. Students shall be permitted to be absent from class to attend a Remembrance Day Service, provided that the instructor is informed in advance of the intended absence.

The policy is posted on the web here: http://www.uwo.ca/univsec/pdf/academic_policies/appeals/remembrance_day.pdf


The Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™ database focuses on Canadian information in the field of education. It's the perfect source for those interested in teaching, educational research, and educational leadership/administration in Canada.

CBCA Education is a ProQuest product so the search screen will look similar to the ERIC database and to ProQuest Education Journals.

It is easy to get started! Start at the Western Libraries homepage.

If you are working off campus you must type in your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account).
Click on the RESEARCH tab along the top of the Western Libraries homepage.
Click on DATABASES.
Click on C.
Click on CBCA Education.
(NB: You may want to bookmark this link for later easy access)
Start typing in (and combining) your keywords.
Most (but not all) articles will be available to you to read in full text.

Getting Started ~ Education Research Databases

Looking for research journal articles for your assignments, funding requests, literature reviews, annotated bibliographies and/or upcoming papers? As a student a Western University you have online access to hundreds of research databases and full-text journal articles. As a Faculty of Education student you may be most interested in the education-related research databases. Start your literature review in one of the education research databases:

CBCA Education (for Canadian/Ontario education related journal articles)

ERIC (PLEASE NOTE: There are ongoing access problems with the ERIC database. Some PDF documents (e.g., those identified with an ED number) may be temporarily not available in full-text online format - please talk to the Education academic librarian if you need these documents.

ProQuest Education Journals

Professional Development Collection

All education graduate students should also use the Dissertations and Theses database for a thorough literature review.

And, for our Counselling/Educational Psychology students: PsycINFO

Need to know if a journal is peer-reviewed or not?

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

ERIC Database is (still) problematic


The problems with the ERIC database continue.
Graduate Students. Scholars and Researchers: For the purpose of your literature reviews, grant proposals and papers, please search the ProQuest Education Journals database (found on the Databases list on the Western Libraries website) to find the full text of scholarly, peer-reviewed journal research articles. If you need to find ERIC documents, you can try searching the ERIC website. Some but not all of the ERIC documents have been digitized and are available online in full text on the ERIC website.


Canadian and International Education = Education Canadienne et Internationale. the official journal of the Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC), is published twice a year and is devoted to publishing articles dealing with education in a comparative and international perspective. This journal is now edited by Western's Faculty of Education's Marianne Larsen.

Getting Started ~ Summon Search Engine on the Western Libraries' Website

Summon is a simple and fast search engine that will discover content from Western Libraries' vast collection of books, journal articles and other formats for virtually any topic using a single search box from the Western Libraries' website.


Getting Started ~ Consult the Western Libraries Program Guides


When planning your papers, assignments, research and literature reviews you will find the Western Libraries Program Guides a great place to start.


If you have questions, we've got answers! Email your library research queries to the academic librarians at the Education Library: eduref@uwo.ca. We are here to help you. Contact us!

Video ~ "Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools"

The Education Library academic librarians, Christena and Denise H, made their first foray into creating instructional videos. We have created a video titled "Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools." It is approximately 4 minutes in length! Have a look!

Lights, camera, action: More Education Library videos are in production.

Quiet Study Space Available

There is quiet study space available on all three floors of Western's Education Library (located right next door to Ontario Hall) while the Faculty of Education BEd students are out on their teaching practicum.

Lest We Forget

From now until Monday November 11th there is a display of teaching and learning Remembrance Day resources located on the main floor of the Education Library. If you wish you may check out any of the resources on the display table.

Education Library Twitter feed is devoted to...

...the graduate students in Diverse Traditions: Approaches to Educational Research (ED9778-002). But, all Faculty of Education graduate students will find the Education Library tweets very informative!

I had the pleasure of making a presentation to the Faculty of Education graduate students enrolled in Dr. Catharine Dishke Hondzel's Diverse Traditions: Approaches to Educational Research (ED9778-002) on Tuesday night.

Here is a recap of the topics I covered with the graduate students:

We always recommend researchers start their search at the Western Libraries' website.
After reminding the students to type in their Western username and password in the Off-Campus Access boxes on the Western Libraries website, we talked about the website default search engine, Summon.

I demonstrated specific features of the library catalogue by conducting a title search. The catalogue is found in a couple of places on the library website. We choose the link to the catalogue from along the top bar of options. I selected Research Methods and Methodologies in Education (the textbook for this particular course) as an example of a book title search.

Looking at the catalogue record we talked about the location, call number and status of the book. I showed the students how to sort by publication date and how to limit to a specific library location. Both of these features are invaluable time-saving strategies. The final aspect of the catalogue that I emphasized was the "clickable" subject headings that provide further research resources for the researcher. The two subject headings for this book were Education -- Research -- Methodology (yielded an additional 146 items) and Education -- Research. (yielded an additional 472 items).

The discussion of subject headings lead naturally to a discussion about finding and using keywords in the research databases. I encourage the graduate students to read Dr. Robert Sandieson's research article noted in their course outlines.

Emerging scholars are expected to use the research tools (e.g., Summon, library catalogue and databases) provided by Western to find supporting evidence for their own scholarly work and in order to complete assignments. Databases are keyword friendly so a researcher can easily get started but most databases also provide suggested keywords and/or a thesaurus to assist students in finding a variety of different ways to describe their research.

It was noted that Google is fine for planning a vacation (Montreal!) but not for doing extensive graduate-level research. Google Scholar may be a useful starting point but we always recommend the use of the research databases.

On the Western Libraries website DATABASES are listed under RESEARCH on the library website. Students can choose databases from an alphabetical or subject list of databases. The subject list of databases is a great place to look if you are new to a field and you are unsure of which databases would be most suited to your topic. Western Libraries PROGRAM GUIDES are a good place to start your research.

I briefly chatted about the long and storied history of the ERIC database. It was more than a decade ago but I still clearly remember the cold day in December we were notified that all 17 of the ERIC Clearinghouses were abruptly closed. It was sad day for educational researchers.

I suggested the students also search: CBCA Education, Dissertations and Theses, ProQuest Education Journals and PsycINFO. I demonstrated (and most students followed along) using the ProQuest Education Journals databases. I talked briefly about my own research interests and provided a demonstration searching using "adult learning" and mentor*. We analyzed the RESULTS LIST and got to the point where we could read the full text of an article on the screen.

We also talked about creating an annotated bibliography and I recommended a help page created by our University of Toronto colleagues.

Finally, I also explained the RefWorks and InterLibrary Loan (RACER) options available from the Western Libraries website. I fielded many excellent questions from these graduate students and I was able to answer almost all of them.

I assured the graduate students that HELP is always available. I am available for personalized research consultations. The Education Library academic librarians can be reached by email at eduref@uwo.ca Further and more intensive research help is available to all of the graduate students when they make a personal follow-up research consultation appointment with me. It was a pleasure to meet these students and to working with Catharine. Good luck to one and all.

PS
I also promoted the Education Library's professional Facebook and Twitter pages and our very first Getting Started Research video!

Library Hours ~ Thanksgiving Weekend

The Education Library is closed on Saturday October 12, Sunday October 13, and Monday October 14 as we celebrate the Thanksgiving long weekend.

EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) is making the government database ERIC available during the government shutdown. ERIC, the Education Resource Information Center, is typically available through the government website (http://eric.ed.gov/) as well as via EBSCO's EBSCOhost® research platform. Because of the shutdown, access to the full text of articles and other materials will not be available but researchers will have access to the full set of A&I records on EBSCOhost. Users going to http://www.ebsco.com/freeERIC will now see ERIC listed among the other free EBSCO databases such as GreenFILE™ and Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts™ (LISTA).

ERIC provides access to educational literature and resources including access to information from journals included in the Current Index of Journals in Education and Resources in Education Index. It was designed as a national information system to provide access to education literature and resources. According to its website, "ERIC is the world's largest and most frequently used education digital library." ERIC provides more than 1.4 million bibliographic records and dates back to 1966.

Please note: The academic librarians at the Education Library suggest you continue to search ProQuest Education Journals for the full text of educational journal articles.

Copyright Matters! (3rd Edition) now available online

Attention All Educators: Third edition of Copyright Matters! Some Key Questions and Answers for Teachers is now available online.

The JCR Web is a resource tool for journal evaluation, using citation data drawn from over 8,400 journals. The JCR, via Social Sciences Citation Index/ISI Web of Knowledge, is the only source of citation data on journals, and includes virtually all specialties in the areas of science, technology, and social sciences - including the field of education.

Education Library's New Website

We launched our new website earlier this month - just in time for the beginning of classes at the Faculty of Education. Feedback and comments have been positive. Have a look and let us know what you think. Thanks for your continued support.

ProQuest Databases ~ Scheduled Downtime

Dear Researchers: ProQuest has scheduled some downtime for their research databases. It is scheduled for: Eastern Time: Saturday, September 28, 2013 at 22:00 for four (4) hours (approximately).

MY LIBRARY ACCOUNT option in the library catalogue

Easily manage your library resources online!

To learn more:

Please log in to access the personalized service offered by "My Library Account" within the library catalogue.

For more information about activating the MY READING HISTORY option within the library catalogue, click here.

Thanksgiving Long Weekend

The Education Library is closed on Saturday October 12, Sunday October 13, and Monday October 14 as we celebrate the Thanksgiving long weekend.

I had the pleasure of making a presentation to the Faculty of Education graduate students enrolled in Fei Wang's Power, Politics and Policy in Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives class on Monday night.

Here is a recap of the topics I covered with the graduate students:

After reminded the students to type in their Western username and password in the Off-Campus access boxes on the Western Libraries website, I encouraged (to be exact, I used the word implored) the students in this course to familiarize themselves with the Ontario Ministry of Education website. In particular, I directed the student's attention to the Policy/Program Memorandum listed on the Ministry's website. I talked quite specifically about one policy that interested me: PPM 150: School Food And Beverage Policy. I used this policy to talk about gathering and combining keywords related to a topic, and using those keywords to search the research databases. As a demonstration I searched the Canadian education database called CBCA Education. I also mentioned that graduate students would want to search Canadian Newsstand Major Dailies and ProQuest Education Journals databases. We also talked about creating an annotated bibliography and I recommended a help page created by our University of Toronto colleagues. Finally, I also explained the RefWorks and InterLibrary Loan (RACER) options available from the Western Libraries website. I fielded many excellent questions from these graduate students and I was able to answer almost all of them. Further and more intensive research help is available to all of the graduate students when they make a personal follow-up research consultation appointment with me. It was a pleasure to meet these students and to working with Fei again. Good luck to one and all.

PS
I also promoted the Education Library's Getting Started Research video!

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts ~ have a look!

Preparing Politically Savvy Principals in Ontario, Canada

This journal article, written by Sue Winton and Katina Pollock, appeared in the Journal of Educational Administration (Volume 51, Issue Number 1, 2013).

Abstract:


Purpose - The aim of the paper is to argue that principal preparation programs should help candidates: recognize the political role of the school principal; develop political skills (including the ability to strategically appropriate policy); and understand that the political approach of the principal influences teaching, learning, relationships, governance, and reform efforts. In addition, the paper reports findings of the analysis of Ontario's Principal Qualification Program guidelines to determine if they require principal preparation programs to develop aspiring school leaders' political skills. Design/methodology/approach - The paper reviews theoretical arguments and empirical studies from the fields of school micropolitics, business, educational leadership, and critical policy studies to establish five political skills principals require. The authors then conducted a content analysis of Ontario's Principal Qualification Program guidelines to determine if they require principal preparation programs to develop aspiring leaders' political skills. Findings - Ontario's Principal Qualification Program guidelines do not explicitly direct principal preparation programs to help candidates develop political skills. However, the guidelines recognize that principals pursue political goals and work in political environments, and they offer opportunities for appropriating the guidelines in ways that promote the development of principal candidates' political skills. Originality/value - The paper is the first to analyze Ontario's Principal Qualification Program guidelines to determine if they require principal preparation programs to develop aspiring leaders' political skills. It also identifies policy appropriation as a political skill that should be developed in principal preparation programs and provides a model of how principal preparation policies themselves may be appropriated to support a focus on developing aspiring principals' political skills.

The Librarian is reading...

The Tender Hour of Twilight: Paris in the '50s, New York in the '60s: A Memoir of Publishing's Golden Age by Richard Seaver

Summary (from the publisher's website):

Richard Seaver came to Paris in 1950 seeking Hemingway's moveable feast. Paris had become a different city, traumatized by World War II, yet the red wine still flowed, the cafés bustled, and the Parisian women found American men exotic and heroic. There was an Irishman in Paris writing plays and novels unlike anything anyone had ever read--but hardly anyone was reading them. There were others, too, doing equivalently groundbreaking work for equivalently small audiences. So when his friends launched a literary magazine, Merlin, Seaver knew this was his calling: to bring the work of the likes of Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, and Jean Genet to the world. The Korean War ended all that--the navy had paid for college and it was time to pay them back. After two years at sea, Seaver washed ashore in New York City with a beautiful French wife and a wider sense of the world than his compatriots. The only young literary man with the audacity to match Seaver's own was Barney Rosset of Grove Press. A remarkable partnership was born, one that would demolish U.S. censorship laws with inimitable joie de vivre as Seaver and Rosset introduced American readers to Lady Chatterly's Lover, Henry Miller, Story of O, William Burroughs, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and more. As publishing hurtles into its uncertain future, The Tender Hour of Twilight is a stirring reminder of the passion, the vitality, and even the glamour of a true life in literature.

The academic librarians at the Education Library, Christena McKillop and Denise Horoky, created a getting started handout for graduate students and researchers. It is available HERE and a link is also provided on the Education Library's website.

New Book ~ Case Study Research: Design and Methods (5th Edition)

From the publisher's website:

Providing a complete portal to the world of case study research, the Fifth Edition of Robert K. Yin's bestselling text offers comprehensive coverage of the design and use of the case study method as a valid research tool. The book offers a clear definition of the case study method as well as discussion of design and analysis techniques. The Fifth Edition has been updated with nine new case studies, three new appendices, seven tutorials presented at the end of relevant chapters, increased coverage of values and ethics, expanded discussion on logic models, a brief glossary, and completely updated citations. This book includes exemplary case studies drawn from a wide variety of academic fields.

Have you read this yet?

From Western's Faculty of Education website:

One of the best ways to get off to a good start and make the most of your learning experience this year is to connect with the Faculty's news, event, information, and social platforms. Doing so will keep you informed for your academic well-being and allow you to enrich the Western Education community by participating in events as an attendee, host, and thought leader.

Follow these five steps, and you'll be well-positioned to benefit from the content available at your fingertips.

Getting Started Video

The Education Library academic librarians made their first foray into creating instructional videos this summer and we have created a video titled "Introduction to the Education Library Research Tools." It is approximately 4 minutes in length! So, this September sip a pumpkin spice latte, enjoy the fall weather and watch the video for getting started on doing research using the library catalogue and the research databases.

Lights, camera, action: More Education Library videos are in production.

Education Library's New Website

We launched our new website this week - just in time for the beginning of classes at the Faculty of Education. Have a look and let us know what you think.

In order to receive all official email communication from Western and Western Libraries new students must activate their Western computer account. You may activate your Western Identity/Email online by following these simple procedures.

Today is a very historical and celebratory day. I happily found this amazing DVD, I Have a Dream: The Nature of Great Speakers, in the Education Library's main floor multimedia KIT collection (the call number is PN4061.I222 1994):

"This fascinating film analyzes why Martin Luther King's extraordinary 1963 speech was so effective. The film combines film sequences from the speech, historical photos from the Civil Rights movement, and graphics with an appreciative and probing examination of King's use of words and images. Dr. Osborn draws heavily on the work of the Roman writer, Longinus, augmenting classical theory to enhance our current understanding of the impact of King's oration. Illustrated with archival news clips, photos and other contemporary film, and with commentary by Dr. Osborne, theory is tied to practice in a manner that promotes thoughtful discussion of one of the most widely studied speeches of our time. This film is an excellent resource for all public speaking classes, courses in rhetorical theory and criticism. For students of American history or the Classics, the film serves as a vital link between disciplines."

Western University is committed to growing its number of academically qualified international students and its newly formed English Language Centre (ELC) will create such an opportunity for its first-ever class, which is set to arrive on campus this weekend.

The first cohort of 85 ELC students is primarily from Asia, however, the centre's leadership team has also collaborated with Western International and Brescia University College to recruit 19 scholarship students from Angola, who traditionally would have been destined to study in the United States.

"Studying at Western, in London and in Canada has incredible advantages," says ELC Administrative Director Matt Bazely. "Canada is a welcoming country for international students, London is a safe community and the quality of a Western degree makes for a great recruiting pitch.

"With the new English Language Centre in place, Western is well positioned to recruit across the globe to find the best and brightest students to study here, which is one of the goals outlined in Western's recently released strategic plan. We look forward to our students benefitting from a rich campus life, incredible student services and a world class residence system."

Steve Bird, ELC Academic Director, is excited about the research possibilities, as well.

"Our research will be focused on crucial areas such as student success, vocabulary development, and academic acculturation," says Bird, who has already started connecting with colleagues from across campus to co-develop research projects. "The Centre will be a catalyst for research and publications as we contribute to the fields of international education, socio-linguistics and psycho-linguisitcs."

Students will study at ELC for four to 16 months, depending on their individual language proficiency. Many of the students will also stay in residence on Western's campus.

Based in Western's Faculty of Education, ELC prepares international students for academic studies at Western, Brescia, King's University College and Huron University College.

Contact Us ~ We've Got Answers!

If you have questions, we've got answers! Email your library research queries to the academic librarians at the Education Library: eduref@uwo.ca. We are here to help you.

Getting Started ~ Consult the Western Libraries Program Guides

When planning your papers, assignments and literature reviews you will find the Western Libraries Program Guides a great place to start.

Western University Academic Librarians and Archivists

Denise Horoky and Christena McKillop are the academic librarians for the Faculty of Education. In addition, you have a whole team of Western University academic librarians and archivists supporting you and your research. Contact us. We are all here to help you!

The Librarian is Reading...

Stiletto Network: Inside the Women's Power Circles That Are Changing the Face of Business

Summary: Formidable ladies across professions are convening at unprecedented rates, forming salons, dinner groups, and networking circles--and collaborating to achieve clout and success. A new girls' network is alive and set to hyperdrive. "Stiletto Network" is about those groups.

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

The Education Library has active Facebook and Twitter accounts ~ have a look!

To welcome our new Teacher Candidates at the beginning of this academic year we have set up two displays on the main floor of the Education Library. One display features SPECIAL EDUCATION teaching resources. The other display of teaching resources is simply titled: OUCH. (Yes, you will have to come into the Education Library to find out more about that second display!).

Labour Day Weekend

The Education Library is closed on Saturday August 31st, Sunday September 1st and Monday September 2nd to celebrate the Labour Day long weekend. See you back at the Faculty of Education on Tuesday September 3rd. The Education Library will open at 8:30 am.

Hours of Opening for Fall 2013

Here are the Education Library's Hours of Opening for Fall 2013.

Contact Us at the Education Library ~ We are here to help you!

We make it very easy to contact us if you have any questions about the Education Library's hours, services, resources or collections.

Welcome ~ Education Library Open House

A warm welcome to our new incoming 2013 - 2014 Teaching Candidates at Western's Faculty of Education. The Education Library will have an OPEN HOUSE on Thursday August 29th from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. The Education Library is located in Western's Faculty of Education between the Student Council Office and the Blackboard Cafe. The library's unique round shape and domed roof make it very easy to locate.

Stop by the library and say hi. Browse through our book displays!

Summon Search Engine on the Western Libraries' Website

Summon is a simple and fast search engine that will discover content from Western Libraries' vast collection of books, journal articles and other formats for virtually any topic using a single search box from the Western Libraries' website.

Bill Tucker, the retiring Director of the Thames Valley District School Board, has joined Western University's Faculty of Education as a Visiting Appointment at the rank of Associate Professor, effective September 1, 2013. Tucker will teach in the Educational Leadership Program, conduct research as part of the Faculty of Education's Children's Mental Health initiative along with its partner the Child and Youth Network, serve as an inaugural fellow of the doctoral Educational Leadership program, and work as a provincial liaison for the Faculty of Education.

"I couldn't be prouder to be a part of Western's Faculty of Education," says Tucker. "As an educator I am aware of the high degree of respect in which this faculty is regarded. I am just thrilled to be a part of it and of the exciting changes taking place under the leadership of Dean Vicki Schwean."


Canadian and international education = Education canadienne et internationale. the official journal of the Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC), is published twice a year and is devoted to publishing articles dealing with education in a comparative and international perspective. This journal is now edited by Western's Faculty of Education's Marianne Larsen.

What Works Clearinghouse (WWC)

Educators trying to make choices to help students and schools meet high standards can become overwhelmed by the amount of education research. It can also be hard to identify research with credible and reliable evidence to use in making informed decisions.

As an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) was created in 2002 to be a central and trusted source of scientific evidence for what works in education.

ERIC Database is still problematic

The problems with the ERIC database continue.


Graduate Students, for the purpose of your literature reviews and papers, please search the ProQuest Education Journals database to find the full text of scholarly journal research articles.

If you need to find ERIC documents, you can try searching the ERIC website.

The Librarian is reading...

It was lovely to meet the Education graduate students in EDUC 9678 on Wednesday May 15, 2013. The academic librarian rolled up her sleeves and gave a class presentation about the "tools and help" available to graduate students when planning their educational research.


Here are the highlights of that teaching session:

Library Catalogue (used to find book/ebook resources, and journal titles - with access to the full text of some journal articles)

Research Databases - we discussed CBCA Education (for Canadian/Ontario education information), ERIC (and the problems ERIC is experiencing) and ProQuest Education Journals. We also spend quite a bit of time discussing the Dissertations and Theses database.

Context sensitive help is available within all of these ProQuest databases through the Thesaurus or the Search Tips options.

These research databases lead you to (mostly) full text journal articles. Yo can critically read and analyze these journal articles in order to situate your own research within the existing body of research literature.

Summon - Summon is a simple and fast search engine that will discover content from Western Libraries' vast collection of books, journal articles and other formats for virtually any topic using a single search box.


Other Help

Research Information Guide for Education Graduate Students

Program Guides for Education

Personalize Research Consultation are available - Contact the academic librarian at the Education Library.


The academic librarian also showcased the Education Library's Facebook page and the Education Library's Twitter feed as models of using social media to create a 'personal learning network' or a 'professional learning network.' Using social media in this way, you can personalized and customized them to suit your own educational or professional needs and learning needs to create a powerful PLN.

The JCR Web is a resource tool for journal evaluation, using citation data drawn from over 8,400 journals. The JCR, via ISI Web of Knowledge, is the only source of citation data on journals, and includes virtually all specialties in the areas of science, technology, and social sciences.

The JCR can show you: journal impact factors, highest impact journals, most frequently used journals, hottest journals and largest journals.

Graduate Students Getting Started: Use Program Guides

Graduate students will find the Program Guides (created by academic librarians) listed on the Western Libraries website a very useful place to begin the research and literature review process.

Speaker series talk/presentation:
"Whatever it is, just sing your song." Lessons from intergenerational singing.


When and Where:
This free event will take place on Wednesday May 15 2013 at 7:00pm in Room 1139 at Western's Faculty of Education


Presenters:
Dr. Carol Beynon (Education), Jennifer Hutchison (Ph.D. Candidate, Music) and Ken Fleet (Singer/Co-Conductor, ALSM Intergenerational Choir)


Summary:
The power of personally connecting with music and reminiscing through music carries many perceived cognitive, social, spiritual and physiological benefits. We will describe and demonstrate to what extent these benefits are perceived and experienced in our current research, which involves a singing program that brings seniors affected by Alzheimer's together with secondary school students.

The start of this new Intersession term is a good time to have a(nother) look at this very useful handout written by the Education Library's academic librarians to help graduate students get started on their papers, literature reviews and research.

As part of my ongoing professional development as an academic librarian I attended a three day workshop (Wednesday, May 1 - Friday May 3) at the Western Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning at Western University's Teaching Support Centre (TSC). I am still reflecting on the questions and discussions with other faculty members about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

Graduate Students ~ Library Research Consultations Available

Library research support and online or in-person research consultations are available.

Contact the Education academic librarians by email at eduref@uwo.ca to ask a question or to make an appointment. This service is especially convenient for online graduate students as we provide research consultations via email, as well as in person.

Contact Information for the Education Library

We make it very easy to contact us if you have any questions about the Education Library's hours, services, resources or collections.

Spring and Summer Hours of Opening

The Education Library has changed to our Spring and Summer Hours of Opening. Check for details HERE.

Need to know if a journal is peer-reviewed or not?

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

Ulrich's Periodical Directory/Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

Online Help with the APA Style® is Available

The rules of APA Style®, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On this site, you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

I have found the APA Style® Twitter site very useful and I have re-tweeted many of the informational tweets.


You can Follow the APA Style® Twitter site to get updates on all things related to APA Style, including announcements about new blog posts, tips and tricks on writing and style, and more.

Education Library on Facebook and Twitter

Cannot visit the Education Library in person? Not a problem!

Virtually visit the Education Library. Learn about our services and collections on our Facebook page, Twitter page, and our Education Library Program Guides.

Information About Access to ERIC Documents

This is the complete statement about ERIC documents from the ERIC website:


Dear ERIC Community,

We have currently disabled access to many ERIC full-text PDFs due to the discovery of personally identifiable information in some documents. A team is in place to check each PDF to see if it contains personally identifiable information. Due to the quality of many of the documents, a large portion of the search has to be done by hand. This will take several weeks, but our primary concern is to protect the privacy of individuals.

To minimize the burden on our users, we will prioritize searching the PDFs that users request. If you would like to request a PDF to be returned online, please fill out this form, which requires only the document's ERIC record number and your email address. Full-text PDFs will be returned on a rolling basis. We will be posting the list of newly released documents here.

We are sorry for the inconvenience and want to thank you for bearing with us through this unexpected delay.

The ERIC Team

What Does the Message "Get It @ Western" Mean?

Many graduate students ask this question: "What the heck does "Get It @ Western" mean when I see this message in a research database or in the online library catalogue?" Find out all about it!

Education Research Databases

Looking for research journal articles for your assignments, literature review and upcoming papers? As a student a Western University you have online access to hundreds of research databases and full-text journal articles. As a Faculty of Education student you may be most interested in the education-related research databases. Start your literature review in one of the education research databases:

CBCA Education (for Canadian/Ontario education related journal articles)

ERIC (PLEASE NOTE: Some PDF documents (eg., those identified with an ED number may be temporarily not available in full-text online format - please talk to the Education academic librarian if you need these documents)

ProQuest Education Journals

Professional Development Collection

All education graduate students should also use Dissertations and Theses database for a thorough literature review.

And, for our Counselling/Educational Psychology students: PsycINFO

Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™

The Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™ database focuses on Canadian information in the field of education. It's the perfect source for those interested in teaching, educational research, and educational administration in Canada.

CBCA Education is a ProQuest product so the search screen will look similar to the ERIC database and to ProQuest Education Journals.

It is easy to get started! Start at the Western Libraries homepage.

If you are working off campus you must type in your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account).
Click on the RESEARCH tab along the top of the Western Libraries homepage.
Click on DATABASES.
Click on C.
Click on CBCA Education.
(NB: You may want to bookmark this link for later easy access)
Start typing in (and combining) your keywords.

Library Research Consultations Available

Library research support and online or in-person research consultations are available. Contact the Education academic librarians by email at eduref@uwo.ca to ask a question or to make an appointment. This service is especially convenient for online graduate students.

Denise Horoky and Christena McKillop are displaying a poster at the Graduate Research in Education Symposium on April 18, 2013 in the Faculty of Education. The title of the poster is: ENABLE, DISCOVER, CONNECT: Education Academic Librarians Embrace Evolving Technology.

Graduate Research in Education Symposium - April 18, 2013

The Graduate Research in Education Symposium is an annual event that is organized by graduate students at the Faculty of Education.

This Symposium is a great opportunity for graduate students at Western to share their research on education. Participation is open to any Western graduate student, as long as their research relates to education.

Presentation formats include posters, round tables, papers, and creative formats such as song or art. This year we are excited to offer the option of doing a virtual presentation, for those students who are unable to attend the symposium in person.

Welcome to Visiting Scholar ~ Huaimei Gu

We would like to extend a warm welcome to visiting scholar Huaimei Gu. Huaimei arrived in London just this week, and will be with us for 12 months. Her visit has been funded by the Jiangsu Provincial Department of Education, China. Huaimei will be located in the Faculty of Education in office number 1022. Please say hello to her and help welcome her to Canada

Tweens' conceptions of privacy online: implications for educators

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Learning, Media and Technology (Volume 38, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

There is considerable debate about young people's concern for privacy today, given their frequent use of social media to share information and other content about themselves and others. While researchers have investigated the online privacy practices of teens and emerging adults, relatively little is known about the attitudes and behaviors of younger youth. Drawing on interviews with 42 middle school students, or 'tweens', we explore how youth in this age group think about and manage privacy issues online, as well as the messages they report hearing from educators about online privacy. Our findings suggest that most tweens value privacy, seek privacy from both strangers and known others online, and use a variety of strategies to protect their privacy online. Further, tweens' online privacy concerns are considerably broader than the 'stranger danger' messages they report hearing from teachers. We discuss the educational implications of these findings.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue Journal of Youth and Adolescence (Volume 42, Issue Number 3).

Abstract:

Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets` preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based victimization, but is needed to help inform potential interventions, motivate action, and identify strategies to help adolescents cope with experiences of weight-related teasing or bullying. Adolescents (14-18 years, N = 361, 40 % female, 71 % Caucasian) enrolled in national weight-loss camps completed an on-line survey. Participants who reported previous experiences of weight-based victimization were surveyed about their preferred interventions from peers, friends, teachers, Physical Education (PE) teachers/coaches, and parents. Participants indicated their preferences for specific strategies pertaining to target support, bullying intervention and prevention (e.g., inclusion in peer activities, confronting the bully, telling an adult, and improving anti-bullying policies). Friends (66 %) and peers (58 %) were the most highly preferred intervention agents followed by teachers (55 %), PE teachers/coaches (44 %), and parents (43 %). Participants who experienced more weight-based victimization expressed increased desire for intervention. The frequency of victimization, social support from friends and family, and perceived likelihood and helpfulness of intervention significantly influenced participant preferences for certain types of intervention, although preferences were generally consistent across participants' characteristics. The current study is the first to document youth's preferences for interventions in response to weight-based victimization. The findings have important implications for encouraging appropriate intervention and informing bystanders, which may help to reduce the prevalence, recurrence, and consequences for youth who are targets of weight-based teasing or bullying.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Journal of Academic Ethics (Volume 11, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

The process of advisement in the research of a doctoral dissertation is prolonged and harbors a variety of ethical aspects and issues. In some cases it gives rise to dissatisfaction on the part of both advisor and student regarding the process itself and/or the publication of the dissertation. To ameliorate these problems, the Dissertation Committee of the School of Social Work at the University of Haifa recently set out guidelines for both advisor and doctoral student, in accordance with which both parties will draw up an agreement in advance to suit the student's research. The present article discusses the components of the advisement process and presents recommendations for an advisor-doctoral student agreement. Although no evaluation was undertaken by the authors to assess the impact of the guidelines agreement, our brief experience with these guidelines reinforces the importance of such an agreement, which can help assure mutual satisfaction on the part of both the advisor and the student.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Instructional Science (Volume 41, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

While a great deal of research has studied the messages students contribute to electronic discussion forums, productive participation in online learning conversations requires more than just making posts. One important pre-condition for productive interactivity and knowledge construction is engagement with the posts contributed by others. In this study, these actions (how learners interact with the existing discussion; which posts they attend to, when, and how) are conceptualized as "online listening behaviors" and are studied in the context of a large undergraduate business course taught in a blended format. Clickstream data was collected for 96 participants from 3 week-long online discussions to solve organizational behavior challenges in groups of 10-13. Listening behaviors accounted for almost three-quarters of the time learners spent in the discussions, and cluster analysis identified three distinct patterns of behavior: (1) Superficial Listeners, Intermittent Talkers; (2) Concentrated Listeners, Integrated Talkers; and (3) Broad Listeners, Reflective Talkers. The clusters differed in the depth, breadth, temporal contiguity, and reflectivity of their listening as well as in their patterns of speaking. An illustrative case study of how the listening behaviors were enacted by one student from each cluster over time was used to deepen the characterization and interpretation of each cluster. The results indicate that online listening is a complex phenomenon and a substantial component of students' participation in online discussions. Findings are compared to the previous work on student learning approaches and implications for practice and future research are discussed.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Early Childhood Education Journal (Volume 41, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Children make up half of the homeless population in the US, and of those, almost 50 percent are under age six. Homeless children face many different challenges in school. These children and their families have been invisible in school due to the indifference and stereotypes about them. This article focuses on early childhood pre-service teachers' beliefs over the course of one semester at a private university in the United States. The pre-service teachers explored their own perceptions about homeless children through urban community-based field experiences. The pre-service teachers regularly worked with children in homeless shelter learning centers throughout the semester. The data revealed that the pre-service teachers had fears about interacting with the unfamiliar setting, as well as deficit perspectives about homeless children. However, while they were engaged in the community-based experiences, they started to re-examine their deficit views about young homeless children and their families, acquire more accurate information on their complex situations, and positively developed their professional perspectives on these children. This study suggests that raising awareness about homeless children and their families should be a part of both professional development in schools and early childhood teacher education programs

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of British Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 44, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Herein, we present data from two studies of Twitter usage in different postsecondary courses with the goal of analyzing the relationships surrounding student engagement and collaboration as they intersect learning outcomes. Study 1 was conducted with 125 students taking a first-year seminar course, half of who were required to use Twitter while the other half used Ning. Study 2 was conducted with 135 students taking a large lecture general education course where Twitter participation was voluntary. Faculty in Study 1 engaged with students on Twitter in activities based on an a priori theoretical model, while faculty in Study 2 only engaged students sporadically on the platform. Qualitative analyses of tweets and quantitative outcomes show that faculty participation on the platform, integration of Twitter into the course based on a theoretically driven pedagogical model and requiring students to use Twitter are essential components of improved outcomes.

Practitioner notes

What is already known about this topic

* Student use of social media is integrally related to how students engage the world.

* Little research exists on how social media use is linked to college student engagement in relation to academic outcomes.

* One study using a controlled design demonstrated a relationship between Twitter use and student engagement.

What this paper adds

* An empirical comparison of two ways in which Twitter was differently integrated into college courses.

* The utilization of quantitative and qualitative data to assess real-world academic outcomes related to Twitter use.

* Evidence-based best practices for using Twitter in educationally relevant and productive ways.

Implications for practice and/or policy

* If integrating Twitter in their courses, faculty should require and structure its use along educationally relevant criteria.

* To achieve the most effective results, faculty should have a theoretically driven pedagogical basis for incorporating Twitter.

* Faculty should actively engage with students on the platform to obtain maximum benefit.

In celebration of this past weekend's time change!

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of the British Journal of Educational Psychology (Volume 83, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

Background. Chronotype refers to individuals' preference for morning or evening activities. Its two dimensions (morningness and eveningness) are related to a number of academic outcomes.

Aims. The main goal of the study was to investigate the incremental validity of chronotype as a predictor of academic achievement after controlling for a number of traditional predictors. In so doing, a further aim was ongoing validation of a chronotype questionnaire, the Lark‐Owl Chronotype Indicator.

Sample. The sample comprised 272 students attending 9th and 10th grades at five German high schools. Data was also obtained from 132 parents of these students.

Method. Students were assessed in class via self‐report questionnaires and a standardized cognitive test. Parents filled out a questionnaire at home. The incremental validity of chronotype was investigated using hierarchical linear regression. Validity of the chronotype questionnaire was assessed by correlating student ratings of their chronotype with behavioural data on sleep, food intake, and drug consumption and with parent ratings of chronotype.

Results. Eveningness was a significant (negative) predictor of overall grade point average (GPA), math-science GPA, and language GPA, after cognitive ability, conscientiousness, need for cognition, achievement motivation, and gender were held constant. Validity evidence for the chronotype measure was established by significant correlations with parent‐ratings and behavioural data.

Conclusions. Results point to the possible discrimination of adolescents with a proclivity towards eveningness at school. Possible explanations for the relationship between chronotype and academic achievement are presented. Implications for educational practice are also discussed.

This journal article appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of the Physical & Health Education Journal (Volume 77, Issue Number 4).

Abstract:

What is the state of Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) in Canada today? Who are today's graduates of PETE programs and what competencies do they possess when they finish their post-secondary degree requirements? In addition, who are the teacher educators responsible for the preparation of tomorrow's Physical Education teachers? These are but a few of the questions that were the focus of a panel presentation conducted at the 2010 Physical and Health Education national conference held in Toronto. Through the leadership of four respected professors of physical education pedagogy, from four different university institutions, a very insightful, informative and interactive presentation was conducted. Each panelist provided an overview and shared insights regarding his or her respective PETE programs. Following the four program overviews, participants were arranged into small groups and leading questions were provided to facilitate interactive discussions regarding PETE programming. Responses from the small group sessions were then shared with the large group. To conclude the panel presentation, the participants completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire was a way of collecting information that could be analyzed and subsequently interpreted to assist in providing a snapshot of the present reality of PETE in Canada. Interestingly, one of the most striking outcomes from the presentation, and at the request of the participants, was the need and willingness to continue this type of conversation about PETE programs in Canada. Thus, the panelists suggested that the information gleaned from the questionnaires would be analyzed and shared in the form of an article to appear in the PHE Journal in advance of the next national conference. In addition, it was also suggested that another panel presentation be conducted at die next TAPHE and PHE Canada National Conference to be held in Halifax in May 2012. A large number of the participants wholeheartedly agreed to come prepared to engage in what is deemed to be a critically important issue - the professional preparation of Canada's future physical education teachers.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance (Volume 18, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

In this article, we consider the aesthetic, political and pedagogical strengths of a verbatim theatre performance, The Middle Place by Project: Humanity, a play that explores the experiences of shelter youth in Toronto, Canada. This ethnographic study moved from drama classrooms into theatres and charted audience responses to the production, its pre- and post-show programming and the company's curation of the theatre space. Using data from post-performance interviews with youth, we analyse how young people articulate the impact of socially engaged theatre. And pulling from ethnographic fieldnotes and researcher email correspondence, we further illustrate how the mere presence of youth and shelter youth at the theatre altered the ways in which audiences interacted with the play and the extended programming, disrupting the usual social contract of theatre-going. Project: Humanity's intentional mix of social classes and ages among the audience created encounters that have much to teach us about theatre's ability to unleash the 'unruly' and to artistically re-create a world highly recognisable to those who inhabit it.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of The Journal of School Health (Volume 83, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Canadian Aboriginal youth have poorer diet quality and higher rates of overweight and obesity than the general population. This research aimed to assess the impact of simple food provision programs on the intakes of milk and alternatives among youth in Kashechewan and Attawapiskat First Nations (FNs), Ontario, Canada. A pilot school snack program was initiated in Kashechewan in May 2009 including coordinator training and grant writing support. A supplementary milk and alternatives program was initiated in Attawapiskat in February 2010. Changes in dietary intake were assessed using Web-based 24-hour dietary recalls in grade 6 to 8 students, pre- and 1-week post-program, with a 1-year follow-up in Kashechewan. Student impressions were collected after 1 week using open-ended questions in the Web survey. Teacher and administrator impressions were collected via focus groups after 1 year in Kashechewan. After 1 week, calcium intake increased in Kashechewan (805.9 ± 552.0 to 1027.6 ± 603.7 mg, p = .044); however, improvements were not sustained at 1 year; milk and alternatives (1.7 ± 1.7 servings to 2.1 ± 1.4 servings, p = .034) and vitamin D (2.5 ± 2.6 to 3.5 ± 3.4 μg, p = .022) intakes increased in Attawapiskat. Impressions of the programs were positive, though limited resources, staff, facilities, and funding were barriers to sustaining the consistent snack provision of the 1-week pilot phase. These illustrations show the potential of snack programs to address the low intakes of milk and alternatives among youth in remote FNs. Community-level constraints must be addressed for sustained program benefits.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of Journal of Education for Teaching (Volume 39, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

Neoliberal agendas, globalism and the marketisation of higher education have had profound implications for teacher education throughout the world, including increasing standardisation, accountability and credentialism. The rhetoric is 'teachers need better training'. However, raising the bar to a master's degree without analysing carefully the rationale for such a reform seems short-sighted. What alternatives are there to a master's degree as a standard in teacher accreditation? What are the significant issues facing learners of the twenty-first century? In a post 9/11 world, with drastic changes stemming from globalisation, what is important? Teachers need global citizenship education to nurture global citizens who have the knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate phenomena in a rapidly changing world. In this paper, a narrative case study of a unique initial teacher education programme at a Japanese university is juxtaposed with discussion of a well-established Canadian programme offering multiple pathways into teaching. The results show that effective teacher induction integrating global citizenship education and providing a gradual acculturation into teaching is possible within undergraduate programmes, providing opportunities for sharing the transcultural personal, practical and professional knowledge of teachers.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of The Canadian Modern Language Review / La revue canadienne des langues vivantes (Volume 69, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

Many believe that the best way to learn a language is to study it in a country where that language is widely spoken. Underlying this belief is the assumption that study in a naturalistic setting will provide learners with ample opportunities for exposure to the target language and interaction with native-speakers of that language. This article reports the findings from a longitudinal study of the quantity and quality of exposure experienced by 17 Chinese graduate students at a Canadian university. Exposure was measured using a computerized log that participants completed once a month for one week, over a six-month period. Our findings show a general trend toward receptive rather than interactive use of English, and considerable variation among individuals in terms of the amount and type of language use. The discussion explores possible reasons for participants' relatively low amount of oral interaction in English in this naturalistic setting.

Résumé:

L'opinion selon laquelle le meilleur moyen d'apprendre une langue est d'étudier dans un pays où cette langue est parlée par un grand nombre de locuteurs est très répandue. Une telle croyance repose sur la supposition que l'étude de la langue dans ses conditions naturelles expose largement l'apprenant à la langue cible et lui offre de nombreuses occasions d'interagir avec les locuteurs natifs. Cet article fait état des résultats d'une étude longitudinale portant sur la quantité et la qualité de l'exposition à la langue de 17 étudiants chinois inscrits aux cycles supérieurs dans une université canadienne. L'exposition a été mesurée au moyen d'un journal informatisé que les participants ont rempli pendant une semaine chaque mois, sur une période de six mois. Les résultats montrent une tendance généralisée à l'usage réceptif plutôt qu'interactif de l'anglais, et des variations considérables entre les individus en ce qui concerne le nombre d'occurrences et le type de langage utilisé. La discussion porte sur les raisons qui pourraient expliquer la quantité plutôt faible d'interactions orales en anglais dans ces conditions naturelles.

This journal article appears in a 2013 issue of Journal for Specialists in Group Work (Volume 38, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

This article describes a study that explored the use of mixed-gender co-facilitation in intimate partner violence groups, especially regarding its potential for gender role socialization. Using an interpretive approach, interviews with men from different mixed-gender co-facilitated groups in Canada were analyzed, with a focus on the men's perceptions of the co-facilitators' attitudes and behaviors in promoting therapeutic interactions. Analysis revealed these interactions were beneficial with respect to the men's problem with violence, group leader support, and group dynamics, and that the difficulties with the group process are not insurmountable. Implications for research and practice are explored and limitations are discussed.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of the European Journal of Education (Volume 48, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

Countries with similar levels of economic development often implement different education ICT policies. Much of the existing research attributes such differences to economic and political factors. In this paper, we examine the development of ICT policy and implementation in the two parts of Ireland and in two Canadian provinces and find that historical, social and cultural differences also play an important role in the way ICT policies develop. In particular, we see differing historical perceptions of the role of the state and church in education playing a more important role than has hitherto been recognized.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education (Volume 43, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Germany's vocational education and training (VET) and corresponding teacher-education programmes are known worldwide for their integrated framework. Government legislation unifies companies, unions and vocational schools, and specifies the education and training required for students as well as vocational teachers. Changing from the Diplom programme model to the Anglophone Bachelor and Masters degree model has raised concerns for VET teacher preparation. It is within this context that we explore Germany's VET teacher-education system and current academic debates. We further investigate challenges in the development of Canada's VET teacher-education programmes and suggest some policy borrowing from the German model.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of the British Journal of Religious Education (Volume 35, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Religious education (RE) in Catholic high schools in Australia and Canada is compared by examining some of the underlying structural factors that shape the delivery of RE. It is argued that in Canadian Catholic schools RE is diminished by three factors that distinguish it from the Australian experience. These are: the level and history of government funding which in turn leads to a relative lack of autonomy of Catholic schools to control their own RE curriculum; external political and social influences on the RE curriculum which is apparent in the popular election of Catholic school trustees; and most decisively, the absence of strong, ongoing bureaucratic support of RE.

Check out the Education Librarian's TIES@Western Poster

Denise Horoky and Christena McKillop created a poster for TIES@Western: ENABLE, DISCOVER, CONNECT: Education Academic Librarians Embrace Evolving Technology

Technology in Education Symposium at Western ~ TIES@Western

TIES@Western is an exciting one-day, university-wide event scheduled for Friday March 8, 2013, which will showcase and explore the uses of technology in teaching graduate, undergraduate, and continuing studies students across all disciplines at Western and its affiliates.

Participants will hear and see how instructors and others employ technology to engage students and enrich learning, and to connect with others from across the campus who are exploring the potential of instructional technology and online education.

Free parking in the two parking lots, North and South.

Don't park in the front of the building... you will have to pay.

Technology in Education Symposium - Friday March 8, 2013

Keynote Speaker:

mike.jpg

Dubbed "the explainer" by Wired magazine, Michael Wesch is a cultural anthropologist exploring the impact of new media on society and culture.
After two years studying the impact of writing on a remote indigenous culture in the rain forest of Papua New Guinea, he has turned his attention to the effects of social media and digital technology on global society. His videos on technology, education, and information have been viewed by millions, translated in over ten languages, and are frequently featured at international film festivals and major academic conferences worldwide. Wesch has won several major awards for his work, including a Wired Magazine Rave Award, the John Culkin Award for Outstanding Praxis in Media Ecology, and was recently named an Emerging Explorer by National Geographic. He has also won several teaching awards, including the 2008 CASE/Carnegie U.S. Professor of the Year for Doctoral and Research Universities.

This journal article appeared in the February 2013 issue of Interactive Learning Environments (Volume 21, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

We developed an embodied interactive video game (EIVG) that is both educational and entertaining with the hope of using such a system to compare blended and pure digital learning with respect to differences in learning effectiveness. In addition to conducting experiments wherein the children learned using the EIVG, we also involved teachers as part of the study to allow observation of the emotional aspects of the children. The results of the study can be summarized by the following three points: (1) the effectiveness of blended learning was superior to that of pure digital learning; (2) the effectiveness of EIVG learning was better for boys than it was for girls, although the differences between them were not significant; and (3) the EIVG was highly entertaining, which resulted in students remaining highly interested and focused throughout the study. It is worth noting that both types of learning can be effective.

Going blended: new challenges for second generation L2 tutors

This journal article appeared in the April 2012 issue of Computer Assisted Language Learning (Volume 25, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

This study explores how second generation tutors within blended learning courses link the face-to-face and online course modalities - in their representations as well as through their pedagogical activities - and which aspects help them to feel involved in the course. The methodology used is a qualitative analysis of interviews with seven tutors of three different blended learning courses. The results show that most tutors indeed had difficulties gaining a deeper insight into the course design: they considered the face-to-face modality to be the central one, just as in a traditional L2 course (whereas course design was centred on the online modality), and therefore rarely played their role as online tutors. Moreover, their understanding of the courses' task-based approach appeared to be limited. Nevertheless, the majority of the tutors managed to feel involved in the course, which shows the importance of additional factors in defining their relationship to the course. We identified eight other factors, which are partly due to the intense use of ICT within the course (as shown by a comparison with two additional interviews with e-learning-tutors), and partly depend specifically on the blended learning mode. This study furthers our understanding of difficulties tutors can have and what support they require within blended language learning settings, although further research will be needed in order to permit greater generalisation.

This journal article appeared in the August 2012 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 59, Issue Number 1).

Abstract

This study reviewed qualitative studies that focused on strategies to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate technology into their lessons. A meta-ethnography approach was utilized to locate, critically appraise, and synthesize the results of these studies. Based on an extensive search in the Web of Science, 19 articles were included in this synthesis. The results were divided into two parts: (1) key themes explicitly related to the preparation of pre-service teachers (e.g., using teacher educators as role models, learning technology by design, scaffolding authentic technology experiences), and (2) conditions necessary at the institutional level (e.g., technology planning and leadership, co-operation within and between institutions, training staff). To present how these key themes related to each other, an overarching model was developed. By interpreting the results of the review, recommendations were discussed for pre-service teacher technology training and future research.

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 62).

Abstract:

This study investigated entering preservice teachers' initial beliefs and ideas with regard to the role of technology in teaching and learning. It also examined specific technology-integrated pedagogical strategies and their potential to help preservice teachers begin to shift from traditional teacher-centered beliefs to a more student-centered mindset. The work was conducted in the context of an introductory educational technology course for preservice teachers in a Mid-Atlantic University in the United States. Data sources included pre- and post-course drawings where participants depicted themselves as technology-using teachers, drawing reflections, and weekly reflective entries submitted in response to a blogging assignment. Findings indicated that preservice teachers enter their training programs with traditional, teacher-centered beliefs about the use of technology and the roles of technology-using teachers and students. Analysis of post-course drawings, however, indicated that participants' beliefs began to shift from largely teacher-centered to more mixed teacher- and student-centered. Analysis of reflective blog entries also demonstrated that participants reflected predominantly on how technology can provide opportunities for students, teachers and parents to collaborate. To a lesser extent, participants reflected on how technology can enhance teaching and learning. Based on these findings, implications specifically related to stand alone technology courses and teacher education programs are discussed.

This journal article appears in the April 2013 issue of The Internet and Higher Education (Volume 17).


Abstract:

To maximize the quality of the online experience and actualize the potential of alternative learning environments at their institutions, administrators must explore the perceived experiences of the members of their online learning communities. The overall purpose of the study was to identify factors that would enhance student and instructor experiences in online environments. The focus of the survey was to obtain information from students about their perceptions of the online and blended courses that they participated in and insights from instructors about online and blended courses that they taught. The data collected in this survey reveal optimal areas where a university administration can partner closely with instructors to enhance the student experience in online learning environments and afford online instructors with adequate support and assistance.

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of The Internet and Higher Education (Volume 14, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

It is not uncommon that researchers face difficulties when performing meaningful cross-study comparisons for research. Research associated with the distance learning realm can be even more difficult to use as there are different environments with a variety of characteristics. We implemented a mixed-method analysis of research articles to find out how they define the learning environment. In addition, we surveyed 43 persons and discovered that there was inconsistent use of terminology for different types of delivery modes. The results reveal that there are different expectations and perceptions of learning environment labels: distance learning, e-Learning, and online learning.

This journal article appeared in the January 2013 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 60, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

The research purpose is to investigate learner self-regulation in e-learning environments. In order to better understand learner attitudes toward e-learning, 196 university students answer a questionnaire survey after use an e-learning system few months. The statistical results showed that perceived satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and interactive learning environments were all found to predict perceived self-regulation in e-learning environments. Further, perceived usefulness can be influenced by interactive learning environments, perceived self-efficacy, and perceived satisfaction. In addition, perceived satisfaction can be affected by interactive learning environments, perceived self-efficacy, and perceived anxiety. Finally, the study proposes a conceptual model to investigate learner self-regulation in e-learning environments.

This journal article appeared in the December 2012 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 59, Issue Number 4).

Abstract:

This case study examines 18 elementary school teachers' perceptions of the barriers to technology integration (access, vision, professional development, time, and beliefs) and instructional practices with technology after two years of situated professional development. Months after transitioning from mentoring to teacher-led communities of practice, teachers continued to report positive perceptions of several barriers and were observed engaging in desirable instructional practices. Interviews suggest that the situated professional development activities helped create an environment that supported teachers' decisions to integrate technology. Implications for teacher professional development and technology integration are discussed in conjunction with the strengths and limitations of the study.

The journal article appeared in the September 2012 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 59, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

Researchers have called for renewed efforts in exploring both what knowledge should be taught in preservice teacher education programs with regard to technology, and how to best prepare teachers to effectively use that knowledge to support teaching and learning. This study compared the importance of technology topics from teacher educators and teachers' perspectives. A two-phase mixed-methods research design utilized surveys and multiple case studies (interviews, documents) to collect data from both teacher educators and practicing teachers. Findings indicate that teachers and teacher educators demonstrated similarities in their views regarding the use of technology for personal productivity, information presentation, and the access and use of electronic resources to support teaching and learning. Teacher educators and teachers differed with regard to their use of technology for communication, analysis of student data, documenting professional growth, and facilitating higher-order thinking skills. Recommendations for how teacher education programs can incorporate and address technology topics in order to increase relevance for teachers are discussed.

Is Social Media Too Social for Class? A Case Study of Twitter Use

This journal article appears in the March 2013 issue of TechTrends (Volume 57, Issue Number 2).

Abstract:

This qualitative case study examined Twitter use by undergraduate and graduate students in three classes. Previous studies have shown that while some faculty use Twitter, few are incorporating it into classes despite many recommendations for such use. This study examined how students perceived Twitter as a classroomtool. As an optional activity, many started with Twitter but fewer continued through the semester. The study reports on content and counts of tweets as well as student self-reports on usage and interest. The researchers found students enjoyed being consumers of tweets but seldom retweeted or replied. Incorporating Twitter in courses will require careful consideration of scaffolding, modeling, privacy and course design. Questions remain as to whether the informal social focus of Twitter may overwhelm attempts to use it in more structured educational settings

Improving K-12 pedagogy via a Cloud designed for education

This journal article appears in the February 2013 issue of International Journal of Information Management (Volume 33, Issue Number 1)

Abstract

Cloud computing offers an opportunity to improve K-12 pedagogy with services tailored to teachers' needs in individual classrooms. The Cloud can deliver services such as remote access to learning tools in a cost effective manner to school systems struggling with reductions in local and state funding. This article explores the distinct ways that a Cloud designed specifically for education can be applied to K-12 education's academic mission. It uses observations from a case study in North Carolina rural high schools using an educational Cloud called the Virtual Computing Lab to access dynamic geometry and algebra software.

Teacher adoption of technology

This journal article appears in the May 2013 issue of Computers in Human Behavior (Volume 29, Issue Number 3)

Abstract:

Technology adoption is usually modeled as a process with dynamic transitions between costs and benefits. Nevertheless, school teachers do not generally make effective use of technology in their teaching. This article describes a study designed to exhibit the interplay between two variables: the type of technology, in terms of its complexity of use, and the type of teacher, in terms of attitude towards innovation. The results from this study include: (a) elaboration of a characteristic teacher technology adoption process, based on an existing learning curve for new technology proposed for software development; and (b) presentation of exit points during the technology adoption process. This paper concludes that teachers who are early technology adopters and commit a significant portion of their time to incorporating educational technology into their teaching are more likely to adopt new technology, regardless of its complexity. However, teachers who are not early technology adopters and commit a small portion of their time to integrating educational technology are less likely to adopt new technology and are prone to abandoning the adoption at identified points in the process.

This journal article appears in the May 2013 issue of Computers in Human Behavior (Volume 29, Issue Number 3):

Abstract:

Limited research has been conducted on the integration of Tablet-PCs in classroom instruction. This paper reports a qualitative study which investigates the acceptance of Tablet-PCs, seen as technological innovation, amongst teachers. The research approach intends to complement research on the acceptance of technology through a more detailed qualitative examination. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 teachers during a pilot project introducing Tablet-PCs to classroom instruction at three different schools. The findings indicate diversity in the attitude of teachers towards the technology, but also with regards to the performance expectancy and the facilitating conditions.

This journal article appears in the April 2013 issue of Computer Assisted Language Learning (Volume 26, Issue Number 2):

Abstract:

Today Web 2.0 technologies, including blogs, are presenting both teachers and learners with new horizons in the field of language teaching and learning. A blog is an online journal which can be continuously updated by its users [Matheson, D. (2004). Weblogs and the epistemology of the news: Some trends in online journalism. New Media & Society, 6, 443-468.]. Blogs are easy to construct without the need of understanding HTML, and their appearance and content can be enhanced through the use of pictures, audio and video files. Due to their asynchronous nature, blogs allow people to write and publish their thoughts and views at their own pace without space and time constraints. In language learning, the use of blogs is considered to be similar to that of journal writing [McLeod, 2001; as cited in Lowe, C. (2004). Moving to the public: Weblogs in the writing classroom. Into the Blogosphere. Retrieved April 16, 2009, fromhttp://Blog.lib.umn.edu//blogosphere/moving_to_public_pf.html]. Hence, students use the basis of their worldviews to shape and interpret their own meanings in writing. Using task-based activities to encourage students' interaction, the present study explores how a blog as a computer-mediated tool engages a group of English as a Foreign Language learners at a language school in Spain in reflective and collaborative learning. Eleven students who were preparing for the Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) Cambridge examination were involved in a study that lasted for five months. All the participants created their personal blogs so that they could read each other's views, share ideas and comment on their peers' postings. The activities focused on the specific writing tasks (letter writing, report, proposal, article, etc.) comprised in the aforementioned examination. Consequently, the project aimed to (1) enhance writing skills in specific writing tasks, (2) perceive the effect of the learners' feedback and (3) foster collaborative skills. Drawing on the triangulated data collated from the blog entries, class discussions based on peers' feedback and questionnaires, this paper argues that personal blogs can motivate students to build their writing skills through self-reflection and peer feedback. The engagement in negotiation of meaning between peers led to better planning and the choice of the right register/style required in each task prior to writing and submitting their work. Collaborative skills were also fostered through students' regular interaction in the blogs. For meaningful learning to take place, pedagogical intervention could encourage students to take their peers' comments into account so that they can edit their own work with a view to enhancing their writing tasks and producing mistake-free texts.

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