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December 12, 2011

Holiday Hiatus

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
See you again on these pages in early January 2012.

Summon Software Linking Changes

If you use Summon please ~ read carefully.


Library staff received this information about a Summon change in linking:

"A couple of weeks ago Summon changed the way they link to articles for some full text sources, including ProQuest and Science Direct.


They now provide DIRECT links to the content, instead of always going through "Get it @ Western", the way they did before.

What this means for our users is that off-campus users now CANNOT access ProQuest (or some other) content without logging in to the proxy server first. Since most users don't know that, and they didn't have to before, we have started to get questions about how to log in to ProQuest.

So, if you get a question from a user about how to log in to ProQuest, tell the user that they have to log in to the proxy server BEFORE they click on the links in Summon, and everything will work the way it is supposed to."

Hours of Opening During December

The Education Library changes hours of opening in the month of December. If you are planning a research visit to the Education Library you are advised to first check the Western Libraries' website for complete details.

Exporting from PsycInfo to RefWorks: Problems Have Been Fixed

The problems reported last week related to exporting from PsycInfo to RefWorks have been fixed. If you have any questions, please ask the staff at the Education Library's Service Desk.

New Book ~ Literacy Research Methodologies (Second Edition)

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This summary is from the publisher's website:

The definitive reference on literacy research methods, this book serves as a key resource for researchers and as a text in graduate-level courses. Distinguished scholars clearly describe established and emerging methodologies, discuss the types of questions and claims for which each is best suited, identify standards of quality, and present exemplary studies that illustrate the approaches at their best. The book demonstrates how each mode of inquiry can yield unique insights into literacy learning and teaching and how the methods can work together to move the field forward.

December 8, 2011

"Save Library and Archives Canada" Campaign

The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) unveiled a national campaign to protect Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

"Save Library and Archives Canada" is being launched by CAUT in response to funding cuts and internal managerial decisions that are threatening the quality and integrity of Canada's only national public library and archives.

"Badly conceived restructuring, a narrowing of its mandate, and financial cutbacks are undermining LAC's ability to acquire, preserve and make publicly available Canada's full documentary heritage," James L. Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers said at a news conference in Ottawa.

These changes, Turk added, have already led to a reduction in the number of specialist archivists and librarians, reduced public access and services, and the loss of rare and important materials.

Teaching Innovation Projects (TIPS) Journal

TIPS is an open-access journal arising from the Advanced Teaching Program within the Teaching Support Centre of The University of Western Ontario.

It publishes articles that describe the scholarly and pedagogical foundations for workshops about a variety of timely educational topics and include a comprehensive list of learning outcomes, an annotated review of relevant literature, and a detailed breakdown of potential learning activities among other elements.


The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success

The book "The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success" is a clear, understandable six-step method for streamlining the literature review process! Click on the title link above to find the call number and the circulation status (is it signed out to a student or not?) of this book.

Written in user-friendly language, this book offers master's and doctoral level students in education and the social sciences a road map to developing and writing an effective literature review for a research project, thesis, or dissertation.

Organized around a comprehensive and detailed six-step developmental model, the book provides guided exercises, graphics, charts, and examples from the everyday experiences of practitioners.

Both novice and experienced researchers will find invaluable assistance for:

Selecting a topic
Searching the literature
Developing arguments
Surveying the literature
Critiquing the literature
Writing the literature review


And, of course, for more personalized help about your particular research interests, you can always call or email to arrange a research consultation with one of the Education Academic Librarians - you will be glad you did!

RefWorks Problems

RefWorks is not working as it should and you may encounter some problems when working with the software. The appropriate people have been notified and they are working on a solution. Unfortunately, there is no timeline for resolution.

The Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly updated - have a look! The content on our Facebook page is very different from the content of this Blog, and very different from the information we provide under our RECENT NEWS heading on the Education Library's website.

And, I Quote...

"I have long contended that a room full of books is simply a closet but that an empty room with a librarian in it is a library."

R. David Lankes is a professor and Dean's Scholar for the New Librarianship at Syracuse University's School of Information Studies, the director of the library science program for the school and director of the Information Institute of Syracuse. Lankes is a passionate advocate for librarians and their essential role in today's society.

The Librarian is reading...

...R. David Lankes.

The Education Library's Hours of Opening Change in December

When planning your research and library visits - check the website for complete details of December and Holiday hours of operation.

December 7, 2011

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescent School Victimization: Implications for Young Adult Health and Adjustment

This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of The Journal of School Health (Volume 81, Number 5).

Abstract:

Adolescent school victimization due to lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) status is commonplace, and is associated with compromised health and adjustment. Few studies have examined the long-term implications of LGBT school victimization for young adult adjustment. We examine the association between reports of LGBT school victimization and young adult psychosocial health and risk behavior. The young adult survey from the Family Acceptance Project included 245 LGBT young adults between the ages of 21 and 25 years, with an equal proportion of Latino and non-Latino White respondents. A 10-item retrospective scale assessed school victimization due to actual or perceived LGBT identity between the ages of 13 and 19 years. Multiple regression was used to test the association between LGBT school victimization and young adult depression, suicidal ideation, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social integration, while controlling for background characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine young adult suicide attempts, clinical levels of depression, heavy drinking and substance use problems, sexually transmitted disease (STD) diagnoses, and self-reported HIV risk. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender-related school victimization is strongly linked to young adult mental health and risk for STDs and HIV; there is no strong association with substance use or abuse. Elevated levels of depression and suicidal ideation among males can be explained by their high rates of LGBT school victimization. Reducing LGBT-related school victimization will likely result in significant long-term health gains and will reduce health disparities for LGBT people. Reducing the dramatic disparities for LGBT youth should be educational and public health priorities.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: Hispanic Americans, Teenagers, Mental health, Gays & lesbians, Sexual behavior, Transgendered persons, Young adults, Adjustment

Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

This article appeared in the June 2011 issue of School Psychology Quarterly (Volume 26, Number 2).

Abstract:

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to lower levels of problematic substance use, depressive symptoms, and psychological distress. Using a sample of 145 LGBT youth recruited from college and university organizations for LGBT students, we examined whether attending a high school with a GSA was related to more positive school experiences and mental health outcomes for LGBT youth. The results indicate that youth who attended a high school with a GSA report significantly more favorable outcomes related to school experiences, alcohol use, and psychological distress. The implications of the findings are discussed as they relate to school psychologists. Important limitations of this study are reviewed.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: At risk youth, LGBTQ studies, Health behavior, Educational psychology, Student organizations

Analyzing Talk in a Long-Term Literature Discussion Group: Ways of Operating Within LGBT-Inclusive and Queer Discourses

This journal article appeared in the July - September 2011 issue of Reading Research Quarterly (Volume 46, Number 3).

Abstract:

Scholars have argued for reading and discussing children's and young adult literature containing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or questioning (LGBTQ) characters and related themes with youths. Yet, we know very little about how to do this among LGBTQ people and their allies. This study examined 18 transcripts of talk from a literature discussion group of 32 adolescents and adults, including the authors, using 24 texts over 3 years in an LGBTQ youth center. The goal was to identify the nature of the talk and the ways it was liberatory and/or oppressive. A Foucaultian analysis of the talk, combined with ethnographically collected information, was conducted, identifying discourses, uses, and ways of operating to reveal possibilities and limitations of LGBT-inclusive and queering discourses. Findings suggest a complex, reciprocal process among texts, talk, and context in which no discourse is monolithically liberatory or oppressive. Complementary and competing discourses in conversation with each other around diverse texts and in complex contexts, however, provide opportunities for conflicts and potential for change.

Environmental Influences on the Development of Female College Students Who Identify as Multiracial/Biracial-Bisexual/Pansexual

This article appeared in the July/August 2011 issue of Journal of College Student Development (Volume 52, Number 4).

Abstract:

Using Renn's (2000, 2004) ecology of college student development model as a theoretical framework, I report and discuss the findings of my study involving 6 female college students who identify as multiracial/biracial-bisexual/pansexual. I describe how these findings validate Renn's model, specifically discussing how the campus environment influenced the students' identity development in relation to three themes that emerged from my study: trying on, negotiating self, and finding fit. Finally, I discuss the implications of the results of my study for student affairs practice.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: College students, Bisexuality, Studies, Race relations, Ecology, Research & development--R&D, Society, Sexuality, Homosexuality

Effects of Family and Friend Support on LGB Youths' Mental Health and Sexual Orientation Milestones

This journal article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Family Relations (Volume 60, Number 3).

Abstract:

This study examined the effects of social support components and providers on mental health and sexual orientation (SO) milestones of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths. Data were collected on 461 self-identified LGB adolescents and young adults. Family acceptance and support yielded the strongest positive effect on self-acceptance of SO, whereas friends' support and acceptance yielded the strongest positive effect on disclosure of SO. Family support had the strongest negative effect on youth's mental distress, whereas friends' and family support had the strongest positive effect on well-being. These findings highlight the importance of the daily perceptions of LGB youth within social and familial settings, indicating that both positive and negative aspects of support affect youths' mental health and identity development.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this article: Stress, Social support, Studies, Mental health, Sexual orientation, Homophobia, Attitudes, Consolidation

Creating Safe Environments for Students With Disabilities Who Identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of Intervention in School and Clinic (Volume 47, Number 1).

Abstract:

Adolescence is an important time in human development. Teenagers spend much time questioning their core belief structures and developing the foundations of their identity. For students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), this path of development is difficult in American schools because of strongly held homophobic beliefs. Barriers in sexuality identity development could cause problems for students with disabilities, including low self-esteem, psychological problems, and suicidal ideations. This article addresses action steps that educators can take to support this student population.

Here are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: sexuality education, cultural and linguistic diversity, classroom management, classroom environment

Gender Expression and Homophobia: A Motor Development and Learning Perspective: Boys and Girls Should Not be Expected to Move a Certain Way Based on Gender-Stereotyped Roles and Expressions

This article appeared in the October 2011 issue of JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (Volume 82, Number 8).

Abstract:

It cannot be ignored that some individuals in our society, including among the children and teens we teach and coach, are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT). Being LGBT is just another difference among students (such as race, mental/physical challenges, gender, or religion) that teachers and coaches must acknowledge and address. Homosexuality and homophobia are rarely discussed in schools, yet they are relevant in motor-development and motor-learning settings because people hold gender-stereotyped beliefs about movement and about LGBT individuals. Few educational curricula address these topics directly, yet we expect physical education teachers and coaches to know how to deal with these differences among their students.


In this article, I will address homophobia and related stereotypes in physical education settings by identifying several misconceptions people hold about sex, gender, and homosexuality; describing stereotypical gender-specific expressions about movement; and providing suggestions for teachers to help children and parents develop movement freely.

The Association Between Same-Sex Romantic Attractions and Relationships and Running Away Among a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescents

This article appears in the December 2011 issue of Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (Volume 28, Number 6).

Abstract:

Sexual minorities are overrepresented among the runaway population, and sexual minority runaways are at greater risk for adverse health outcomes than their heterosexual peers. Our knowledge of this vulnerable population has been restricted by methodological limitations of existing studies. This study used a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents to explore the association between same-sex romantic attractions and relationships and run away behavior over a 2 year period. Results indicated that although the association between sexual orientation and running away appears to be partially attenuated by other risk factors for running away, there remains a significant positive association between same-sex romantic attractions and running away. Furthermore, youth with no romantic or sexual relationships were significantly less likely to report running away compared to youth with only opposite-sex relationships. These associations remained significant even after controlling for other risk factors.

The KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal are Runaways,Sexual minorities, Adolescents, Adolescent Health

December 2, 2011

"You Live Where?!" Lesbian Mothers' Attachment to Nonmetropolitan Communities

This journal article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Family Relations (Volume 60, Issue 4).

Abstract:

A positive attachment to one's residential community has been linked to better mental health (McLaren, 2009), stronger social support (Young, Russell, & Powers, 2004), and a higher quality of life (Mak, Cheung, & Law, 2009). Attachment to residential community has been understudied in research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families. The current study attempts to fill this gap by using family and minority stress theories to examine the predictors of residential community attachment among 77 lesbian mothers living in nonmetropolitan communities. Our findings indicate that stronger residential community attachment is predicted by more frequent contact with family of origin, low religiosity, and an interaction between close LGBT friendships and the presence of at least one local LGBT organization. Contrary to expectations, anti-LGBT victimization perpetrated by community members did not have an effect on residential community attachment.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this article: attachment to community; family of origin; LGBT community; lesbian mothers; nonmetropolitan; religiosity

Inequities in Educational and Psychological Outcomes Between LGBTQ and Straight Students in Middle and High School

This journal article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Educational Researcher (Volume 40, Number 7).

Abstract:

This study finds that, compared with straight-identified youth, youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) are at greater risk of suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, victimization by peers, and elevated levels of unexcused absences from school. Results disaggregated by LGBTQ subgroups reveal heterogeneity within the broad LGBTQ group, with bisexual youth appearing to be particularly at risk. Also, although the risk gaps in school belongingness and unexcused absences are significant in high school, we find that these gaps are significantly greater in middle school, suggesting heightened early risk for LGBTQ-identified students. By raising awareness of educational inequities related to LGBTQ identification, this study lays the descriptive groundwork for interventions aimed at improving psychological and educational outcomes for these students.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: at-risk students, gay/lesbian studies, multilevel modeling, stress/coping

"What Do You Say to Them?" Investigating and Supporting the Needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Young People

This article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Journal of Community Psychology (Volume 39, Issue 8).

Abstract:

This study explores the experiences and support needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people living in Sussex (UK), and the training needs of practitioners working with LGBTQ young people. The aims were to explore the experiences of young people including bullying, "coming out," social service and educational needs, and to investigate how practitioners view the needs of LGBTQ young people. Twenty-nine interviews were conducted and analyzed thematically. Participants stressed the social and health impact of discrimination and bullying on young people as well as barriers faced in accessing services. Young people require support, yet practitioners lack the training to provide that support. Practitioners are open to this training and both groups of participants believe effective training should include youth in the development and delivery. There is an urgent need for the development of appropriate and dedicated LGBTQ youth training for all practitioners working with young people.

Bathrooms, Baseball, and Bra Shopping: Lesbian and Gay Parents Talk about Engendering their Children

This journal article appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of Sociological Perspectives (Volume 54, Number 3).

Abstract:

Drawing on an integrated theoretical lens of vocabularies of motive, gender interactionism, and queer theory, the authors explore how eighteen lesbian mothers and twenty-two gay fathers negotiate the cultural narratives of heteronormativity and gender essentialism as they imagine and participate in constructing their children's gender. Findings highlight the extent to which participants' parenting fantasies and realities occur within a context of heightened gender accountability that they manage for their children. The authors show how the practice of securing gender role models for their children is one way that non-heterosexual parents manage this accountability. Next, the authors introduce "queer ruptures" in participants' narratives and detail the subtle ways that they destabilize the existing heteronormative gender order. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for empirical and theoretical development.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Parents & parenting, Sociology, Sex roles, Gays & lesbians, Children & youth

Canadian Counselling Psychologists' Contributions to Applied Psychology

This journal article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Canadian Psychology (Volume 52, Number 4).

Abstract:

In Canadian counselling psychology, the idea of developing MCC in order to work with clients in a more culturally sensitive manner is the most widely used approach. However, some Canadian scholars have reservations about infusing traditional counselling models with specific cultural competencies (e.g., McCormick & Gerlitz, 2009). According to Peavy (1998), traditional approaches that are adapted for counselling with culturally diverse clients are insufficient and even harmful. As a result, Peavy (2003) proposed the idea of intercultural counselling wherein both counsellor and client's interpersonal and communication styles are emphasised. This approach puts forth four tenets for effective intercultural counselling, including (a) the counsellor's ability to navigate two cultures, (b) unification of intercultural counselling principals, (c) inclusion of an emancipatory theme in counselling, and (d) the integration of constructivist counselling practices. Furthermore, Peavy and Li (2003) discussed the five culturalcontextual issues of self-constructural (client self-concept construction based on an individualistic or collectivistic culture), communication and miscommunication, silence, turn-taking and interrupting, as well as grounding (establishing common ground), which they believe are core to intercultural counselling. Ultimately, Peavy and Li (2003) argue that social-contextual factors and the collaborative nature of the helping process are key when engaging in multicultural counselling.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Careers, Multiculturalism & pluralism, Counseling psychology, Psychologists

'It's Not Like We're Going to Jump Them': How Transgressing Heteronormativity Shapes Police Interactions with LGBT Young People

This journal article appears in the December 2011 issue of Youth Justice (Volume 11, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper explores how visibly transgressing heteronormativity shapes police interactions with LGBT young people. While research provides evidence about how sexually and gender diverse bodies can be abused in schools, policing is overlooked. Interviews with 35 LGBT young people demonstrate how bodies transgressing heteronormativity (that is, non-heteronormative bodies) mediate their policing experiences in Queensland, Australia. Drawing on Foucault, Butler, and others, this article suggests police interactions and use of discretion with LGBT young people was informed by non-heteronormative bodies discursively performing queerness in ways read by police. The article concludes noting tensions produced for youthful LGBT bodies in public spaces.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: embodiment, heteronormativity, lesbian gay bisexual transgender (LGBT), police, queer

High School Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) and Young Adult Well-Being: An Examination of GSA Presence, Participation, and Perceived Effectiveness

This journal article appears in a 2011 issue of Applied Developmental Science (Volume 15, Number 4).

Abstract:

Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are student-led, school-based clubs that aim to provide a safe environment in the school context for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, as well as their straight allies. The present study examines the potential for GSAs to support positive youth development and to reduce associations among LGBT-specific school victimization and negative young adult well-being. The sample includes 245 LGBT young adults, ages 21-25, who retrospectively reported on the presence of a GSA in their high school, their participation in their school's GSA, and their perceptions of whether or not their GSA was effective in improving school safety. Findings revealed that the presence of a GSA, participation in a GSA, and perceived GSA effectiveness in promoting school safety were differentially associated with young adult well-being and, in some cases, buffered the negative association between LGBT-specific school victimization and well-being. Implications for future research and schools are discussed.

November 30, 2011

The Librarian is reading...

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Summary from the publisher's website:

Young children are coming of age surrounded by information and communication technology (ICT). ICT is a prominent force in their lives, and working with ICT can stimulate students intellectually, incite their creativity, and challenge them to apply developmentally appropriate inquiry approaches that enhance their learning experiences. Digital technologies also allow children to expand their physical space and access many online social environments that transcend time and space. However, any focus on the efficiency and effectiveness of technology applications in the early childhood years cannot overlook the potential consequences of technological development on children with regard to their social functioning, interpersonal interactions, and global understanding. In addition to evaluating technology as a tool of instruction, we must focus on educational implications and ethical issues associated with their use.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly being updated - have a look!

OECD iLibrary Database

OECD iLibrary is OECD's Online Library for books, papers and statistics and the gateway to OECD's analysis and data. It replaces SourceOECD, and hosts all content so users can find - and cite - tables and databases as easily as articles or chapters.

OECD iLibrary contains all the publications and datasets released by OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), International Energy Agency (IEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), OECD Development Centre, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), and International Transport Forum (ITF).

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually.

You can easily locate DOAJ by clicking on the DATABASES link (there is an alphabetical list of all of the databases available to you) on the Western Libraries' website.

Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests. The field of education is multi-disciplinary and it is very often necessary for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list.

People We Know ~ Special Issue of Language and Literacy

The 2011 issue of Language and Literacy (Volume 13, Number 2) is a Special Issue: Ethical and Social Justice Issues in Language and Literacy Research.

Classroom Contradictions: Popular Media in Ontario Schools' Literacy and Citizenship Education Policies

This journal article appears in the July 2100 issue of Education, Citizenship and Social Justice (Volume 6, Number 2).

Abstract:

In 2003, the Ontario Ministry of Education in Canada began promoting popular media as a pedagogical tool, especially for 'reluctant' readers. This 'pedagogy of the popular' is instituted within a critical media literacy framework that draws on the values and codes of multiculturalism to counter the consumerist messages students encounter in nontraditional texts. The model of civic citizenship promoted by the critical media literacy curriculum, however, fails in its ambitions to provide a counterweight to the neo-liberal model of consumer citizenship. Insofar as its critique is grounded in a multicultural politics of representation, Ontario's media literacy curriculum fails to deeply interrogate the social roots of conflict and discrimination. As a result, it only weakly challenges, and is unlikely to displace, the post-Keynesian-era model of citizenship education in which the values of universality and inclusiveness are subsumed to an ethos that naturalizes the practices and moral codes of the marketplace.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this article: citizenship education, critical media literacy, multiculturalism, popular media

First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education: The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement Approach to Improve Indigenous Education in Alberta

This article appeared in the August 2011 issue of the Journal of Educational Change (Volume 12, Number 3).

Abstract:

The education of minority students is of considerable interest within the literature. Ensuring that all children receive quality programming and that they successfully graduate from school is of concern for parents, educational stakeholders, and society alike. In Canada, the indigenous populations of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (FNMI) students have fallen significantly short of acceptable graduation rates. In an attempt to address this issue, results from 16 selected projects funded by the Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) that focused upon FNMI Education will be discussed. A comprehensive review of the projects suggests that by involving Aboriginal parents and Elders in meaningful ways and by focusing upon Aboriginal language, culture, and history not as an "add-on" but an integral part of Canadian history and culture, Aboriginal students are more likely to remain in school.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: First Nations, Métis, and Inuit education, indigenous education, High school completion

New Book ~ Honoring Our Heritage: Culturally Appropriate Approaches for Teaching Indigenous Students

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Our Faculty of Education researchers may be interested in Chapter 9: "Heightening Awareness and Strengthening Relationships: Implications of Public Policy for Aboriginal Students, Communities and Teachers." The call number for this book is LC1099.H655 2011 and it can be found downstairs in the Education Library's lower level STACKS.

November 29, 2011

Special Education in First Nations Schools in Canada: Policies of Cost Containment

This journal article appeared in the April 2010 issue of the Alberta Journal of Educational Research (Volume 56, Number 1).

Abstract:

The education of First Nations students in Canada on reserve is the legal responsibility of the federal government. This article reviews and critiques the federal government's past and current special education policies and practices in regard to First Nations schools throughout Canada. The author has found that rather than establishing a comprehensive special education system for First Nations schools, the federal government has focused on limiting funding, services, and development. Four themes emerge from this review: (a) lack of willingness on the part of the federal government to honor constitutional obligations and responsibilities in special education to First Nations; (b) focus of providing provincial level of special education services resulted in little consultation with First Nations; (c) limited funding, and (d) lack of respect for First Nations expertise.

Here is a list of the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article:

Financial Support
Special Education
Foreign Countries
Special Needs Students
Government Role
Educational Policy
Resource Allocation
Canada Natives
Federal Government
Legal Responsibility

La Conception De Sites Web Sur La Santé En Contexte Autochtone (The Design Of Health Information Websites For Indigenous Peoples)

This article appeared in the December 2010 issue of Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce, suppl. Special Issue for ICEP 2010 (International Conference, Volume 15, Number 3).

Abstract:

For the indigenous peoples of the Great Canadian North, living far from the major service centers, web sites are essential vehicles for accessing information on health. Ensuring quality design of the websites on health for the indigenous peoples, besides ensuring the quality of their information content, necessitate to adapt their presentation to the cultural context, to define access to the web sites that take into consideration the conditions of particular environment, and establish links with the traditional medicine. This study identifies the foundation that should underlie the development of these websites.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Indigenous peoples, aboriginal culture, health websites, websites design, traditional medicine, user-centered approach.

Aboriginal Children and Their Caregivers Living with Low Income: Outcomes from a Two-Generation Preschool Program

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Journal of Child and Family Studies (Volume 20, Number 3).

Abstract:

The development of preschool children of Aboriginal heritage is jeopardized by the inter-generational transmission of risk that has created, and continues to create, social disadvantage. Early intervention programs are intended to mitigate the impact of social disadvantage. Yet, evidence of the effectiveness of these programs for children of Aboriginal heritage is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a two-generation, multi-cultural preschool program on 45 children of Aboriginal heritage and their caregivers. We used a single-group, pretest (program intake)/posttest (program exit) design with follow-up when the children were 7 years old. We used an observational measure of child receptive language (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III) and caregiver-reported measures of child development (Nipissing District Developmental Screen), risk for child maltreatment (Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory; AAPI), parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index; PSI), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale; RSE), and life skills (Community Life Skills scale; CLS). Using paired t-tests we found statistically significant increases in child receptive language scores between intake and exit, and repeated-measures ANOVA showed that these improvements were maintained up to age 7 years. For caregivers, Pearson's correlations demonstrated that risk for child maltreatment, parenting stress, self-esteem, and life skills were stable over time. Results of this study suggest that children of Aboriginal heritage can benefit from participation in a two-generation, multi-cultural preschool program. Their caregivers may have received greater benefit if issues of intergenerational transmission of the negative influences of residential schools were addressed as part of programming.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article:
Aboriginal - Preschool children, Parents - Intervention studies, Poverty

November 28, 2011

Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

This paper is available online in a current issue of the International Journal of Inclusive Education

Abstract:

The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice‐oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism‐as‐culture movement. Using both these conventional and somewhat unconventional views of disability, a self‐reflective case study was conducted in which the author attempted to facilitate an inclusive pedagogy in a university class, 'Working with Diversity and Difference'. At course conclusion, the author explored teacher candidates' notions of disablement and inclusive practices/strategies. Data sources included five focus group transcripts, 12 weeks of online discussion board postings and eight student assignments, namely inclusive teacher resource files. Data were triangulated and second‐level member checks completed. Some students reported how the pedagogy enabled a reflective practice such that it disrupted their ableistic educational impulses, while others talked more about specific classroom implications to facilitate inclusion. Interestingly, when most students entered into the inclusive conversation beginning from a particular exceptionality, label, or diagnosis (such as intellectual disability), they tended to do so exclusively from an individualised medical model view of disability. Implications for inclusive teacher education pedagogies are discussed.

KEYWORDS/PHRASES assigned to this article: First Nations views of disability, disability studies in education, autism pride/autism‐as‐culture, teacher education, teacher candidates

A Critical Review of Aboriginal Education in Canada: Eurocentric Dominance Impact and Everyday Denial

This paper appears in a current 2011 issue of International Journal of Inclusive Education.

Abstract:

This paper provides a historical review of the education system in Canada and its impact on Indigenous women. By doing so, I hope to address the inequities that surround current educational policies and practices. Also in this paper, I critically investigate the salient aspects of the educational experiences of the women in a contemporary context, with their voices and experiences at the forefront, thereby challenging all of us to envision a formal education system that creates space in which women of Aboriginal ancestry are treated fairly and equitably. (this abstract is from the author)

KEYWORDS assigned to this paper: Aboriginal education, anti-colonial pedagogy, ethnicity, race

Aboriginal Education in Canada: A Postcolonial Analysis

This paper appears in the 2011 issue of AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship (Volume 7, Number 1).

Abstract:

The Australian and Canadian Aboriginal communities are strikingly similar vis-à-vis traditional lifestyles, social structures and histories of victimization during colonization (Morrisette, McKenzie, & Morrisette, 2010). A cultural context, then, means "an emphasis on historical reconstruction based on an understanding of colonialism to alter the stereotypes and false beliefs given to Aboriginal people, and on culture and traditions as restorative to an individual's identity and self-esteem" (Morrisette et al., 2010, p. 98). At present, both communities suffer similar problems of unemployment, alcoholism, drug abuse, sex abuse, mental illness, suicide and racism. In this paper we explore the contribution of Australian Government policies to the lack of progress in Australia. (Abstract from the author)


The following KEYWORDS have been assigned to this journal article: Indigenous peoples, social structure, communities, unemployment, self-esteem

Does the EDI Equivalently Measure Facets of School Readiness for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Children?

This article appeared in the September 2011 issue Social Indicators Research (Volume 103, Number 2).

Abstract:

The aim of the current paper was to examine the equivalence of the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a teacher rating measure of school readiness, forAboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. The current study used an approach, which analyzes the structure and properties of the EDI at the subdomain level. Similar subdomain score distributions would suggest that the EDI measures subdomains similarly for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal groups, whereas systematic variations in distributions would suggest the presence of bias at the subdomain level. The EDI was completed on a population of kindergarteners in 2003 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Results indicate that mean scores for all the domains and subdomains were significantly lower for Aboriginal children. However, the distributions of subdomains in which children were rated as 'challenges exist' were similar among both groups. The findings suggest an equivalent structure of the EDI at the subdomains level for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. The next step is to examine the specific correlates, beyond the structure of the EDI, that are associated with disparities in EDI subdomain scores, such as contextual factors and social conditions.


The following may be useful to you as you continue researching and searching the online databases - here are the KEYWORDS assigned to this article - Aboriginal student achievement, Aboriginal languages and student identity, teacher education, child development, Aboriginal populations, culture, School readiness

'Closing the Gap' at the Peril of Widening the Void: Implications of the Ontario Ministry of Education's Policy for Aboriginal Education

This article appeared in the October 2010 issue of the Canadian Journal of Education (Volume 33, Number 2).

Abstract:

There is a crisis relevant to the publicly funded education of Aboriginal students in Ontario. This article, which presents the details of the crisis, analyzes recent policy statements released by the Ontario Ministry of Education designed to address that crisis. By defining the nature of this critical juncture, presenting how these policies may be "widening the void" rather than "closing the gap," and offering opportunities to respond by improving the capabilities of teachers to enact those policies in their classrooms, the authors appeal to school boards, faculty associations, as well as Deans of Education, to act decisively to support Aboriginal self-determination.


The following may be useful to you as you continue researching and searching the online databases - here are the KEYWORDS assigned to this article: Aboriginal student achievement, Aboriginal languages and student identity, teacher education

Closing the Education Gap: A Case for Aboriginal Early Childhood Education in Canada, A look at the Aboriginal Headstart Program

This article appears in the November 2011 issue of the Canadian Journal of Education (Volume 34, Number 3):

Abstract:

This paper raises awareness concerning the education gap between Aboriginal youth and the non-Aboriginal youth population in Canada. It argues that the historical consequences of colonialism that resulted in diminished sense of self-worth, self-determination, and culture have placed Aboriginals at the low-end of the socio-economic strata. This continuing phenomenon has meant that Aboriginal youth perform far worse than non-Aboriginals in terms of their ability to obtain higher education and employment. Given this, using welfare-state theory and Indigenous-based theory I argue that early-childhood education which is culturally sensitive to the needs of Aboriginal children and controlled by Aboriginal communities will help to remedy and close the education gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth. The paper concludes with solutions to rectify the situation in Canada. Specifically, it discusses the current government initiative, Aboriginal Head Start (AHS), that has been making significant strides throughout the Aboriginal community.

This may be useful to you as you continue researching and searching the online databases - here are the KEYWORDS assigned to this article: Self-determination, culturally appropriate, and Aboriginal control

Attention New PhD Candidates: Statistics Canada's Aboriginal People's Information Page

The Aboriginal peoples of Canada, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, comprise the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada. These distinct groups have unique heritages, languages, cultures. Statistical information is available for the total Aboriginal population and each of the three groups. Information is also available on age, sex, geographical locations, and historical data where available.

Attention New PhD Candidates: Canadian Public Policy Collection

This collection is useful for almost every researcher interested in Canadian policy, but our graduate students here at the Faculty of Education who are interested in researching in the area of Aboriginal Education will find this a rich resource of information and data.


The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

November 24, 2011

Attention New PhD Candidates: More information about the SUMMON SEARCH ENGINE

The Summon search engine is the default on the Western Libraries' homepage. Summon was introduced in the late summer and early fall 2011. Here is more information about the Summon search engine and information for providing feedback about this product.

Attention New PhD Candidates: Social Justice and Peace Studies Program Page

Here is a link to the Social Justice and Peace Studies Program Page. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting these programs.

Attention New PhD Candidates: Women's Studies and Feminist Research Program Guide

Here is a link to the Women's Studies and Feminist Research Program Guide. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting these programs.

Attention New PhD Candidates: First Nations Studies Program Guide

Here is the link to the First Nations Studies Program Guide. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting First Nations Studies at Western.

Attention New PhD Candidates: You will find the PROGRAM GUIDES very useful

The Academic Librarians at Western have created Program Guides for each of the programs supported by Western. These Program Guides are a great place to start your research. The link to the Program Guides resides on the Western Libraries website and on the Education Library web pages.

Attention New PhD Candidates: Here is a list of Academic Librarians at Western

You have a whole team of Academic Librarians supporting you!

Attention New PhD Candidates: We encourage you to set up a RefWorks account

Here is the RefWorks Account SetUp page that also includes amazing help documentation for how to use RefWorks.

November 22, 2011

New Book ~ Developing Writers: Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

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This information is from the publisher's website:

This book takes a fresh look at what it means to learn and develop as a writer in response to concerns on both sides of the Atlantic, and elsewhere in the world, about standards in writing. This book provides the foundation for developing the teaching of writing. It does so by:

Reviewing and comparing models of writing pedagogy from the last fifty years
Discussing the notion of development in depth
Developing a new theory and model for writing in the multimodal and digital age

Its basic premise is that writing needs to be re-conceived as one crucial component of communication among other modes.

Developing Writers is designed for teachers, academics, researchers, curriculum designers, parents and others who are interested in writing development. It will also be intended for anyone who is interested in developing their own writing, and who wishes to understand the principles on which such development is based.

Continue the conversation at www.developingwriters.org

New Book ~ Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work

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This information is from the publisher's website:

In this deeply personal book, the celebrated Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat reflects on art and exile, examining what it means to be an immigrant artist from a country in crisis. Inspired by Albert Camus' lecture, "Create Dangerously," and combining memoir and essay, Danticat tells the stories of artists, including herself, who create despite, or because of, the horrors that drove them from their homelands and that continue to haunt them. Danticat eulogizes an aunt who guarded her family's homestead in the Haitian countryside, a cousin who died of AIDS while living in Miami as an undocumented alien, and a renowned Haitian radio journalist whose political assassination shocked the world. Danticat writes about the Haitian novelists she first read as a girl at the Brooklyn Public Library, a woman mutilated in a machete attack who became a public witness against torture, and the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat and other artists of Haitian descent. Danticat also suggests that the aftermaths of natural disasters in Haiti and the United States reveal that the countries are not as different as many Americans might like to believe.

Create Dangerously is an eloquent and moving expression of Danticat's belief that immigrant artists are obliged to bear witness when their countries of origin are suffering from violence, oppression, poverty, and tragedy.

November 16, 2011

Publishing Opportunities Database

Seeking a home for your research?


The Publishing Opportunities Database provides regularly updated listings of publishing and presentation opportunities for students and professors interested in presenting and publishing their research papers.

The database combines information from three distinct sources, presented in a convenient, intuitive format:

- Journal Calls for Papers - open opportunities for regularly published journals, to which content is constantly being added

- Conference Calls for Papers - time-sensitive content, providing from 3,000 - 4,000 records

- Special Issue Calls for Papers - time sensitive content with from 500 - 800 records available

Searches can be filtered by a variety of options, including conference location, submission date, medium of publication, language of publication, and more.

REMINDER: "Open Up Your Published Research" Workshop

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Electronic Instruction Room, The D. B. Weldon Library (on main campus)


Thanks to the benefits of open access, more and more research funding agencies require funded researchers to make their research findings freely available online so as to maximize knowledge sharing and help advance scholarship. At the same time, academic authors would like to take advantage of open access in order to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their publications. How can researchers and authors go about doing that?

This workshop aims to help attendees learn how to ensure that their published research will be openly available online. It also provides an opportunity for a discussion of issues related to Open Access (OA) publishing.


The Librarian is reading...

...Jonah Lehrer.

November 11, 2011

New Book: Behind Our Doors

Just a reminder that the author of "Behind Our Doors" will be reading at Chapters bookstore (Masonville-Fanshawe Park Rd.) Saturday November 12, 2011 between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. This glowing review of the book just appeared in the Western Gazette campus newspaper.

Asynchronous and Synchronous Online Teaching: Perspectives of Canadian High School Distance Education Teachers

This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of the British Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 42, Number 4).

Abstract:

This paper presents the results of an inductive, interpretive analysis of the perspectives of 42 Canadian high school distance education (DE) teachers on asynchronous and synchronous online teaching. The paper includes a conceptual overview of the affordances and constraints of each form of teaching. Findings provided insight into the following aspects of asynchronous and synchronous online teaching: degree of use; the tools used; the contexts in which each occur; students' preferences; and limitations. Pedagogy emerged as more important than media for both asynchronous and synchronous online teaching. Synchronous online teaching relied on teacher‐ rather than student‐centred approaches. Asynchronous online teaching provided support for self‐paced, highly independent forms of secondary DE supplemented by synchronous online teaching for answering questions and troubleshooting.

Community in Cyberspace: Gender, Social Movement Learning, and the Internet

This journal article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Adult Education Quarterly (Volume 61, Issue 3).

Abstract:

Feminist nonprofit organizations are sites of informal and nonformal learning where citizens learn advocacy, literacy, and the practices of social democracy. With the growing use of information and communication technologies in the nonprofit sector, there are questions as to how well organizations are able to make use of this technology to further their goals of promoting social movement learning and activism. This article reports on a systematic analysis of 100 websites for feminist organizations in Canada. Websites are evaluated for content, currency, and maintenance to determine how well these sites contribute to the work of these organizations. Implications are drawn for learning and teaching in the community-based sphere

Will They Ever Speak with Authority? Race, Post-Coloniality and the Symbolic Violence of Language

This journal article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Educational Philosophy and Theory ~ Special Issue: The Power In/Of Language (Volume 43, Issue 6).

Abstract:

Intersecting authority-language-and-symbolic power, this article tells the story of a group of continental Francophone African youth who find themselves in an urban French-language high school in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Through their narrative, one is confronted by the trauma of one's own language being declared an illegitimate child, hence becoming a 'deceptive fluency' in the 'eyes of power' thanks to race and post-coloniality. They are fully consciousness of this situation and their 'linguistic return', thus gazing back at the eyes of power and declaring themselves 'subjects' capable of love and desire. I briefly address questions of hospitality and language ownership and conclude by addressing the need to re-think the connection between race, power and language.

"Open Up Your Published Research" Workshop

Thanks to the benefits of open access, more and more research funding agencies require funded researchers to make their research findings freely available online so as to maximize knowledge sharing and help advance scholarship. At the same time, academic authors would like to take advantage of open access in order to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their publications. How can researchers and authors go about doing that?

This workshop aims to help attendees learn how to ensure that their published research will be openly available online. It also provides an opportunity for a discussion of issues related to Open Access (OA) publishing.

Workshop Details:

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Location: Electronic Instruction Room, The D. B. Weldon Library (on main campus)

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western is a multi-functional portal that collects, showcases, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by The University of Western Ontario community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing and broaden the international recognition of Western's academic excellence by providing open access to Western's intellectual output and professional achievements.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly updated - have a look!

Information And Communication Technologies And Aboriginal Peoples In Canada: Information Seeking, Community Building, And Access Challenges In Geographically And Socially Marginalized Populations

This article appears in a recent issue of the International Journal of Management and Information Systems (Volume 15, Number 4, Fourth Quarter 2011).

Abstract:

People are coming to rely on Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) to provide them with access to education, healthcare, and government and community services. This paper presents a brief introduction to Aboriginal populations in Canada and the current state of ICT access and adoption among these groups.

Introduction:

Computers and the digital networks that connect them represent a powerful tool to inform, educate, deliver services, entertain, and connect individuals across the globe. In Canada, policy-makers, business leaders, researchers, educators, and individuals have all come to recognize the often-times high cost of ICT as an investment in human capital development and future competitiveness.

A number of economic, technical, and social factors, however, influence how ICTs can be effectively employed to suit the needs, resources, and capacities of different population groups. The most common factors creating a barrier to ICT adoption in Canada include the cost for hardware and software, availability of effective and reliable communication connections, especially in rural areas, and the absence of required skills and computerrelated training (Statistics Canada, 2000). Cross-cultural research has also examined how differences in cultural beliefs or orientations can impact the way individuals perceive various characteristics of ICTs and how these perceptions influence intentions and abilities to adopt and adapt such technologies (e.g., Kimery & Amirkhalkhali, 2007; Van Slyke, C, Belanger, F., & Sridhar, V. (2005); Straub, Keil, & Brenner, 1997). Most of the existing crosscultural research on ICT adoption and use has focused on differences between populations from distinct national cultures (for example, between China and Canada). Very little published research has focused on the special circumstances experienced by marginalized population groups, such as Aboriginal peoples in Canada, living as part of, yet spatial or culturally separate from, a larger, dominant national culture.

Omission by Design: The Need for an Overhaul of the Ontario Social Studies and History Curriculum

This journal article appeared in a recent 2011 issue of the International Journal of Business & Social Science (Volume 2, Number 14).

Abstract:

The intention of Ontario's Social Studies and History curriculum is to promote a better understanding of Canada's past. Ideally, students are encouraged to reflect upon, synthesize and critically examine periods in its development as a nation that are often problematic. The prescribed, provincially approved curriculum fails to meet this expectation by omitting the Residential School experience thousands of Aboriginal children were forced to endure. The social, cultural, physical and sexual abuse inflicted upon a generation of Native children is omitted entirely from the text teachers are instructed to share with Ontario's students. The author argues that Junior, Intermediate and Senior students are developmentally prepared to both receive and grapple with this dark era of Canadian history. Omitting the Residential School experience from Ontario's Social Studies and History curriculum prevents students from understanding this atrocity and what measures must be undertaken in order for such an occurrence to not be replicated within Canada and abroad.

Getting Started: How Do I Borrow Materials If I Visit Another Canadian University Library?

FAQ: Can I borrow library materials from another Canadian university library?

ANSWER: Yes. Western Libraries participates in the Canadian University Reciprocal Borrowing Agreement (CURBA), a resource sharing program with other Canadian university libraries. This agreement allows UWO students, faculty and staff to borrow in person from university libraries across Canada. Read MORE about this service.


This service is especially useful for students taking courses online.

Getting Started: RefWorks Tutorial

Here is a RefWorks tutorial that takes you through the basics of the software.

Sites We Like ~ EDUCAUSE

EDUCAUSE® is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology. EDUCAUSE helps those who lead, manage, and use information resources to shape strategic decisions at every level.

Sites We Like ~ First Monday

First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to the Internet.

Getting Started: Searching the Library Catalogue

Looking for a book by a specific author?
Looking for a specific book title?
Looking for resources on a specific topic?
Looking for a specific journal title?
Looking for any books on a particular topic?

If you nodded "yes" to any of these questions, you want to begin your research by becoming familiar with our Library Catalogue.

We highly recommend that you click the CATALOGUE option at the top of the Western Libraries' website.

You can search the CATALOGUE by book title, journal title, author and keyword, and there are amazing "limiting" features that help you focus your search strategy also.

Research Support ~ Canadian Public Policy Collection

The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

Getting Started: Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find journal articles for your literature reviews for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests. The field of education is multi-disciplinary and it is often necessary for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list.

University Faculty Style of Dress and Students' Perception of Instructor Credibility

This journal article appeared in a 2011 issue of International Journal of Business & Social Science (Volume 2, Issue 15).

Abstract:

What someone is wearing often forms the first impression about the character of the person. This study focused on what university professors wear and the perceptions of students in terms of credibility, character, and likeability. Two hundred and fifty-seven participants completed a survey responding to questions relating to a photograph of a male or female university professor, with faces obscured, and dressed in casual, semi-casual, or formal attire. University professors in formal attire are perceived as more credible than less formally dressed faculty. Contrary to the hypothesis, female formally dressed professors were not perceived as less credible or competent than their male counterparts. Males in formal attire are less likeable than females in formal dress as well as males and females in casual styles of dress. These findings will assist faculty in determining the level of credibility or likeability they want to project in the classroom.

Teacher Leaders and Colleagues Assessing Conflict Resolution Skills: A Comparison of Perceptions

This journal article appeared in a 2011 issue of International Journal of Business & Social Science (Volume 2, Issue 15).

Abstract:

The focus of this study is on teacher leader perceptions concerning conflict resolution skills. Teachers included within the study (N=70) examined their skills for resolving conflict at the workplace, which included teachers employed at public and private preschools, elementary, middle/junior high, and high schools. A conflict resolution survey was administered to the teachers, who were enrolled in a teacher leader masters degree program. Colleagues of those teachers completed conflict resolution surveys for comparison purposes. Results were analyzed to check alignment of perceptions. Analysis of the surveys indicated no statistically significant differences in teacher self-perceptions and teacher colleagues' perceptions of conflict resolution skills. Thus, self-perception of teacher leaders and perceptions of their colleagues reveal consistent findings. Study participants used the results of the analysis to work on improving weak areas in conflict resolution

Recent Evolution of Immigrant-Language Transmission in Canada

This journal article appeared in the Summer 2011 issue of Canadian Social Trends (Issue 92).

Abstract:

The article explores the evolution of immigrant-language transmission in Canada from the late 20th century to the early 21st century. According to the author, intergenerational immigrant-language transmission has increased in intensity since the 1980s. It is suggested that regular migratory flows from certain areas and communications technologies are factors in this increase. The effect of the Canadian Multicultural Act on language transmission is also discussed.

Getting Started: Off-Campus Access

Do you need to use library resources from off-campus? Just sign in to the Off Campus Access with your Western computer account unsername and password (this is the same username and password you use for your UWO email account) and you can access the Western Libraries' amazing online collection and research resources from any location.

November 8, 2011

New Book ~ Viewfinding: Perspectives on New Media Curriculum in the Arts

This information is from the publisher's website:

This is a collection of essays on the arts, new media, popular culture, and technologies as they influence practices of curriculum development and teaching. The authors - artists, educators, scholars, and researchers with both scholarly and practical expertise - share their teaching practices and curriculum knowledge, and reflect upon challenging issues in contemporary art, popular culture, new media, and technology. Each chapter proposes pedagogical structures and curriculum resources that can be adapted to diverse school contexts and technical resources. The perspectives gathered in this book reflect ideas drawn from several disciplines, including contemporary art, histories of the arts, culture and technology, cultural studies, and media studies, as well as various approaches to the study of technologies; authors also incorporate a range of educational theories and instructional practices, mainly from the visual and performing arts. At times explicit and at others implicit, these wide-ranging conceptual influences inform the varied curriculum and teaching practices described here. Together, these essays and their companion DVD, which illustrates many of these diverse perspectives, provide a comprehensive and thoughtful look at arts-based approaches to new media.

New Book ~ Creating Meaning through Literature and the Arts: An Integration Handbook for Teachers (Fourth Edition)

This information is from the publisher's website:

The new edition of this best-selling text on arts-based teaching redefines literacy in light of the 21st century need for multiple literacies. Creating Meaning through Literature and the Arts: An Integration Handbook for Teachers, 4th Edition provides teachers with an Arts Integration Blueprint, comprised of 10 building blocks for arts-based instruction that includes collaborative unit planning, best arts-based teaching practices, and assessment for learning. The Five Seed Strategy chapters provide a compendium of activities to jumpstart the use of literature, art, music, drama, and dance as integral teaching tools for science, social studies, math, and literacy instruction.

New Book ~ How to Assess Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Your Classroom

This information is from the publisher's website:


Educators know it's important to get students to engage in "higher-order thinking." But what does higher-order thinking actually look like? And how can K-12 classroom teachers assess it across the disciplines? Author, consultant, and former classroom teacher Susan M. Brookhart answers these questions and more in this straightforward, practical guide to assessment that can help teachers determine if students are actually displaying the kind of complex thinking that current content standards emphasize.Brookhart begins by laying out principles for assessment in general and for assessment of higher-order thinking in particular. She then defines and describes aspects of higher-order thinking according to the categories established in leading taxonomies, giving specific guidance on how to assess students in the following areas:* Analysis, evaluation, and creation* Logic and reasoning* Judgment* Problem solving* Creativity and creative thinkingExamples drawn from the National Assessment of Educational Progress and from actual classroom teachers include multiple-choice items, constructed-response (essay) items, and performance assessment tasks. Readers will learn how to use formative assessment to improve student work and then use summative assessment for grading or scoring. Aimed at elementary, middle, and high school teachers in all subject areas, How to Assess Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Your Classroom provides essential background, sound advice, and thoughtful insight into an area of increasing importance for the success of students in the classroom--and in life.

New Book ~ Natural Learning for a Connected World: Education, Technology, and the Human Brain

Why do video games fascinate kids so much that they will spend hours pursuing a difficult skill? Why don't they apply this kind of intensity to their schoolwork? This book describes an approach for integrating technology into teaching that will help all students (all grade levels and all cultural and ethnic groups) learn with greater depth and ease.

New Book ~ Teaching Students Thinking Skills and Strategies: A Framework for Cognitive Education in Inclusive Settings

This information is from the publisher's website:

Developing the ability to think is a major part of education, which helps students become independent learners and participate fully in a learning environment.

This book sets out the theory and outlines a model for implementing the teaching of thinking at whole-school, group and individual levels in inclusive settings. The model uses a three-tier approach to ensure that all learners are included: teaching thinking for all, which takes into account common needs; working with small groups, for those with exceptional needs such as learning difficulties or high ability; and addressing individualised learning needs, including those with a complex disability. The book covers key approaches to the teaching of thinking, giving examples of how each can best be used at each tier level. It also addresses the impact of different social contexts, cultures and environmental surroundings on learning.

This book will be essential reading for all members of school communities, including education leaders and teachers. Educational psychologists, special educational needs co-ordinators, speech and language therapists, and those with particular interest in educating children who are vulnerable, from disadvantaged backgrounds, and from culturally different backgrounds, will find much of value in this book.

New Book ~ Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator

This information is from the publisher's website:

This book, a resource for educators, uses the theme of media literacy as a lens through which to view and discuss social networking and Web 2.0 environments. There is ongoing and positive research on the participatory culture created by youth who are heavily involved in the new digital technologies, yet schools tend to avoid these mediums for fear of the unknown. Can students learn within this context? This book posits that indeed they can, using media literacy as a way to provide a framework for these mediated environments. The book serves as a forum for educators and those interested in the field of media literacy, digital, and social technologies, who seek to bridge curriculum connections as well as understand the online culture of students.

November 4, 2011

Getting Started: Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals


The field of education is multi-disciplinary and it is often necessary for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list.

Mark Your Calendars: "Open Up Your Published Research" ~ Open Access (OA) Workshop

Thanks to the benefits of open access, more and more research funding agencies require funded researchers to make their research findings freely available online so as to maximize knowledge sharing and help advance scholarship. At the same time, academic authors would like to take advantage of open access in order to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their publications. How can researchers and authors go about doing that?

This workshop aims to help attendees learn how to ensure that their published research will be openly available online. It also provides an opportunity for a discussion of issues related to open access publishing.

Workshop Details:

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Electronic Instruction Room, The D. B. Weldon Library (on main campus)

"Wiki-ed poetry": Transforming Preservice Teachers' Preconceptions about Poetry and Poetry Teaching

This article appeared in the September 2011 issue of the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy (Volume 55, Number 1). The authors are Janette Hughes and Sue Dymoke.

Summary:

As instructors who prepare aspiring teachers to teach English, we find that our students are often intimidated by the idea of teaching poetry. We also find that it is the most common genre that they are asked to teach in their field placements in the schools. We undertook this project, which brings together beginning teachers in Canada and England on a wiki, to explore some of the tensions they felt about teaching poetry.

Existing literature supports the view that many teachers shy away fi'om teaching poetry tbr a variety of reasons (Benton, 1999, 2000; Lockward, 1994; Nichols, 2002; Pike, 2000). In a summary of his 1999 survey of 100 high school teachers in the United Kingdom, Benton reported that many teachers felt a "sense of inadequacy about their own knowledge and teaching skills where poetry was concerned" (p. 521). Disappointingly, he also notes that "some children rarely encountered poetry of any kind" (p. 521).

A survey of approximately 56 candidates in two preservice English methods classes, one in The Midlands, England, and one in Ontario, Canada, yields similar results. Some cannot remember any kind of poetry study in elementary or high school, and others share stories of negative experiences with poetry, in particular memories of having to "dissect" poetry line by line. Only a handful of these candidates share positive, formative experiences with poetry in the classroom. It is not surprising then that many of them report feeling nervous or anxious about the prospect of teaching poetry.

In undertaking this qualitative research, one of our goals was to try to better understand and potentially help to alleviate the discomfort teachers might feel about teaching poetry by challenging some of the common assumptions surrounding poetry. Our research is informed by theories within the paradigm of recent literacy studies including the work of Lankshear and Knobel (2003), Knobel and Lankshear (2007), and Gee (2004). This is concerned with literacy practices that develop in different social contexts and values pertaining to these practices and contexts.

In the wiki-ed poetry project we particularly wanted to investigate how digital poetry texts can be made, the spaces that their makers occupy, and the affordances that digital communication can provide for construction, reflection, collaboration, and display of the self simultaneously as both writer and reader. It is an aspect of the constructed self, namely the emerging preservice poetry teacher and his or her preconceptions of poetry that is our focus in this article.

Drawing on existing literature on the nature of poetry and the challenges of poetry teaching, we explore its claims with respect to our teacher candidates. We examine how their thinking about poetry and poetry pedagogy evolves during their training year through analysis of data captured during their participation in a poetry wiki, together with their responses to pre- and postcourse surveys and semistructured interviews.

People We Know: Hon. Laurel Broten, Minister of Education

This information is from the Ontario Ministry of Education's website:

Laurel Broten was first elected to the Ontario legislature in 2003 and was re-elected in 2007 and 2011. She was appointed Minister of Education in October 2011, and she continues to serve as Minister Responsible for Women's Issues.

Broten has served as Minister of Children and Youth Services, Minister of the Environment, Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Energy and Infrastructure, the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care and to the Premier. She also had responsibility for Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy.

A tireless advocate for women and children, Broten conducted province-wide consultations that led to the government's Domestic Violence Action Plan and introduced legislation that requires all Ontarians to report images of child abuse. This bill became law under the Child Pornography Reporting Act.

Broten again took bold and progressive steps when she authored a report detailing a five-point action plan to create more opportunities and reduce barriers for internationally trained doctors in Ontario. Her report formed the basis for legislation introduced in 2008 that helps to improve access to health care for Ontario families.

As Minister of the Environment, Broten developed policies under one of Canada's most comprehensive climate change plans that supports business, creates jobs and sets aggressive targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. She also introduced the Clean Water Act designed to better safeguard Ontario's drinking water, ban diversions from the Great Lakes and, for the first time, charge commercial and industrial users for the water they take and use.

Broten's work in the area of corporate social responsibility and better protection of investors led to a review of Ontario's reporting standards after receiving unanimous support by the legislature.

Broten has always been an active member of her community. Prior to running for office, she built a successful career practicing equity, commercial and human rights law. She earned her law degree from the University of Western Ontario with distinction, and articled at the Supreme Court of Canada for one of Canada's most preeminent jurists.

Broten, who is fluently bilingual, lives in Etobicoke with her husband Paul, twin sons Zachary and Ryan, and their dog, Howard.

November 3, 2011

Pre-service Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding School-Based Bullying

This article appears in a current 2011 issue of Canadian Journal of Education (Volume 34, Number 2).

Abstract:

Pre-service teachers responded to two questionnaires exploring perceptions of school violence. Responses to the "Teachers' Attitudes about Bullying" and "Trainee Teachers' Bullying Attitudes" questionnaires suggest that teachers across all academic divisions view bullying as a serious concern with implications for their role within the profession. There were considerable differences regarding what was defined as bullying, with variability related to the potential of intervening to end the violence. Covert forms of bullying including relational, homophobic, and cyber were viewed as less serious than overt violence and therefore less worthy of attention. The research findings point to the importance of providing pre-service teachers with training regarding anti-violence strategies.

Why Teaching? Motivations Influencing Beginning Teachers' Choice of Profession and Teaching Practice

This article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Research in Higher Education Journal (Volume 13).

Abstract:

This paper explores why beginning teachers in Saskatchewan chose to enter the profession and the importance of these motivations in their first year as teachers. More specifically, using survey and interview methodologies, the purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate the entry motivations of Saskatchewan beginning teachers; (2) determine if the entry motivations changed over time; and (3) to examine whether there were any differences in motivations due to demographic characteristics. Survey results of 279 beginning teachers suggested that the entry and teacher practice motivation items most frequently identified by the participants as important included "making a difference in people's lives", "working with children or youth", and the "opportunity to teach subjects that were of interest". Motivations did change over time and across demographic characteristics. The importance of "having my own classroom", "salary and benefits", and "professional quality of life" increased from entry motivation to first year teaching motivation. Entry and teacher motivations differed significantly by gender, age group, and program of study. Teacher motivations also differed by marital status. Thematic analysis of 12 interviews resulted in four themes. With the exception of "wanting to be a teacher", interview participants tended to highlight external motivating factors such as "teaching as an alternative option", the influence of "significant others as role model teachers", and teaching as a "good match for skills and interests". The implications of the quantitative and qualitative findings and the relationship of these findings to the extant literature are described further in the discussion.

"They Didn't Have Out There Gay Parents--They Just Looked Like Normal Regular Parents": Investigating Teachers' Approaches to Addressing Same‐Sex Parenting and Non‐normative Sexuality in the Elementary School Classroom

This journal article, co-authored by Wayne Martino and Wendy Cumming-Potvin appeared in the September 2011 issue of Curriculum Inquiry (Volume 41, Number 4).

Abstract:

In this article we draw on queer theoretical and critical literacy perspectives to investigate elementary school teachers' pedagogical approaches to addressing same‐ sex parenting and non‐normative sexuality in the elementary classroom. Through undertaking case study research, we examine two Australian elementary school teachers' reflections on using literacy resources in their classrooms which include representations of same‐sex families/relationships. Our overall aim in reporting on this study is to provide further insight into the pedagogical potential for interrupting heteronormativity in the elementary school classroom and within the broader context of English education. Implications of the research for pre‐service teacher education and for the professional learning of teachers more generally are outlined.

Getting Started: The Basics of APA Tutorial

The rules of APA Style, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On the APA Style help pages you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

We recommend you spend some time with The Basics of APA Tutorial. This tutorial is designed for those who have no previous knowledge of APA Style. It shows users how to structure and format their work, recommends ways to reduce bias in language, identifies how to avoid charges of plagiarism, shows how to cite references in text, and provides selected reference examples.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly updated - have a look!

"Education is in the streets"

Also published in INSIDE HIGHER ED, this is an older (August 31, 2011) piece by Scott McLemee:

When students took to the streets in Rome last November to demonstrate against proposed budget cuts to the university system, they introduced something new to the vocabulary of protest. To defend themselves from police truncheons they carried improvised shields made of polystyrene, painted, on the front, with the names of classic works of literature and philosophy: Moby Dick, The Republic, Don Quixote, A Thousand Plateaus.... The practice caught on. A couple of weeks later, another "Book Bloc" appeared in London as students and public-sector workers demonstrated against rising tuition.

The Librarian is reading...

The Occupy Wall Street Library Blog. "The People's Library is the collective, public, open library of the Occupy Wall Street leaderless resistance movement. Located in the northeast corner of Liberty Plaza, the library provides free, open and unrestricted access to our collection of books, magazines, newspapers, 'zines, pamphlets and other materials that have been donated, collected, gathered and discovered during the occupation."

"Guerrilla Librarians in Our Midst"

Smile! This is from the INSIDE HIGHER ED website (posted on Wednesday November 2, 2011). It is written by Scott McLemee:

When thinking about the future of Occupy Wall Street, there is something to say for meteorological determinism. An open-ended protest movement may grow when the weather permits, but an Arctic blast means shrinkage. OWS may bloom again in the spring, perhaps on a scale to dwarf anything that's happened so far. But when you ask people involved in the movement about what to expect in the meantime, the response can be rather evasive, and it sometimes comes with a look that says, "Have you ever tried to do anything by consensus, let alone long-term planning? Seriously, quit asking me that."

But one segment of the movement has been thinking about the cold months ahead, and even beyond that. They are the "guerrilla librarians" -- the people organizing and distributing books and periodicals to keep the demonstrators informed and entertained. A library was established in Zuccotti Park at the very start of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations, and it has received a good deal of attention. Several more sprang up as the protests spread. With the occupation movement, decentralized improvisation is the name of the game, so it's impossible to tell just how many libraries have sprung up. But they exist in Boston and Philadelphia, in Portland, Ore. and Halifax, Nova Scotia, among other places. They are staffed by a mixture of professional librarians and activist volunteers, with "stacks" created through donations from publishers, bookstores, and individuals.


You really have to read this entire article so click HERE!

November 2, 2011

Themed Journal Issue ~ The Science Teacher

The theme of the October 2011 issue of The Science Teacher (Volume 78, Number 7) is 21st Century Tools.

The Teacher's Laptop as a Hub for Learning in the Classroom

This article appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of the Journal of Research on Technology in Education (Volume 44, Number 1).

Abstract:

This article presents data from a longitudinal study of the effects of providing teachers with personal laptop computers. It considers the role of teacher laptops in learning and teaching in three schools selected because technology was widely used there. Using multiple methods of data collection (observation in classrooms; interviews with teachers, leaders, and students; and document- come-file analysis), the authors investigated the conditions surrounding the infusion of the laptop into all aspects of teacher practice, including, critically, practice in the classroom. The examination of classroom practice illustrated how one computer came to act as a hub for a variety of other digital technology use.

"Save Library and Archives Canada"

From a CAUT news release:

The Canadian Association of University Teachers today unveiled a national campaign to protect Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

The "Save Library and Archives Canada" is being launched by CAUT in response to funding cuts and internal managerial decisions that are threatening the quality and integrity of Canada's only national public library and archives.

"Badly conceived restructuring, a narrowing of its mandate, and financial cutbacks are undermining LAC's ability to acquire, preserve and make publicly available Canada's full documentary heritage," James L. Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers said at a news conference in Ottawa today.

These changes, Turk added, have already led to a reduction in the number of specialist archivists and librarians, reduced public access and services, and the loss of rare and important materials.

Liam McGahern, president of the Antiquarian Booksellers of Canada, said a growing number of Canadian materials are not being collected by LAC because of reduced funding and a change in its acquisitions policy.

"Canadians recently lost a unique and irreplaceable set of journals chronicling late 19th Century stories of settlers and First Nations people of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Labrador Coast. This is just one of many examples," McGahern explained. "Rare military documents, sheet music, and literature that would otherwise have gone to Library and Archives Canada are quietly all slipping away."

CAUT is calling on the federal government to amend the LAC Act to ensure its mandate includes developing a comprehensive, not selective, collection of Canadian material.

"Our nation's artistic, historical, and cultural heritage is at stake," said Turk. "Genealogists, historians, researchers, graduate students, Aboriginal communities, and the general public are all affected by what is happening at LAC."

The Canadian Association of University Teachers is the national voice of 66,000 academic and general staff at 120 universities and colleges across the country.

More information on the campaign can be found at www.savelibraryarchivescanada.ca.

And, I Quote...

Redefining the "R" in "VR"

As we become more and more comfortable mediating all kinds of situations online and through various technologies, our virtual selves increasingly overlap our "real" lives. There's so much "virtual" in our days that it has become, for many of us, synchronous with the other, more analog aspects of our work, play and even friendships. Posting a "happy birthday!" message on Facebook is as automatic as dropping a card in the mail. E-mailing relevant links to co-workers happens as naturally as mentioning an interesting article over lunch.

Which points toward why the "R" in "Virtual Reference" needs to change if libraries are going
to succeed in promoting reference through chat sessions, phone calls, e-mails, texts, mobile
applications and other as-of-yet unimagined technologies.

If we want people to accept and promote the library's role in their online information lives, we
need to make the "R" also stand for "Relationships."

From the Introduction: Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, and Marie L. Radford. 2011. Seeking Synchronicity: Revelations and Recommendations for Virtual Reference. Dublin, OH: OCLC Research.

Symposium ~ ACADEMIC LIBRARIANSHIP - A CRISIS OR AN OPPORTUNITY?

In response to recent developments in academic libraries in Ontario and elsewhere, academic librarians are invited to gather to discuss the challenges facing the profession of academic librarianship today.

This one-day Symposium, at the University of Toronto, will serve as an opportunity to hear stakeholders' views of the profession as well as an opportunity for academic librarians to explore ways of re-affirming the legitimacy and the integrity of academic librarianship both now and as we move forward in the future.

The Symposium will be organized around three main themes: library education and curriculum, the role of professional associations and the value of professional accreditation, and labour issues.


The Symposium will be held on Friday November 18th, 2011 in Toronto.

Western Libraries Strategic Plan ~ "Vision: Integration as Key Partners in the Academic Enterprise"

"Western Libraries supports the University's strategic priorities - enhancing the student experience and the quality of undergraduate and graduate programs, expanding graduate enrollment, increasing research intensity and cross-disciplinary research initiatives, and taking a leadership role internationally in order to have a global impact - by providing value-added library and archival services that are relevant to a 21st century university. Western Libraries will implement strategies to achieve integration as a key partner in the academic enterprise, thereby providing appropriate and effective services to support the University's teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and administrative goals. To achieve this integration Western Libraries will focus on strategic advocacy, strengthen physical and virtual infrastructure, expand collections, and develop staff. At a more fundamental level, it will define what it means to be an academic library and deliver relevant academic library and archives services in the 21st century. Western Libraries will then take the steps necessary to achieve the required transformation to become that 21st century academic library." Read the entire Strategic Plan.

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually. You can easily locate DOAJ by clicking on the DATABASES link (there is an alphabetical list of all of the databases available to you) on the Western Libraries' website.

Open Access Workshop ~ Thursday November 17th at The D. B. Weldon Library

Thanks to the benefits of open access, more and more research funding agencies require funded researchers to make their research findings freely available online so as to maximize knowledge sharing and help advance scholarship. At the same time, academic authors would like to take advantage of open access in order to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their publications. How can researchers and authors go about doing that?

This workshop aims to help attendees learn how to ensure that their published research will be openly available online. It also provides an opportunity for a discussion of issues related to open access publishing.

Workshop Details:

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Electronic Instruction Room, The D. B. Weldon Library (on main campus)

The Right to Research Coalition

The Right to Research Coalition was founded by students in the summer of 2009 to promote an open scholarly publishing system based on the belief that no student should be denied access to the articles they need because their institution cannot afford the often high cost of access. Since its launch, the Coalition has grown to represent nearly 7 million students internationally and counts among its members the largest student organizations in both the United States and Canada. While the Coalition currently has a strong base in North America, it is by no means solely a North American organization and is expanding to incorporate student organizations from around the world.

"Optimize Your Publishing, Maximize Your Impact" ~ Guide from the Right to Research Coalition

The Right to Research Coalition has released a new guide that provides (graduate) students with advice on how to choose a journal for publishing. The guide is available HERE.

TODAY: Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) to launch national campaign to Save Library and Archives Canada

On Wednesday, November 2, the Canadian Association of University Teachers will launch its national campaign: "Save Library and Archives Canada".

The campaign will expose how major restructuring of Library and Archives Canada is undermining the institution responsible for preserving Canada's history and heritage. "Library and Archives Canada is cutting services and acquisitions. Unless this is reversed, the damage to our country will be enormous," said CAUT's executive director James L. Turk.

People We Know: Emerging Technology Librarians (ETL) ~ I made the list!

HLWIKI Canada, originating from the UBC, has been following and tracking trends in academic librarianship including Emerging Technology Librarians (ETLs) and has created a list of Emerging Technology Librarians in Canada and I made the list! I am so pleased and so honoured.

An emerging technologies librarian (ETL) is a position that has become increasingly necessary in libraries of all kinds because of social media, although it is a more common job title in the United States than Canada. A number of difficulties arise with the ETL title: the position itself still, being so new, lacks a concrete definition and continues to be refined and developed as it becomes more widely applied. At a recent ALA conference, LITA devoted an entire session to the issue of emerging technologies in libraries and attempted to define an ETL as a professional librarian whose "main role is to explore, evaluate, promote, and implement various emerging technologies".

From a cursory evaluation of various position descriptions for ETLs, the following skills were mentioned as required:

- as part of reference/instruction teams, ETLs provide technological know-how in public service environments
- enthusiastic about technologies and exploring emerging technologies for use in library settings
- explore, develop, promote, and assess innovative online tools including social networking and other services for library learners
- create and implement online learning modules to support information literacy, reference and web-based library programs
- knowledge of instructional design principles and the ability to teach in online and face-to-face environments
- delivery innovative and adventurous services as technologies are evaluated and new ways are found to apply them
- familiar with the range of social tools, such as IM, social networking, blogs, wikis, eLearning software, and open content
- advanced skills in technologies, and web development skills such as PHP, Javascript, XML, and SQL
- leadership skills in libraries regarding innovative, technology-based services
- creating, promoting, and facilitating use of electronic resources and services
- work effectively in a collaborative environment, take initiative, self-directed, and committed to innovation and creativity
- an ability to talk about emerging technologies with others at all skill levels

ETLs are increasingly important as libraries struggle to stay current with and make sense of the sheer number of emerging technologies. There is a dire need for tech-savvy librarians who can identify, evaluate, and implement new technologies that can benefit librarians and users alike.

The Librarian is reading...

Teaching Literacy for LOVE and WISDOM: Being the BOOK and Being the CHANGE by Jeffrey D. Wilhelm and Bruce Novak.

October 31, 2011

And, I Quote...

"Don't try to innovate for the future. Innovate for the present." ~ Peter Drucker

Sites We Like ~ The 21st Century Teacher

We like all of the features of this social network for educators called The 21st Century Teacher. But, their Cool Websites section is particularly fun and it looks like they are adding to it regularly.

Themed Journal Issue ~ Teaching Children Mathematics

The focus of the October 2011 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics (Volume 18, Number 3) is "The Value of "Why?"

Themed Journal Issue ~ Science Scope

The focus of the October 2011 issue of Science Scope (Volume 35, Number 2) is Science & Art.

October 28, 2011

New Book ~ Small Schools, Education, and The Importance of Community: Pathways to Improvement and a Sustainable Future

This information is from the publisher's website:

Small Schools, Education, and the Importance of Community focuses on three successful approaches for using the school as a catalyst for community development and revitalization, particularly in rural areas. The strategies also work well in suburban and urban areas. The three approaches described include: leadership by K-12 teachers, administrators, and school boards, particularly in the areas of developing schools as community centers, community as curriculum, and school-based economic development. Succesful case studies are also included.


International Reading Association (IRA): New Literacies and 21st-Century Technologies

To become fully literate in today's world, students must become proficient in the new literacies of 21st-century technologies. IRA believes that literacy educators have a responsibility to integrate information and communication technologies (ICTs) into the curriculum, to prepare students for the futures they deserve.

Since 1956, IRA has been a nonprofit, global network of individuals and institutions committed to worldwide literacy. More than 70,000 members strong, the Association supports literacy professionals through a wide range of resources, advocacy efforts, volunteerism, and professional development activities.

iPed: Pedagogy for Digital Text Production

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of The Reading Teacher (Volume 65, Issue Number 1).

Abstract:

Reading and writing are being transformed by global changes in communication practices using new media technologies. iPed is a research-based pedagogy that enables teachers to navigate innoative digital text production in the literacy classroom.

Western Libraries Receives an A- in Globe and Mail University Survey

Once again, Western Libraries has received top marks from students responding to the University Report survey produced by The Globe and Mail.

Western Libraries received an overall grade of A- in a four way tie for first place in the category of large universities. Concordia, McGill and University of Toronto (St. George) also received an A-.

Since 2005 Western students have rated Western Libraries as one of the top university libraries in Canada, placing it first among large universities. For full details from this year's survey please CLICK HERE.

Staff of Western Libraries work hard to provide the facilities, collections and services required by our students to be successful in their studies. It is gratifying to see, through survey results such as this one, that our users notice and appreciate our efforts.

Education Library on Facebook

Themed Journal Issue ~ College Composition and Communication

"Indigenous and Ethnic Rhetorics" is the theme of the September 2011 issue of College Composition and Communication (Volume 63, Number 1).

Themed Journal Issue ~ Australian Journal of Education

Small Schools/Rural Schools is the theme of the August 2011 issue of the Australian Journal of Education (Volume 55, Number 1).

Themed Journal Issue ~ TESOL Quarterly

The theme of the September 2011 issue of TESOL Quarterly (Volume 45, Number 3) is Narrative Research in TESOL.

Celebratory Pause

Dear Readers: This is the 3,000 post to the Education Library Blog! Thank you for your many kind words of encouragement and continued support over the years.

New Book ~ Structure and Improvisation in Creative Teaching

This summary is from the publisher's website:

With an increasing emphasis on creativity and innovation in the twenty-first century, teachers need to be creative professionals just as students must learn to be creative. And yet, schools are institutions with many important structures and guidelines that teachers must follow. Effective creative teaching strikes a delicate balance between structure and improvisation. The authors draw on studies of jazz, theater improvisation and dance improvisation to demonstrate that the most creative performers work within similar structures and guidelines. By looking to these creative genres, the book provides practical advice for teachers who wish to become more creative professionals.

My Favourite Catalogue Feature: "My Reading History"

Keep track of the library books you have signed out. My Reading History is an service you choose to activate. Once this feature is activated you can retain a list of titles of all the materials you sign out. The list provides access to bibliographic information for these items. Your reading history list of titles is kept until you choose to edit or delete. Maintaining and editing the list of titles is at your discretion and completely confidential. My Reading History can be turned off at any time, and turned back on again when you choose.

Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (CRTLHE)

The Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (CRTLHE) promotes an evidence-based approach to teaching and learning in post-secondary education. Under the leadership of Debra Dawson, the current director of the Teaching Support Centre, the Centre consists of staff and faculty members from a variety of disciplinary perspectives who engage in research designed to advance the understanding and, ultimately, the practice of teaching and learning in higher education. The research focus on teaching and learning is broadly defined including both curricular and co-curricular endeavours. This expansive lens allows a comprehensive understanding of teaching and learning within the post-secondary context. Current research includes several Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) funded research projects on the impact of a variety of teaching programs involving faculty and graduate students on enhancing teaching and learning. The centre is a collaborative partnership with the Faculty of Education.

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western collects, disseminates, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by The University of Western Ontario community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing by providing open access to the academic and professional achievements at Western.

Digital & Scholarly Blog: Research and Scholarship in the Digital Age

The Digital & Scholarly Blog was created for outreach to The University of Western Ontario (UWO) community and to colleagues in higher education. It alerts readers to the latest news about and resources for Open Access (OA), scholarly publishing and other relevant topics such as author rights, peer review, and publication impact.

October 27, 2011

New Book: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Reconsidered: Institutional Integration and Impact

This information is from the publisher's website:

Drawing on the experience with the individuals, campuses, and professional associations associated with the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and the Institutional Leadership Program, this important resource examines four critical areas where engagement with the scholarship of teaching and learning can have a significant effect. This book is intended for a broad audience of campus leaders, faculty, and people in foundations and other education associations with an interest in supporting new directions in teaching and learning.

Texting, Tweeting and Teaching: School Boards Manage Technology in the Classroom

How do school boards manage the kinds of technologies used in the classroom? Author Sylvia Link asks board representatives to explain the most current practices. Read all about it in the Fall 2011 issue of Education Today (Volume 23, Number 3).

Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs

The discussion of homework is always a hot topic in the field of education. This book provides an overview of the issues and debate. It has an excellent reference list if you are interested in other resources on this timely topic. Click HERE for a link to a short list of books available in Western Libraries.

Boards Do Their Homework on Homework Policies

This journal article appears in the Fall 2011 issue of Education Today (Volume 23, Number 3)

Education Library on Facebook

Western Libraries Receives an A- in Globe and Mail Survey

Once again, Western Libraries has received top marks from students responding to the University Report survey produced by The Globe and Mail. Western Libraries received an overall grade of A- in a four way tie for first place in the category of large universities. Concordia, McGill and University of Toronto (St. George) also received an A-. Since 2005 Western students have rated Western Libraries as one of the top university libraries in Canada, placing it first among large universities. For full details from this year's survey please CLICK HERE.

Staff of Western Libraries work hard to provide the facilities, collections and services required by our students to be successful in their studies. It is gratifying to see, through survey results such as this one, that our users notice and appreciate our efforts.

The Librarian is reading...

Binky Under Pressure by Ashley Spires.

Summary:

In Binky's third adventure, our intrepid, sometimes accident-prone hero is shaken out of his routine when he's forced to contend with Gracie, a dainty striped foster kitty who comes to live at Binky's space station (aka his home at 42 Sentinel Parkway). Binky instantly resents the new arrival, whose cute face and perfect manners are downright annoying. Indeed, Gracie seems too perfect. So Binky decides to do some undercover investigating and discovers a shocking truth about the family guest. Soon Binky is thrust full-throttle into a situation that puts all his Space Cat skills to the ultimate test!

October 17, 2011

Education Library is CLOSED on Saturday October 22nd, 2011

There is a planned power outage for the Faculty of Education building. It is scheduled for Saturday Oct 22nd. The Education Library will be CLOSED this coming Saturday. Please note that all other Western Libraries locations normally open Saturdays will be available for Education Library users seeking study space and/or other library services such as reference or circulation. Physical collections of the Education Library will not be available but all online resources supporting education research will continue to be available.

New Book ~ Rethinking Play and Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education: Concepts, Contexts and Cultures

This information is from the publisher's website:

Bringing together a collection of chapters from international experts in the field of early childhood education, Rethinking Play and Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education seeks to explore how play in the Early Years is valued as a means of learning. The book discusses how play is presented, transformed by institutional and pedagogical discourses and ultimately experienced by children. Adopting cultural, conceptual and contextual approaches to play and pedagogy across its chapters, this book addresses contemporary emerging issues surrounding play and pedagogy.

eBook ~ Transitions to Early Care and Education: International Perspectives on Making Schools Ready for Young Children

This information is from the publisher's website:

Transitions to new educational experiences are a universal rite of passage encountered by children worldwide. This volume in the Educating the Young Child: Advances in Theory and Research, Implications for Practice series provides early childhood educators with a resource that focuses on the transitions that young children make to early care and education settings, along with the issues that surround this important time in their lives. New experiences, such as the start of formal schooling, mark important and exciting events that also evoke different reactions from children and their families. The diverse experiences, traits, and needs exhibited by young children provide early childhood educators with what may be a potentially challenging role. With an international focus, the purpose of Transitions to Early Care and Education: International Perspectives on Making Schools Ready for Young Children is to communicate an enlarged view of the transition process in order to appreciate and honor the promise and potential of all children worldwide. Contributing to this volume are a group of distinguished researchers, practitioners, and educators in the field of early childhood education. Their collective expertise is shared with those who are committed to educating and caring for young children and the families they serve.

eBook ~ Children, Development and Education: Cultural, Historical, Anthropological Perspectives

This information is from the publisher's website:

Historical anthropology is a revision of the German philosophical anthropology under the influences of the French historical school of Annales and the Anglo-Saxon cultural anthropology. Cultural-historical psychology is a school of thought which emerged in the context of the Soviet revolution and deeply affected the disciplines of psychology and education in the 20th century. This book, now available online, draws on these two schools to advance current scholarship in child and youth development and education. It also enters in dialogue with other relational approaches and suggests alternatives to mainstream western developmental theories and educational practices.

New Book ~ Parallel Learning of Reading and Writing in Early Childhood

This information is from the publisher's website:

Parallel Learning of Reading and Writing in Early Childhood explores why it's important to provide a balanced language learning environment for young children and offers approaches for children to practice and explore language. Writing - a different but parallel process - can open the door to reading, and an effective writing approach in the home and early childhood classrooms leads to the development of phonemic awareness, understanding of phonetic principles, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension. Effective early childhood teachers are those that extend the knowledge children have amassed at home and use the knowledge of how children learn naturally in the world to inform their practice.

This book offers the purpose, context, and outcomes of including writing right from the start in young children's literacy learning. Through analysis of writing samples, research, and principles of best practices, Shea outlines the essential ingredients for early language learning and provides a developmentally appropriate approach to language learning. Throughout the chapters, Shea integrates discussion of assessment, classroom environment, instructional/teacher scaffolding, and differentiating instruction across developmental levels along with the supporting theory.

New Book ~ Researching Young Children's Perspectives: Debating the Ethics and Dilemmas of Educational Research With Children

What ethical dilemmas face researchers who work with young children?


Researching Young Children's Perspectives critically examines the challenges and complexities of rights based, participatory research with children. Rather than approaching these dilemmas as problematic issues, this book positions them as important topics for discussion and reflection.

Drawing from their own rich experiences as research collaborators with young children in internationally diverse settings, the authors consider the ethical, methodological and theoretical frameworks that guide best-practice in research with young children. Each chapter poses points for consideration that will inform and challenge both the novice and experienced researcher

New Book ~ Learning to Teach in the Early Years Classroom

This information is from the publisher's website:

Learning to Teach in the Early Years Classroom helps teacher education students understand the complexities of teaching in early years' classrooms. It integrates research and theory with practice through vignettes, based on authentic classroom case studies, in order to show students how educators make decisions and achieve expected outcomes. Students are further encouraged to examine teaching practices through the experiences of Sam Davis, an imagined teacher of Prep/Grade 1, in the Junior Primary team at Aubrey Primary School. Engaging and analytical the book gives voice to the many stakeholders involved in a child's development: from principles to teachers; from families and children of diverse backgrounds to pre-service teachers on field placement.

eBook ~ Promoting Social Justice for Young Children

This information is from the publisher's website:

This book, now available online, explores important current social justice issues that confront young children in America. A broad range of topics related to the fair treatment of young children and their families are approached with a fresh and hopeful energy. The central argument of this volume is that a fair and just society must protect the basic needs of all children so they are able to reach their full potential to learn, grow, and ultimately become productive democratic citizens. The book includes contributions from an impressive group of authors who have been consistent voices for the fair and equitable treatment of children in school and society. Each chapter examines a critical issue in child social justice with a focus on the current problem, historical importance of the issue, potential solutions, and a vision for the future. The book has been developed to reach a wide audience of professionals whose work involves children and who have grown concerned about social forces that cause child suffering and threaten the well-being or even the survival of children in the United States. Readers will come away with up to date information and a renewed commitment to being life-long advocates for children.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly being updated - have a look!

New Book ~ Quality in Early Childhood Services: An International Perspective

This book examines how quality and good practice in early childhood education and care is interpreted and implemented in a variety of settings and circumstances, globally as well as nationally. Drawing on a lifetime of practice in a variety of roles and in particular using her experience of research and policy making in a wide variety of countries, the author, Helen Penn, discusses issues of quality and practice in early education and care

Education Library is CLOSED on Saturday October 22nd, 2011

There is a planned power outage for the Faculty of Education building. It is scheduled for Saturday Oct 22nd. The Education Library will be CLOSED this coming Saturday.

Please note that all other Western Libraries locations normally open Saturdays will be available for Education Library users seeking study space and/or other library services such as reference or circulation. Physical collections of the Education Library will not be available but all online resources supporting education research will continue to be available.

New Book ~ Social Pedagogy and Working with Children and Young People: Where Care and Education Meet

This information is from the publisher's website:


Social pedagogy is an innovative discipline that supports children's upbringing and overall development by focusing on the child as a whole person. It has been described as where education and care meet or as 'education in its broadest sense'.

This book provides a comprehensive overview of the theory, principles and practice of social pedagogy and the profession of social pedagogue. With chapters from leading international contributors, it outlines the roots of social pedagogy and its development in Europe, and its role in relation to individuals, groups, communities and societies. Also covered is how it applies in practice to working with children and young people in a variety of settings, including children in care and in need of family support, and its potential future applications.

This seminal book on an increasingly important topic will be essential reading for all academics, researchers and practitioners working with children.

ACCESS COPYRIGHT MEMORANDUM from Janice M. Deakin (September 1, 2011)

Here is the memo about Access Copyright from Janice M. Deakin, Provost & Vice President (Academic) dated September 1st, 2011:

The University of Western Ontario is committed to ensuring that copyright issues are dealt with in a fair and balanced way that respects both users' and creators' rights, while recognizing the University's legal obligations and the need for faculty, staff and students to have full access to all the resources that support their work, research and study.


To this end, Western has relied on a licence agreement with Access Copyright. Unfortunately, Access Copyright's decision to seek a fundamental change in the way it deals with licensing works to universities, including a substantial (in the range of 300%) increase in the fees it charges and a more invasive monitoring of copying practices, has caused higher education institutions across Canada, including Western, to rethink their relationship with Access Copyright.


AUCC is currently involved in proceedings before the Copyright Board of Canada that we hope will result in the imposition of a tariff structure that is fair and properly reflects the realities of modern post secondary education. Unfortunately that process is lengthy and the ultimate result is uncertain. As a result universities have been left in a very difficult position.


Some universities have decided to completely sever their relationship with Access Copyright. Others have decided to continue on an interim basis. The situation at each university is different and reflects many different factors. Earlier this year I asked a working group to provide me with recommendations as to how Western could operate outside of the Access Copyright tariff. That working group has made some excellent draft recommendations and is continuing its work. In reviewing those recommendations, I have determined that there is simply not enough time to implement them for this academic year in a way that would not have an adverse effect on faculty and students, and potentially on the operations of the University. For that reason I have decided that Western will not opt out of the Access Copyright Interim Tariff for the 2011-12 academic year.

We expect that there will be further developments relating to these issues over the next few months, and we will continue to work to find solutions that provide Western with the maximum flexibility in responding to these developments and that are consistent with best serving the interests of our students, faculty and staff.

Spelling Errors and Typos

Hey, I am human. I make spelling errors and typos from time to time. If you notice them, report them to me.

October 13, 2011

Education Library ~ Closed on Saturday October 22, 2011.

There is a planned power outage for the Faculty of Education building. It is scheduled for Saturday Oct 22nd. The Education Library will be CLOSED on that Saturday.

Research Trends in Mobile and Ubiquitous Learning: A Review of Publications in Selected Journals from 2001 to 2010

This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of the British Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 42, Number 4).

Abstract:

This study examines the mobile or ubiquitous learning papers published in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) database from 2001 to 2010. Two researchers who have had years of experience carrying out studies in this area were asked to filter the mobile and ubiquitous learning studies from the 3995 papers published by these six journals from 2001 to 2010. This paper reviews the advancement of mobile and ubiquitous learning research from 2001 to 2010 based on the articles published in six major SSCI journals. It is found that the number of articles has significantly increased during the past 10 years; moreover, researchers from other countries have contributed to the related field in recent years. These findings could be good references for educators and researchers who plan to contribute to the relevant studies. Furthermore, as educators have emphasized the importance of situating students to learn in a real world environment and mobile and communication technologies that could be the key to supporting effective learning in the real-world, the analysis results could help policymakers in governments and researchers in professional organizations to allocate the necessary resources and make plans for supporting future research and applications.

The Librarian is reading...

Ubiquitous Learning edited by Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis.
Exploring the anywhere/anytime possibilities for learning in the age of digital media.

Hours of Opening

Friendly Reminder: During the new teacher candidate's practicum placements the Education Library will open at 8:30 am (instead of 8:00 am). The hours of opening are:

Monday to Thursday 8:00 am to 7:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Saturday 12 noon to 5:00 pm
Sunday ~ Closed

You Have a Whole TEAM of Academic Librarians Supporting You

Yes, it is true. Because education is so multi-disciplinary, your research questions may take you into the databases and scholarly research literature of other fields. We have a whole team of academic librarians who are able to help you in specific and specialized fields. Here is the list of academic librarians and their current specialization. There is a live email link for each person so you can easily email the academic librarians on this list with questions about their area of specialization.

Everything you wanted to know about RefWorks...

...is available when you click on the RefWorks option on the far-left hand menu option on the Western Libraries' website.

RefWorks is a piece of software that is necessary to "use and learn" at the same time - much like how we all learned to use word processing or spreadsheet software. Therefore, I do not teach RefWorks just as I do not teach classes about how to use word processing software.

However, the RefWorks option on the Western Libraries' website leads you to a variety of FAQs and help pages in a varied nature to accomodate almost every learning style. Almost any question you have about learning RefWorks can be answered by reading/viewing the online Help pages.

Please create your RefWorks account and then begin using it. It works a little bit like standard word processing software because RefWorks puts items that you have imported into FOLDERS. You can name these FOLDERS anything you want so be as specific as you need to be. This is your own workspace so personalize the names of your folders to suit your learning needs and style. My folder names tend to be very specific in order to keep me organized.

So, set up your RefWorks account and give it a try.

Book List ~ Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

This is a list of some of the resources (including some children's books) related to the subjects of sexual orientation and gender identity. You will find all of these resources (and more!) in the Education Library.

Book List ~ Professional Development and Mentorship

This is a list of some of the resources related to the subject of professional development and mentorship. You will find all of these resources (and more!) in the Education Library.

Book List ~ High-Stakes Testing

This is a list of some of the resources related to the subject of high-stakes testing. You will find all of these resources (and more!) in the Education Library.

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually.

Has someone already written YOUR thesis?

Doing a thorough literature review includes searching a database called Dissertations and Theses. This database provides subject, title, and author access to almost all American dissertations accepted at an accredited institution since 1861. Masters theses have been selectively indexed since 1962. Abstracts are included for doctoral dissertation records from July 1980 to the present. The full text of over 100,000 dissertations is available now at this Web site. In addition, the Dissertations and Theses serves to disseminate citations for thousands of Canadian dissertations and an increasing number of papers accepted in institutions abroad.

Attention Educational Psychology, Special Education and Counselling Graduate Students

In addition to the the education-related research databases you will be expected to also search a databases called PsycINFO. This research database covers the professional and academic literature in psychology and related disciplines including medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, education, pharmacology, linguistics and other areas. Coverage is worldwide and includes references and abstracts to over 1,300 journals in more than 20 languages, and to book chapters and books in the English language. Over 57,000 references are added annually, and popular literature is excluded from PsycINFO.

Getting Started: Education Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Of course, since the field of education is so multi-disciplinary it is necessary for graduate students and other researchers to search other subject databases on the DATABASES list (e.g., Dissertations and Theses or PsycINFO).

October 11, 2011

Getting Started: Find the Appropriate Research Database(s)

It is easy to get started with searching the research databases to find scholarly journal articles. Many, but not all, journal articles will be available for you to read full-text online.

1. Start at the Western Libraries' website.

2. If you are working off campus, you must first connect to the Off Campus Access/Proxy server. Type in your Western Indentity username and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left-hand side of the Western Libraries' website.

3. Click on the option "Databases" which is listed under Research Tools on the far left-hand side of the page.

4. Select one of the databases you want to search from the alphabetized or subject list.

For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian education research information), ERIC or Proquest Education Journals to get started on your research.

Getting Started: Program Guides

The Program Guides provide you with a starting place for finding information for your assignments and research. You will see the Program Guides link on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website. It is listed under the heading Research Tools. When you click on the Program Guides link you will get a list of all of Western programs with links to library-created program guides.

The Education Library provides you with three Program Guides:

* Bachelor and Diploma in Education
* Continuing Teacher Education
* Education Graduate Program


Have a look at the other Program Guides, especially those listed under Social Science. The Leadership in Aboriginal Education graduate student cohort may want to take a look at the First Nations Studies program guide listed under Social Science.

Getting Started: Searching the Library Catalogue

Start Your Research by Searching our Library Catalogue!


Looking for a book by a specific author? Looking for a specific book title? Looking for resources on a specific topic? Looking for a specific journal title? Looking for any books at all on a particular topic? If you nodded "yes" to any of these questions, you want to begin your research by becoming familiar with our Library CATALOGUE.

We highly recommend that you click the CATALOGUE option at the top of the Western Libraries' website. You can search the CATALOGUE by book title, journal title, author and keyword, and there are amazing limiting and sorting features to help you make your library research process more effective and efficient ~ give the online catalogue a try!

Getting Started: The Basics of APA Tutorial

The rules of APA Style, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On the APA Style help pages you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

We recommend you spend some time with The Basics of APA Tutorial. This tutorial is designed for those who have no previous knowledge of APA Style. It shows users how to structure and format their work, recommends ways to reduce bias in language, identifies how to avoid charges of plagiarism, shows how to cite references in text, and provides selected reference examples.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library has a strong online presence and communicates with our various user groups using a wide variety of social media. The Education Library's Facebook page is very active - have a look!

Off Campus Access/EZProxy Access - Use Your Western Identity Username and Password

Do you need to use library resources from off-campus? Just sign in to the Off Campus Access/EZProxy Access with your Western Identity computer account unsername and password (this is the same combo that gets you into your UWO email account!). By doing this you can access the Western Libraries' online collection, including the databases and online journal articles, from any location.

Fall 2011 Hours of Opening

Friendly Reminder: During the Practicum periods the Education Library will open at 8:30 am (instead of 8:00 am during those weeks).

Monday to Thursday 8:00 am to 7:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Saturday 12 noon to 5:00 pm
Sunday ~ Closed

The Librarian is reading...

Shift Ed: A Call to Action for Transforming K-12 Education written by David Houle and Jeff Cobb

October 7, 2011

Happy Thanksgiving and Enjoy the Long Weekend

Best wishes for a very happy thanksgiving long weekend. The Education Library is closed all three days of the long weekend. We will see you back here on these pages on Tuesday October 11, 2011.

Transforming Internationalization Through Partnerships

This journal article appeared in the January/February 2010 issue of International Educator (Volume 19, Number 1).

Abstract:

The forces now impelling internationalization encompass the reorganization of higher education itself, a reorganization in which campus walls are disintegrating, breached by distance education, civic engagement, the global nature of science and scholarship, the emergence of excellent colleges and universities in all parts of the world, the power of postcolonial perspectives, and the globalization of the communities in which we are located. [...] we are becoming part of an academic world larger than our own institutions, and we must reconsider internationalization in this light.

The Effects of Teacher Collaboration in Grade 9 Applied Mathematics

This journal article appears in the October 2011 issue of Educational Research for Policy and Practice (Volume 10, Number 3).

Abstract:

The current emphasis of many mathematics education reform documents is on the need to change the environment of mathematics classrooms from the transmission of knowledge by the teacher to the transaction of knowledge between the teacher and the students which promotes mathematical investigation and exploration. In this article, we discuss the details of a Collaborative Teacher Inquiry Project which was aimed at increasing the quality of learning of Grade 9 Applied Mathematics, while at the same time, improving professional development opportunities for the teachers. A total of 11 schools participated in this project which spanned over three semesters. Participants included teachers, department heads, curriculum leaders, and administrators. Each school created an implementation team of administrators and teachers to implement collaborative strategies and improve teaching and learning in Grade 9 Applied Mathematics. The main benefit to the participants was that they were able to increase their knowledge and skills through collaboration in six interconnected areas: (a) achieving the goals, (b) student success, (c) professional development, (d) co-planning and co-teaching opportunities, (e) increased communication, and (f) improved technological skills. Bringing in different partners to achieve a common goal was the most challenging aspect of the project.

The Resilient Community: Implications for Out of School Programming

This article appears in the October 2011 issue of Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal (Volume 28, Number 5).

Abstract:

Out-of-school programs are often adult dominated, with minor involvement of youth in programming. Youth are seen as future citizens, not citizens of the present and expectations are set low for youth's ability to lead. The combination of low expectations and lack of opportunities for youth to meaningfully participate fails to promote youth development and social responsibility. In contrast, out-of-school programs which act as resilient communities support youth autonomy, social competence, and problem solving skills. This article presents a case study of a resilient community. The findings from this cross sectional exploratory study suggest that this resilient community promotes positive youth development outcomes.

Pipelines, Pools and Reservoirs: Building Leadership Capacity for Sustained Improvement

This article appears in a 2011 issue of the Journal of Educational Administration (Volume 49, Number 6).

Abstract:

Purpose - A crucial aspect of a school's capacity to promote and sustain change and improvement in student learning is the depth, breadth and endurance of both its formal and informal leadership. Shortages of willing leaders, however, have forced governments around the world to expend a considerable amount of time, effort, and money to fill up the leadership "pipeline" with qualified candidates for leadership positions. This paper aims to address these issues. Design/methodology/approach - This paper uses the examples of school districts in Ontario, Canada, in England and in the eastern United States to look beyond the common practice of merely filling up "pipelines" with credentialed leaders to an examination of the development of leadership "pools" and "reservoirs" of leadership capacity through distributed forms of leadership. Findings - It is found that there has been a subtle but important shift in thinking over the past few years. Where once money spent on leadership recruitment and development was considered a cost, it is now viewed as an investment and as a result some school authorities have shifted focus from "replacement planning" in which specific people are identified to fill certain jobs, to a "succession management" approach which involves building an organization's leadership capacity by identifying, recruiting, and developing a "pool" of high-potential individuals for both current and future roles. Originality/value - The paper shows that developing this pool depends in large measure on the "reservoir" of leadership capacity in an organization and perhaps most importantly, the willingness of potential leaders to come forward.

Building Bridges Between Knowledge and Practice

This article appeared in a 2011 issue of Journal of Educational Administration (Volume 49, Number 3).

Abstract:

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a Year 1 account of a partnership between a university and rural school district focusing specifically on how the project has helped to bridge the theory to practice divide and strengthen university-district ties. Design/methodology/approach - A design-based research paradigm was utilized to investigate how creating more authentic and contextually relevant university-school partnerships and embedding leadership preparation in the context of practice may help build stronger bridges between theory and practice. Findings - The findings highlight that holistic approaches to leadership preparation, developing relationships, coordinating meaningful professional development, realism in design and experiences, and introspection are all ways that cohort members, as well as other district personnel, have been able to build stronger bridges between theory and practice. Practical implications - The findings can assist universities and districts in developing and supporting partnerships that contribute to relevant, practical, and meaningful leadership preparation. Originality/value - The authors' analysis highlights that aspiring leadership students who do not engage in meaningful and contextually relevant activities will not be able to bridge the theory to practice gap when working in the actual leadership field. Authentic experiences provide realistic views and understandings of the requirements, challenges, and rewards of educational leadership positions.

Student Socialization in Interdisciplinary Doctoral Education

This journal article appears in the December 2011 issue of Higher Education (Volume 62, Number 6).

Abstract:

Interdisciplinary approaches are often seen as necessary for attacking the most critical challenges facing the world today, and doctoral students and their training programs are recognized as central to increasing interdisciplinary research capacity. However, the traditional culture and organization of higher education are ill-equipped to facilitate interdisciplinary work. This study employs a lens of socialization to study the process through which students learn the norms, values, and culture of both traditional disciplines and integrated knowledge production. It concludes that many of the processes of socialization are similar, but that special attention should be paid to overcoming organizational barriers to interdisciplinarity related to policies, space, engagement with future employers, and open discussion of the politics of interdisciplinarity.

Sustainability Transdisciplinary Education Model: Interface of Arts, Science, and Community (STEM)

This article appears in an 2011 issue of International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education (Volume 12, Number 1).

Abstract:

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the components of a sustainability transdisciplinary education model (STEM), a contemporary approach linking art, science, and community, that were developed to provide university and K-12 students, and society at large shared learning opportunities. The goals and application of the STEM curriculum will be discussed. Design/methodology/approach - The STEM integrates the sciences, arts and aesthetics, and the university with the greater New Britain community, and beyond. Academic areas included geography, environmental science, communication, art history, aesthetics, and teacher education. The transdisciplinary methodology was integrated in a learner-centered design. To achieve a cycle of community engagement regarding sustainability, university students were placed within the greater New Britain community. This included interaction with K-12 urban public schools, the New Britain Museum of American Art (NBMAA), numerous nongovernmental organizations, state and federal governmental elected officials, and the general public. Findings - As a result of the mutual learning implicit in the STEM, all participants expanded each other's understandings of sustainability. Students were learning from instructors, instructors were learning from students, students were learning from students, instructors were learning from instructors, and all were learning and sharing knowledge with the greater community. As a result, all participants gained a deeper and broader understanding about human-environment relationships and how humans impact natural resources. Practical implications - Because the assignments given to the university students were authentic performance tasks embedded in sustainability issues, students developed a broader disposition for thinking and learning and therefore become metacognitive. The STEM emphasized aesthetic education, integrating science and the arts. As a result, the participants developed their ability to connect academic domains of knowledge and creatively address sustainability challenges. Originality/value - The convergence of science, art, and aesthetics enabled the participants to develop a deeper spiritual awareness and understanding of eco-justice for the promotion of a sustainable society. The STEM utilized cultural resources of the university and New Britain community (i.e. institutional members of the NBMAA and The Central Connecticut State University). Students were introduced to the concept of mutual learning with all the communities and organizations involved.

Student-Community Engagement and the Development of Graduate Attributes

This journal article appears in a 2011 issue of Education & Training (Volume 53. Number 2/3). This issue contains several articles related to this theme that may be of interest to our Faculty of Education researchers.

Abstract:

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of student-community engagement in ensuring relevance of higher education to civil, social, economic and moral issues. It reviews the literature around three inter-related themes: calls for higher education institutions to engage with their communities; the kinds of attributes university graduates should possess for employability and citizenship; and the pedagogies of experiential learning and reflection informing student and community engagement. Design/methodology/approach - This paper evaluates and draws together international literature related to three areas: calls for universities to engage with their communities, attributes which students engaged in co-generative community relations might develop, and pedagogies which inform and develop such engagement. Findings - The paper draws a number of conclusions related to pedagogy, citizenship and the need to develop quality indicators of engagement and impact. The overarching conclusion is that student-community engagement founded on principles of mutual reciprocity enhances student attributes and is an important aspect of the modern university. Higher education needs to both retrieve the traditional civic role of the university, and also look forward to creating new approaches, so that universities are "of" the community and developing graduates as citizens. Practical implications - The paper includes policy implications for curriculum development in relation to fostering graduate attributes and citizenship. Originality/value - Through an exploration and integration of literature related to themes of university community engagement, graduate attributes and pedagogies of experiential reflective learning the paper signposts an agenda of change for universities in the twenty-first century.

October 5, 2011

Children's Text Development: Drawing, Pictures, and Writing

This journal article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Research in the Teaching of English (Volume 46, Number 1).

Abstract:

Using a sociohistoric developmental lens, this paper traces the construction of texts composed by fifth graders in an urban classroom in order to answer the following questions: How do children develop as writers in school? How do writing and drawing function in children's texts? How do teaching practices shape children's writing development? Ethnographic data collected in a fifth-grade classroom reveal how children used drawing to create classroom texts. Data show that drawing is not simply a developmental preface to writing. Rather, when given guided intellectual freedom, children integrate writing, drawing, and pictures in sophisticated and creative ways. The author traces children's text development to show how schooling as an institution bounds and limits their use of their authorial prerogatives, their textual possibilities, and ultimately their developmental potential. She concludes by asserting that we must reconsider development in writing to include not only orthographic symbols, but also the wide array of communicative tools that children bring to writing. Any analysis of development that fails to include an analysis of the corresponding institutional practices and ideologies is liable to be no more than a contribution to the efficacy of that developmental model.

A Multiliteracies Pedagogy: Exploring Semiotic Possibilities of a Disney Video in a Third Grade Diverse Classroom

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of The Urban Review (Volume 43, Number 3).

Abstract:

Disney videos are used across the US as important materials for teaching language arts and literacy in elementary schools. However, how pupils make meaning of the videos has not been sufficiently investigated in educational research. Twenty-five third-grade pupils were taught comprehension skills using Sleeping Beauty. The students created their understanding in visual images. Their drawings and explanations were analyzed using a social semiotic theory. The findings indicated that the students' interpretations of Sleeping Beauty were not a decontextualized practice; rather, they used the specificity of their gender, social-cultural experiences and available multimodal resources at their disposal to construct interpretations of the video. The implications of the findings were discussed.

Specific Language or Working Memory Impairments: A Small Scale Observational Study

This journal article appears in the October 2011 issue of Child Language Teaching and Therapy (Volume 27, Number 3). The authors are Lisa Archibald, Marc Joanisse and Alan Edmunds.

Abstract:

Study of the developmental relationship between language and working memory skills has only just begun, despite the prominent role of their interdependency in some theoretical accounts of developmental language impairments. Recently, Archibald and Joanisse (2009) identified children with specific language impairment (SLI), or specific working memory impairment (SWMI), or mixed language and working memory impairment (Mixed) based on standardized testing. In the present study, we report a first effort to provide clinical verification of these profiles by describing the social, behavioral, and academic characteristics of individual group members. Two each of children with SLI, SWMI, or Mixed impairments, individually paired with six typically developing classmates, were observed in their classroom, and their teachers completed questionnaires related to communication, working memory, and attention. Children with impairments were distinguished from typically developing children; however, relatively few patterns further distinguished the children with SLI, SWMI, and Mixed impairments. Interestingly, the children with memory impairments were found to have some language-related difficulties, and the children with language impairments, some memory-related difficulties. The limitations of these preliminary findings and future directions are discussed.

Interaction in Distance Education and Online Learning: Using Evidence and Theory to Improve Practice

This journal article appears in the December 2011 issue of Journal of Computing in Higher Education (Volume 23, Number 2-3)

Abstract:

In a recent meta-analysis of distance and online learning, Bernard et al. (2009) quantitatively verified the importance of three types of interaction: among students, between the instructor and students, and between students and course content. In this paper we explore these findings further, discuss methodological issues in research and suggest how these results may foster instructional improvement. We highlight several evidence-based approaches that may be useful in the next generation of distance and online learning. These include principles and applications stemming from the theories of self-regulation and multimedia learning, research-based motivational principles and collaborative learning principles. We also discuss the pedagogical challenges inherent in distance and online learning that need to be considered in instructional design and software development.

A positive postdoctoral experience is related to quality supervision and career mentoring, collaborations, networking and a nurturing research environment

This journal article appears in the December 2011 issue of Higher Education (Volume 62, Number 6).

Abstract:

For postdocs to have the best chances of achieving their career goals they need to not only acquire discipline-specific research experience, but also additional generic skills vital for future employment inside or outside academia. They also require access to information and mentoring that will help them strategically plan and make informed decisions about their future. Few studies have examined the variables that impact the postdoctoral experience or research productivity. Thus, a comprehensive survey was conducted to determine whether quality supervision, career mentoring, collaboration, networking and a nurturing research environment makes a positive difference in the experiences and productivity of postdoctoral researchers. Unsurprisingly, the survey revealed that job insecurity and lack of a career structure are ongoing concerns for postdocs. However, a clear association was shown between quality supervision, for example, in conveying the importance of taking responsibility for their future academic career by strengthening their track record, and the number of peer-reviewed publications produced. The findings also suggest that mentoring in non-academic career paths can be greatly improved. The results of this study have guided a research-intensive Australian University to implement initiatives and programs which enhance the postdoctoral experience. Finally this work raises awareness of the crucial contributions postdocs make to the research output and environment of universities.

Creativity in Digital Art Education Teaching Practices

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of Art Education (Volume 64, Number 5).

Abstract:

Since the introduction of personal computers, art educators increasingly have adopted new digital technologies into their pedagogy, yet overall that adoption has been a slow process (Black, 2002; Browning, 2006; Degennaro & Mak, 2002-2003; Flood & Bamford, 2007; Gude, 2007; Leonard & Leonard 2006; Lu, 2005; Mayo, 2007). [...] consistent with two art education researchers (Gouzouasis, 2001; Jackson, 1999), it was found that technology should not "drive" the preservice and in-service training; rather, teachers should begin with compelling, imaginative, and conceptual ideas.

Points of Departure: Developing the Knowledge Base of ESL and FSL Teachers for K-12 Programs in Canada

This journal article, by Western's Faculty of Education professor Farahnaz Faez, appears in the The Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics (Volume 14, Number 1, 2011).

Author's Abstract:

In this paper, I examine the contextual factors that impact the development of knowledge base of teachers of English as a second language (ESL) and French as a second language (FSL) for teaching in Kindergarten through Grade 12 programs in Ontario. Using a sociocultural orientation to second language teacher education and prominent knowledge base frameworks from the field, I discuss how a variety of local contextual factors impact the development of teacher candidates' (TC) knowledge base in pre-service teacher education programs in Canada. Individual factors include: the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of candidates' in ESL and FSL programs, the TCs' language proficiency in the target language, their personal experiences and understanding of language development, and their familiarity with real life experiences of ESL and FSL students. Beyond their own experiences, integral to TCs knowledge base are the range of student populations they could serve and the variety of language teaching contexts they can encounter in the Ontario context. I discuss the implications of such nuances for policy and practice in language teacher education programs across Canada.

Exploring the Feasibility and Benefits of Arts-Based Mindfulness-Based Practices with Young People in Need: Aiming to Improve Aspects of Self-Awareness and Resilience

This journal article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Child and Youth Care Forum (Volume 40, Number 4).

Abstract:

Research in mindfulness-based methods with young people is just emerging in the practice/research literature. While much of this literature describes promising approaches that combine mindfulness with cognitive-behavioral therapy, this paper describes an innovative research-based group program that teaches young people in need mindfulness-based methods using arts-based methods. The paper presents qualitative research findings that illustrate how young people in need (children and youth involved with child protection and/or mental health systems) can benefit from a creative approach to mindfulness that can teach them emotional regulation, social and coping skills, and that can improve aspects of their self-awareness, self-esteem, and resilience.

A Search for Meaning: Recognizing the Potential of Narrative Research in Social Policy-Making Efforts

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of Sexuality Research & Social Policy (Volume 8, Number 3).

Abstract:

In recent decades, narrative research has gained increasing prominence in social and health sciences. However, the role that narrative research has played in social policy-making efforts has been small compared to that of quantitative research. This paper highlights the ways in which theoretical stances, questions, methods, and findings from narrative research can be useful in social policy-making arenas. Particular attention is paid to research conducted in the narrative study of lives tradition in psychology, gerontology, and related social sciences. Narrative research that seeks to understand individual lives in all their complexity and in the contexts in which they are lived can be particularly useful in informing sexuality-related policy concerns given the complex nature of sexuality. By focusing on the current policy concern of same-sex relationship recognition, this paper demonstrates that (a) narrative research offers much to the study of social policy and social justice via its ability to illuminate the complex interplay between everyday lived experience and social structures and (b) there is a need to redefine what counts as research evidence in policy-making efforts to be more inclusive of narrative work. In making these arguments, examples of recent narrative research are highlighted regarding their direct relevance to sexuality-related social policy. The paper concludes with suggestions by which researchers and policy makers can productively incorporate narrative research into their work by focusing on the complimentary potential for findings from quantitative and narrative research.

Adolescent Males in Dance: A Closer Look at Their Journey

This article appeared in the September 2011 issue of Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (Volume 82, Number 7).

Abstract:

For junior male students who hesitate to participate in dance, the presence of these senior peers helps them to overcome their doubts and insecurities. Because these adolescent males have taken dance for a number of years, they have the skill and confidence to demonstrate in front of other students.

Student Use of Facebook for Organizing Collaborative Classroom Activities

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (Volume 6, Number 3).

Abstract:

Social network sites such as Facebook are often conceived of as purely social spaces; however, as these sites have evolved, so have the ways in which students are using them. In this study, we examine how undergraduate students use the social network site Facebook to engage in classroom-related collaborative activities (e.g., arranging study groups, learning about course processes) to show how Facebook may be used as an informal tool that students use to organize their classroom experiences, and explore the factors that predict type of use. Data from two surveys (N=302, N=214) are used to analyze how Facebook use, social and psychological factors, self-efficacy, and types of instructor-student communication on Facebook are related to positive and negative collaboration among students. We found that predictors of Facebook use for class organizing behaviors include self-efficacy and perceived motivation to communicate with others using the site. When placed in the context of social and psychological factors, Facebook intensity did not predict either positive or negative collaboration, suggesting that how students used the site, rather than how often they used the tool or how important they felt it was, affected their propensity to collaborate.

The Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library has a very active Facebook page - have a look!

Bully/Victim Problems Among Preschool Children: A Review of Current Research Evidence

This journal article appears in the September 2011 issue of Educational Psychology Review (Volume 23, Issue Number 3).

Abstract:

Bullying in schools has been identified as a serious and complex worldwide problem associated with negative short- and long-term effects on children's psychosocial adjustment (Smith 1999; Ttofi and Farrington, Aggressive Behav 34(4):352-368, 2008). Entering kindergarten is a crucial developmental step in many children's lives mainly because it is within this context where they participate, for the first time, as members in a stable peer group and well-organized team activities. Consequently, preschool may be the first context beyond the home environment where children's difficulties in social interactions with peers can be primarily detected and assessed by adults and professionals. This paper reviews recent empirical evidence over the nature and different aspects of bullying among preschool children. Recent findings concerning the development of preschool bullying and its prevalence, family and genetic factors, gender and age differences, participant and peripheral roles, school context, methodological issues, and prevention policies are reviewed while directions for future research are addressed.

E-technology and Work/Life Balance for Academics with Young Children

This journal article was published in the October 2011 issue of Higher Education (Volume 62, Issue Number 4).

Abstract:

Since the late 1980s, research on post-industrialized economies shows that the boundary between work and family is increasingly becoming blurred. The continuing evolution of e-technology allows work for some to be done anywhere, anytime. This article examines the degree to which e-technology has transferred work into the home lives of academics and how this has affected their work/life balance. Drawing on a study in an Australian university of academics with young children, we utilise the terms 'work extensification' and 'work intensification' to explore whether these new technologies are a blessing or a curse in their work lives. At the same time we describe the deteriorating working conditions for Australian academics whose work has intensified and extended into their private lives with longer working hours in a speeded up environment. Our findings revealed the use of metaphors such as invasion and intrusion of e-technologies into academics' homes and their need to establish boundaries to separate work and family life. Most felt that having e-technologies at home was of benefit to their work but they came at a cost to their family life--delivering a blessing and a curse.

The Librarian is reading...

Keys to the 21st Century edited by Jérôme Bindé.

Are we prepared for the 21st century? there is room for doubt. The future seems increasingly uncertain, hard to decipher, ambiguous in its very indeterminism, sometimes frankly illegible.

September 29, 2011

Thank You!

A special thank you goes out to The University of Western Ontario Faculty Association (UWOFA) and The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT). Both of these amazing organizations rallied in support of Western's Librarians and Archivists. Under dedicated leadership UWOFA and CAUT helped make the often invisible work of academic librarianship visible, not only to our own local campus community, but also to the broader academic community on a national level.

September 27, 2011

We are back!

Your Education Librarians, Christena McKillop and Denise Horoky, are back at work after being on a picket line for a 14 day strike. Being on strike and walking a picket line was a new experience for Western's academic librarians and archivists. Negotiating a fair and equitable collective agreement during a strike was a new experience for Western's administration. The learning curve for both sides was steep. Labour disputes are times of profound professional challenges. But, at the same time, they can also be a conduit to professional (and personal) reflection and productive dialogue. We appreciate the outstanding support we received from this Faculty of Education during this time. With grateful hearts, we thank you!

Maurice Sendak at 83: A portrait of the author as a cranky old man

I was reading this Globe and Mail newspaper article the other day and one of Mr. Sendak's answers in the interview made me smile:

So I'm doing a book again that's called a children's book. Why is it called a children's book? You got me, baby. People seem to know what is a children's book and what isn't a children's book and I have never, ever claimed to know.

Database ~ ODESI (Ontario Data Documentation, Extraction Service and Infrastructure)

Established in 2007, ODESI (Ontario Data Documentation, Extraction Service and Infrastructure) is a digital repository for social science data, including polling data. It is a web-based data exploration, extraction and analysis tool that uses the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) social science data standard.

ODESI provides researchers the ability to search for survey questions (variables) across thousands of datasets. ODESI contains over 2926 datasets, with an additional 11491 survey records available for browsing.

Database ~ OECD iLibrary

OECD iLibrary is OECD's Online Library for Books, Papers and Statistics and the gateway to OECD's analysis and data. It replaces SourceOECD, and hosts all content so users can find - and cite - tables and databases as easily as articles or chapters.

OECD iLibrary contains all the publications and datasets released by OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), International Energy Agency (IEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), OECD Development Centre, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), and International Transport Forum (ITF) since 1998 - over 1 000 journal issues, 2 900 working papers, 2 500 multi-lingual summaries, 6 200 e-book titles, 14 000 tables and graphs, 21 000 chapters and articles, and 390 complete databases with more than 4 billion data points.

New Book ~ Literacy's Beginnings: Supporting Young Readers and Writers (Sixth Edition)

This information is from the publisher's web site:

The new sixth edition of this widely popular resource continues to offer readers an integrated approach to reading and writing instruction keyed to the five typical stages through which most children pass: the IRA/NAEYC phases of literacy. It is designed to help pre- and in-service teachers be aware of and supportive of children's literacy knowledge as it grows and changes from birth through eight years of age. It gives readers a thorough understanding of the long continuum of literacy growth and how teachers can guide children as they move along the continuum.

The emphasis is on student-centered and constructivist theory and practices, yet the authors also stress the need for direct, systematic, assessment-driven instruction. They keep their focus on early learners in preschool through the primary grades, and where applicable, they show readers the value of certain activities and practices for slightly older children.

In this edition, the authors continue to explain the literacy development of children at different developmental levels and to provide information about assessing children at each of those levels. Included are new expanded sections on differentiating instruction for struggling readers and writers, for children who are English Language Learners, and for children who have been identified as needing more intensive instruction as part of the Response to Intervention process. Also expanded are new sections in many chapters providing Technology Tie-Ins sending readers to exemplary websites and suggesting methods of integrating technology with reading and writing instruction.

Readers will find that the numerous, rich examples of children's work included in case studies illustrating the concepts are expanded even further in this new edition to provide examples of diverse children in a variety of settings. The assessments in the Appendices have been expanded, giving teachers a greater variety of useful measures to try out with children.

New Book: Self-Study Teacher Research: Improving Your Practice Through Collaborative Inquiry

This information is from the publisher's website:

Designed to help teachers plan, implement, and assess a manageable self-study research project, this unique textbook covers the foundation, history, theoretical underpinnings, and methods of self-study research. Written in a reader-friendly style and filled with interactive activities and examples, this book helps teachers every step of the way as they plan and conduct their studies. Author Anastasia Samaras encourages readers to think deeply about both the "how" and the "why" of this essential professional development tool as they pose questions and formulate personal theories to improve professional practice.

New Book: Evidence-Based Instruction in Reading: A Professional Development Guide to Culturally Responsive Instruction

This information is from the publisher's website:

A part of the Evidence-Based Instruction series, this book pinpoints how to deliver effective literacy instruction to diverse students using a culturally responsive approach. Designed in an interactive format, Evidence-Based Instruction in Reading: A Professional Development Guide to Culturally Responsive Instruction features easy-to-implement instructional strategies, research-based practices, questions that prompt collaboration, space for note-taking and a template that ensures professional development and participation. Tools are included to assess students' cultures and reading skills, as well as teachers' instruction and diversity readiness. A complete set of resource-based appendices provide additional book club ideas, a sample cultural interview, an essential primary grade sight word list and graphic organizer templates.

The Librarian is reading...

"The Sorcerers and Their Apprentices: How the Digital Magicians of the MIT Media Lab Are Creating the Innovative Technologies That Will Transform Our Lives" by Frank Moss.

Book Description:

If you've ever read a book on an e-reader, unleashed your inner rock star playing Guitar Hero, built a robot with LEGO Mindstorms, or ridden in a vehicle with child-safe air bags, then you've experienced first hand just a few of the astounding innovations that have come out of the Media Lab over the past 25 years.


But that's old hat for today's researchers, who are creating technologies that will have a much deeper impact on the quality of people's lives over the next quarter century.

In this exhilarating tour of the Media Lab's inner sanctums, we'll meet the professors and their students - the Sorcerers and their Apprentices - and witness first hand the creative magic behind inventions such as:

* Nexi, a mobile humanoid robot with such sophisticated social skills she can serve as a helpful and understanding companion for the sick and elderly.
* CityCar, a foldable, stackable, electric vehicle of the future that will redefine personal transportation in cities and revolutionize urban life.
* Sixth Sense, a compact wearable device that transforms any surface - wall, tabletop or even your hand - into a touch screen computer.
* PowerFoot, a lifelike robotic prosthesis that enables amputees to walk as naturally as if it were a real biological limb.

Through inspiring stories of people who are using Media Lab innovations to confront personal challenges - like a man with cerebral palsy who is unable to hum a tune or pick up an instrument yet is using an ingenious music composition system to unleash his "inner Mozart", and a woman with a rare life-threatening condition who co-invented a revolutionary web service that enables patients to participate in the search for their own cures - we'll see how the Media Lab is empowering us all with the tools to take control of our health, wealth, and happiness.

Along the way, Moss reveals the highly unorthodox approach to creativity and invention that makes all this possible, explaining how the Media Lab cultivates an open and boundary-less environment where researchers from a broad array of disciplines - from musicians to neuroscientists to visual artists to computer engineers - have the freedom to follow their passions and take bold risks unthinkable elsewhere.

The Sorcerers and Their Apprentices can serve as a blueprint for how to fix our broken innovation ecosystem and bring about the kind of radical change required to meet the challenges of the 21st century. It is a must-read for anyone striving to be more innovative as an individual, as a businessperson, or as a member of society.

Also includes 16 pages of color photos highlighting some of the lab's most visually stunning inventions - and the people who make them possible.

July 29, 2011

Summer Hiatus

The Education Library Blog is now on a summer hiatus - see you back here on these pages in September.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated - take a look!

Education Library on Twitter

The Education Library will re-join Twitter in September - please follow us!

Civic Holiday ~ Monday August 1st

The Education Library is closed on Monday August 1st for the Civic Holiday.

Today - Friday July 29 - we are migrating to a new ProQuest platform

Today, Friday July 29th - Western Libraries will be migrating to a new platform for ProQuest databases - including CBCA Education, ERIC, Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Education Journals, and PsycINFO. Any existing links to databases on the old platform will be redirected to the new platform following the migration, so that any links (such as those in WebCT, for example) will continue to work after July 29th.

Our main floor computer tables are bare - but not for long!

Western Libraries will begin upgrading public workstations in all library locations starting July 25th in anticipation of the Fall term. Just this past week the computer terminals on the main floor of the Education Library were removed in preparation for the installation of new computers in the upcoming month. Those visiting the library throughout the month of August may notice library staff removing and/or installing equipment as we upgrade and re-deploy our computing resources. Western Libraries appreciates your patience while we ready our computing environment for September.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

After you log in to RefWorks, look in the upper right corner of the page for the "RefWorks 2.0" link. Click on it, and you will immediately be switched to RefWorks 2.0. All of your references, folders, and preferences will be automatically converted: you won't lose anything.

The RefWorks Classic interface is being discontinued, and all users will be converted to RefWorks 2.0 in early August.

Library Hours for Fall - Winter

During the Fall - Winter terms the Education Library hours of operation will be:

Monday to Thursday 8:00 am to 7:00 pm

Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Saturday 12 noon to 5:00 pm

Sunday Closed


Please Note: During the Practicum periods the Library will open at 8:30 am instead of 8:00 am during those weeks.

New Book ~ Teacher Education for Inclusion: Changing Paradigms and Innovative Approaches

This information is from the publisher's website:

How teachers might best be prepared to work in schools with an increasingly diverse pupil population is of concern to educational academics, professionals and governments around the world. Changes that have taken place in legislation and practice often fail to taken into account how practitioners can ensure that all children and young people are able to achieve.

The focus of this international text is on innovative practices for preparing teachers to work in inclusive classrooms and schools. Drawing on both pre and in-service training methods, the expert contributors to this book follow three major themes:

* social and political challenges regarding teacher education - providing an historical perspective on the training of teachers, tensions in preparing teachers for inclusion, cultural issues, the relationship between educational funding and practices and collaborative measures to support a whole school approach

* innovative approaches in pre-service teacher preparation - discussing a range of innovative models and approaches used in pre-service teacher education courses

* engaging professional development for inservice teachers - reviewing a range of approaches employed to engage working teachers and help them establish curricula and pedagogy that meets the needs of all students in their classes.

Each chapter will include a list of proposed learning outcomes, a theoretical or conceptual framework to help readers develop the proposed innovation, an overview of recent research, discussion of the research data available and a discussion of the international implications and challenges, summarising in suggestions for a positive way forward.

New Book ~ How Teachers Learn: An Educational Psychology of Teacher Preparation

This information is from the publisher's website:

The essential goal for teacher education seems clear: to provide our nation's schools with the best possible teacher candidates. This statement is a basic one, yet the ramifications for our nation's children and our country's future are critical.

In the words of editor Michael D. Andrew, "Good teachers are at the heart of good schools, and to produce better teachers is to proportionately produce better education." This book shows us how to provide the best possible preparation for our nation's teachers. Through a case study of the five-year teacher education program at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and selected research articles and convention presentations related to the program, How Teachers Learn documents the evolution and achievements of a program that is a model of the best practices for teacher preparation.

New Book ~ Studying Diversity in Teacher Education

This information is from the publisher's website:

Studying Diversity in Teacher Education is a collaborative effort by experts seeking to elucidate one of the most important issues facing education today. First, the volume examines historically persistent, yet unresolved issues in teacher education and presents research that is currently being done to address these issues. Second, it centers on research on diverse populations, bringing together both research on diversity and research on diversity in teacher education. The contributors present frameworks, perspectives and paradigms that have implications for reframing research on complex issues that are often ignored or treated too simplistically in teacher education literature. Concluding the volume with an agenda for future research and a guide for preparing teachers for diversity education in a global context, the contributors provide a solid foundation for all educators. Studying Diversity in Teacher Education is a vital resource for all those interested in diversity and education research.

New Book ~ Practicing What We Teach: How Culturally Responsive Literacy Classrooms Make a Difference

This information is from the publisher's website:

This readable book features K-12 teachers and teacher educators who report their experiences of culturally responsive literacy teaching in primarily high poverty, culturally nondominant communities.

These extraordinary teachers show us what culturally responsive literacy teaching looks like in their classrooms and how it advances children's academic achievement. This collection captures different dimensions of culturally responsive (CR) practice, such as linking home and school, using culturally responsive literature, establishing relationships with children and parents, using cultural connections, and teaching English language learners and children who speak African American language.

This engaging collection:

* Provides a window into what teachers actually do and think when they serve culturally diverse children, including classroom-tested teaching practices.

* Depicts teachers enacting CR teaching in the presence of scripted curricula and rigid testing schedules.

* Covers childhood, secondary, and higher education classrooms.

* Helps readers imagine how they can transform their own classrooms through "Make it in Your Classroom" sections at the end of each chapter.

* Includes a "Becoming a Culturally Responsive Teacher" self-evaluation form.

New Book ~ Grow Your Own Teachers: Grassroots Change for Teacher Education

This information is from the publisher's website:

Grow Your Own Teachers describes the evolution of a local school reform movement in Chicago that now serves as a model for change in schools and teacher preparation programs across the country. Grounded in the grassroots organizing tradition, the Grow Your Own (GYO) teacher initiative involves collaboration between community-based organizations and colleges of education in preparing community members to teach for change in their local schools. Incorporating rich stories and the perspectives of foremost teacher educators, students, and community leaders, this book offers an alternative framework for teacher education that will provide urban students with the education they deserve. It will also provide adult community members with an example of higher education that can lead to a rewarding professional career.

New Book ~ Breaking the Mold of Preservice and Inservice Teacher Education: Innovative and Successful Practices for the 21st Century

Summary of this book is from the publisher's website:

This unique collection takes the reader on a tour to explore innovative preservice and inservice teacher education practices from many regions of the United States, Canada and the world. Each of the chapters offers an authentic, documentary account of successful initiatives that break the traditional mold of teacher education.

Section I presents unique preservice teacher preparation programs and initiatives. These chapters offer compelling ideas to readers who seek change in the higher education model of teacher training.

Section II features inservice education for both the novice and veteran teacher. The chapters included in this section of the book offer stories of innovation as professional development initiatives. Each of the programs describes the setting or context in which the innovation takes place and focuses on the role of teachers and students.

Chapters in Section III highlight the benefits of collaborative teacher education practices. Through the lens of community and with the tools of cooperation and support, innovative practices are described for the improvement of student learning.

Section IV offers less commonly presented diverse, global perspectives on teacher education. The sharing of ideas through global examples highlight the similarities in educational practices and common goals across the world.

People We Know: Ron Hansen

Ron Hansen's article, "Stuck in the Groove: A Critique of Compulsory Schooling" appears in the Summer 2011 issue of Education Canada (Volume 51, Number 3).

Summary:

Learning in formal schools violates several simple principles: that no one can learn on an empty spirit; that true learning requires an absence of fear or authority; that learning is the most natural of human instincts. By making schooling compulsory, we have abandoned trust in our individual and collective experience in favour of experts and institutions. Compulsory schooling assumes that assimilation into society via academic achievement is a right and a necessity for all citizens, predicated on the notion that matters of the mind are superior to matters of the body and spirit. Recent research, however, suggests the "academic-diet-for-everyone" assumption is flawed.

The Librarian is reading...

Drinking with Miss Dutchie by Ed Breslin.


Summary of book from the publisher's website:

Drinking with Miss Dutchie is a story about Dutchie, a Black Labrador, and her lasting impact on the life of her owner and narrator, Ed Breslin. In contrast to the typical tale of dog as man's best friend, Breslin's is a unique reflection on dog as role model and teacher. While the author struggles with clinical depression and addiction, Dutchie maintains her pure lust for life. Over twelve years, she masterfully and instinctively shows Breslin how to view the world for what it is - and embrace it with full force.


Raised in North Philadelphia, the second oldest of twelve children in an Irish Catholic family, Breslin recounts his lifelong struggles with alcoholism and depression, and his exquisitely loving, 30-year marriage to his wife Lynn. Breslin tells us how Dutchie, through her elegant negotiation of the world's difficulties and upheavals, showed him how to quell his fears, unwittingly modeled how to strengthen his relationships, and encouraged him to live in the present.

Marcel Proust wrote: "The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes." Dutchie's were Breslin's new eyes, exemplifying for him the nature of altruism, purity and awareness of others. Drinking with Miss Dutchie is a memoir, but it is also a narrative on moving forward, on identifying what matters, and on staying true to it. Dutchie is Breslin's best self, and his is a story that ultimately describes the incredible power of animals to bring us to our senses.

July 25, 2011

Technology Upgrade Begins

Western Libraries will begin upgrading public workstations in all library locations starting July 25th in anticipation of the Fall term. Those visiting the library during this last week of July and throughout the month of August may notice library staff removing and/or installing equipment as we upgrade and re-deploy our computing resources. Western Libraries appreciates your patience while we ready our computing environment for September.

Understanding New Teachers' Professional Identities Through Metaphor

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 4).

Abstract:

This qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews examines the metaphors new teachers use to describe their professional identities and compares metaphors chosen immediately following graduation with those suggested part way through their first year of teaching. Findings indicate that new teachers make a shift from seeing themselves as ready for the challenge, to adopting a survival mode. The metaphors suggest that new teachers struggle to develop a professional identity during their first year, and that this development process is gradual, complex and often problematic. Implications for teacher education indicate that greater emphasis needs to be placed on exploring professional identity in pre-service programmes.

The First Three Years: Experiences of Early Career Teachers (ECTs)

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice (Volume 17, Number 3).

Abstract:

This study considers two discourses of current relevance to national and international educators - early professional learning (EPL) and curriculum change. Induction arrangements for early career teachers (ECTs), EPL and informal learning have received considerable attention in the past few years. Changes to induction inevitably have knock-on consequences for EPL and beginning teacher development. The study examines the transition period between induction and postinduction for ECTs. Curriculum change is a universal theme in education and the responsibility of all teachers. Data are presented regarding ECTs' perceived experiences relating to enabling and constraining EPL influences and curriculum change. Qualitative semi-structured interview data were collected from 14 early career secondary geography teachers in Scotland as they reflected on their first three years of teaching. Their collective accounts provide a window into their first three years of teaching. Findings suggest that the professional relationships forged within schools, especially at departmental level, and during continuing professional development are major factors in enabling or constraining ECTs' EPL and in shaping their attitudes and engagement with curricular change. Suggestions for policy are discussed and recommendations for future research suggested.

Integrating to Learn and Learning to Integrate: A Case Study of an Online Master's Program on Science-Mathematics Integration for Middle School Teachers

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of The Internet and Higher Education (Volume 14, Number 3).

Abstract:

iSMART (Integration of Science, Mathematics, and Reflective Teaching) Program is an online science and mathematics integrated graduate program for middle school teachers across the state of Texas. As part of a large design-based research project, this paper describes the initial stages of the design process of the iSMART program for its first cohort in the fall of 2010 with a focus on program development. The paper begins with our theoretical perspective and rationale for our use of design-based research methodology. We then provide a review of literature on the integration of science and mathematics and the design of online learning environments. Next, we report on the decisions made by science and mathematics teacher educators in the early process of iSMART design as well as the online design components. Finally, we provide our plan for the continuous implementation and redesign of the program with the first cohort of 25 iSMART teachers.

Linguistically Diverse Children and Educators (Re)Forming Early Literacy Policy

This article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Early Childhood Education Journal (Volume 39, Number 2).

Abstract:

The current context of increased accountability and the proliferation of skills-based literacy mandates at the early childhood level pose particular tensions for multilingual children and educators. In this article, we draw on data from two ethnographic studies to examine how educators and children negotiate the constraints of early childhood curricular mandates within two New York City schools with multilingual populations and long traditions of attending to their linguistic, cultural, and social resources. Our data documents how educators sought to understand, grapple with, and (re)form early literacy policies to make spaces for student languages, collaboration, and inquiry. We found that young children distinguished between scripted practices and authentic literacy learning, and despite constraints found openings to bend the curriculum to suit their linguistic, intellectual, and social repertoires. The studies also emphasized the role of administrators and teachers in navigating--and mitigating--curricular mandates that were often contradictory to the bilingual missions and practices of their schools and at times conflicting and confusing in and of themselves. We argue that while policy is very much a participant in today's early literacy contexts, it is not deterministic. All members of the school community have an impact on mediating how policy is enacted and creating alternative opportunities for learning. The findings of these complementary studies illustrate how multilingual children and educators negotiated policy mandates in order to affirm the intellectual and cultural traditions of their schools.

Applied Ethics as a Foundation in Early Childhood Teacher Education: Exploring the Connections and Possibilities

This article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Early Childhood Education Journal (Volume 38, Number 6).

Abstract:

This project explores how one early childhood preparation program integrated applied ethics in introductory coursework. Recognizing that students enter teacher education with well-formed values and beliefs regarding children and teaching, carefully planned learning experience and encounters in real life learning contexts expand their understanding of the complexity of ethical decisionmaking in early care and education programs. This project documents students' perspectives toward their role as meaning-makers through the analysis of assignments intended to promote reflection on values. As students engage with course content and gain practical experience, their knowledge and beliefs regarding teaching evolve together demonstrating the power of ethical thinking in enhancing early childhood teacher education. The findings indicate that students draw on their image of children, social justice, and self-awareness in their development of a professional ethical identity.

Teaching Teachers: An Investigation of Beliefs in Teacher Education Students

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Learning Environments Research (Volume 14, Number 1).

Abstract:

Influenced by work on learner-centred education, teacher efficacy and teachers' concerns, we conducted an investigation of the influence of 185 preservice teachers' teacher efficacy and concerns on their learner-centred beliefs. Learner-centred beliefs were selected for the purposes of this study as the best indicator of future teaching actions because these preservice teachers had not yet entered the classroom or engaged in teaching practices. Preservice teacher efficacy and concerns, individually and collectively, significantly influenced learner-centred beliefs. These findings indicate that teacher education can facilitate the development of learner-centred beliefs by addressing these trainable characteristics and demonstrate the need to further explore both teacher efficacy and concerns as they relate to learner-centred education within teacher education programs.

The Role of Educational Psychology in Teacher Education: Three Challenges for Educational Psychologists

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Educational Psychologist (Volume 46, Number 2).

Abstract:

We argue that this is a crucial time for educational psychology as a field to refocus its attention on the evidence base for its contribution to teacher education. In revisiting the recommendations of the APA Division 15 committee charged with examining the role of educational psychology in teacher education (Anderson et al., 1995), we note positive changes in educational psychology courses for preservice teachers. We then identify and discuss three immediate challenges for educational psychologists: (a) communicating the relevance of educational psychology research to the wider education community, (b) developing collaborative relationships with colleagues in teacher education programs that support a common discourse and shared vision of effective teacher preparation, and (c) documenting the ways that educational psychology courses make a difference to the practice of graduating teachers and to the educational experiences of their K-12 students. We conclude with suggestions for addressing these challenges.

Thinking and Acting Both Locally and Globally: New Issues for Teacher Education

This article appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Education for Teaching (Volume 37, Number 2).

Abstract:

Over the course of education's history, there have been four key shifts in the way in which education has been seen and organised. These are identified as Thinking and Acting Individually, Thinking and Acting Locally, Thinking Nationally and Acting Locally, and Thinking Internationally and Acting Locally. Each shift has seen a new set of imperatives for schools and teacher education. These changes now seem to be coming more frequently and the paper argues that, since we still have not achieved a quality education for all students, one further shift is needed, to Thinking and Acting both Globally and Locally. Such a move has implications for educational policy, and for both school and classroom practice. In turn, this shift identifies implications for the education of teachers and school leaders. The paper identifies what some of these changes might be and what teacher education needs to do to prepare teachers and school leaders for an increasingly complex future.

Changing Leadership: Teachers Lead the Way for Schools that Learn

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 5).

Abstract:

This paper presents findings from a three-year, qualitative study of teachers enrolled in a Masters of Teacher Leadership program. Researchers sought to understand the ways teachers' beliefs about and understandings of teacher leadership were affected by their participation in a formal teacher leadership program, as well as the kinds of actions they took up as a result of this participation. Data indicate three significant ways participants' work as teacher leaders was developed and enhanced, including: (a) identifying and amplifying their professional voice, (b) deepening and extending their voice as they plan, and (c) reframing their work/shift responsibility through constructing widening circles of influence and impact. Authors identify implications of their research for growing teacher leaders, school improvement and change, changing school culture, enhancing student engagement, and building new structures.

Developing Situated Knowledge about Teaching with Technology via Web-Enhanced Case-Based Activity

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

Situated, case-based approaches, featuring virtual teachers' activity and reasoning in university classrooms, may provide a viable alternative to immersive field-based apprenticeships. Despite widespread advocacy on situated teacher education, research on preservice teachers' situated learning remains rare. This study examined how preservice teachers gain situated knowledge about teaching with technology by engaging the experiences of practicing teachers through Web-enhanced, Case-based activity (CBA). Situated knowledge of exemplary teachers often espouses a constructivist epistemology and a student-centered pedagogy when they use computers for teaching. Also, their knowledge for teaching with technology requires linking computer skills with associated curriculum and pedagogical strategies. Based on this initial framework, in this study, preservice teachers' changes in perceptions and understanding about teaching with technology were documented over the course of a semester. A qualitative case study was used, and constant comparative methods were used to continually compare emerging themes and refine categories. Web-enhanced CBA helped most preservice teachers to both understand appropriate uses of technology and refined their perspectives by using experienced teachers' captured knowledge and practices. Research is needed to refine our understanding of situated case-based approaches' potential to promote both meaningful technology integration knowledge and skill and to address a range of everyday classroom teaching and learning issues, decisions, and practices.

Technology Upgrade Begins

Western Libraries will begin upgrading public workstations in all library locations starting July 25th in anticipation of the Fall term. Those visiting the library during this last week of July and throughout the month of August may notice library staff removing and/or installing equipment as we upgrade and re-deploy our computing resources. Western Libraries appreciates your patience while we ready our computing environment for September.

ProQuest Databases

On Friday July 29th Western Libraries will be migrating to a new platform for ProQuest databases - including CBCA Education, ERIC, Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Education Journals, and PsycINFO. Any existing links to databases on the old platform will be redirected to the new platform following the migration, so that previous links (such as those in WebCT, for example) will continue to work after July 29th.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

Civic Holiday - Monday August 1st

The Education Library will be closed on Monday August 1st to celebrate the Civic Holiday.

The Librarian is reading...

The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger


Summary from the publisher's website:

Audrey Niffenegger, the New York Times bestselling author of The Time Traveler's Wife and Her Fearful Symmetry, has crafted her first graphic novel after the success of her two critically acclaimed "novels-in-pictures." First serialized as a weekly column in the UK's Guardian newspaper, The Night Bookmobile tells the story of a wistful woman who one night encounters a mysterious disappearing library on wheels that contains every book she has ever read. Seeing her history and most intimate self in this library, she embarks on a search for the bookmobile. But her search turns into an obsession, as she longs to be reunited with her own collection and memories.

The Night Bookmobile is a haunting tale of both transcendence and the passion for books, and features the evocative full-color pen-and-ink work of one of the world's most beloved storytellers.


Review from Publisher's Weekly:

Novelist and visual artist Niffenegger brings the dark dreaminess that characterized her bestselling novels to her first full-length graphic novel. After a fight with her boyfriend one night, Alexandra goes for a walk and comes upon a bookmobile. When she goes inside to look at the books, she discovers that it's a library of her own reading history; every book she's ever read, including her diary, is on the shelf. As her life continues, she searches for the bookmobile, but years go by before she finds it again. Meanwhile she becomes a librarian and a loner, eventually deciding that she wants to work in the bookmobile, though the price for doing so is high. Niffenegger's full-color art has a naïve tone, with sometimes stiff figures, and text written in childlike script. The simplicity of the images contrasts with sophisticated page layouts in which she plays with panels and perspective. The story was originally serialized in the Guardian, and in an afterword, Niffenegger reveals that the book is the first volume in a larger project. At heart this romantic, melancholy tale is a paean to reading and to the life one person lives through books.

July 21, 2011

The Role of Privilege as Identity in Adolescents' Beliefs about Homelessness, Opportunity, and Inequality

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Youth & Society (Volume 43, Number 1).

Abstract:

This mixed methods study investigated the impact of learning about homelessness on the civic development of privileged adolescents. Pre-post surveys, classroom observations, and qualitative interviews revealed that the participating adolescents developed a more complex understanding of the factors that contribute to homelessness; however, this deeper understanding of homelessness was not accompanied by a reconfiguring of participants' beliefs about America's opportunity structure. Instead, this study's privileged adolescents defended their own positions within the existing class structure by invoking legitimizing, and naturalizing ideological frames. This resistance to social justice content impeded participating teens' development of civic responsibility for fellow citizens contending with poverty and homelessness.

Framing Discourses of Possibility and Constraint in the Empowerment of Muslim Girls: Issues of Religion, Race, Ethnicity and Culture

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Race, Ethnicity and Education (Volume 14, Number 2).

Abstract:

This paper presents the stories of three female Muslim educators actively engaged in empowering Muslim girls in their school/community liaison roles. The stories are drawn from a broader qualitative and predominantly interview-based research project that investigated issues of teaching and social justice in three English schools. Through lenses that recognise the dynamic, complex and contradictory narratives that shape Muslim girls' identities, the paper draws attention to the women's discursive positionings and, in particular, how such positionings generate "framing discourses" that both shut down and open up possibilities to support Muslim girls. The first story illustrates how the discursive position of "Ashley", a white, Western woman who has recently converted to Islam, generates "incomplete framing discourses" that homogenise the girls' culture and thus ignore or de-legitimise significant issues of race and ethnicity in the girls' lives. The second story provides an account of "Abida" and "Sati's" discursive positioning as women of Pakistani and Bangladeshi heritage. Their alternative framing discourses bring to light and give status to the range and complexity of the discourses that shape the girls' identities. In juxtaposing these stories, the paper highlights the importance of educators being conscious of and critically examining their own discursive positioning in their construction and support of Muslim girls; and draws attention to the continued imperative of disrupting the epistemic privilege of Western-informed views of female empowerment and of listening to feminist voices from the margins
.

The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

This article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Journal for Specialists in Group Work (Volume 36, Number 1),

Abstract:

Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work (RMSGW), offering a trans-theoretical framework through which group leaders and supervisors can plan and implement group interventions. Application of the LGBTQ RMSGW is described, with implications for practice and future research discussed.

Global Crises, Social Justice, and Teacher Education

This article appeared in the March 2011 issue Journal of Teacher Education (Volume 62, Number 2).

Abstract:

When the U.S. government released its 2007 census figures in January 2010, it reported that 12% of the U.S. population--more than 38 million people were foreign born. First-generation people were now one out of every eight persons in the nation, with 80% coming from Latin America and Asia. This near-record transformation, one in which diasporic populations now constitute a large and growing percentage of communities throughout the nation and an ever-growing proportion of children in our schools, documents one of the most profound reasons that we must think globally about education. This transformation is actually something of which we should be proud. The United States and a number of other nations are engaged in a vast experiment that has rarely been attempted before. Can we build a nation and a culture from resources and people from all over the world? The impacts of these global population flows on education and on teacher education are visible all around us.

Funds of Knowledge: An Investigation of Coherence Within the Literature

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

Two decades ago academics based at the University of Arizona brought the anthropological concept of Funds of Knowledge into the educational realm, providing a new conceptual framework to counter deficit theorizing of Latino students and their families. The growing body of literature evidences the belief and hope of academics in the potential of Funds of Knowledge to advance social justice and facilitate long-awaited breakthroughs in multicultural education practice. This paper provides an overview and analysis of Funds of Knowledge literature, addressing two key questions: What is the current scope of settings for Funds of Knowledge research? What do writers mean when they talk about Funds of Knowledge? Findings of differences in definitions indicate their contested nature. The review recommends clear articulation by researchers of the definition employed. Key questions arising from studies are presented and implications for multicultural education practice and teacher education are discussed.

Youth Violence and Positive Psychology: Research Potential Through Integration

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Canadian Psychology = Psychologie canadienne (Volume 52, Number 2).

Abstract:

Positive psychologists can study the relation between some of the discipline's core dimensions and aversive outcomes, including youth violence. Dimensions such as gratitude, forgiveness, sense of meaning, altruism (or at least apparent altruism), prudence, and humility have received attention within positive psychology, and evidence is reviewed suggesting that these may also deserve empirical attention in terms of their relation to youth violence and even their potential to reduce youth violence.

Who Will Help Prevent Sexual Violence: Creating an Ecological Model of Bystander Intervention

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of Psychology of Violence (Volume 1, Number 3).

Abstract:

Given the prevalence of sexual and relationship violence in communities, innovations in prevention are sought. One promising line of inquiry directs efforts not at victims or perpetrators but at community members who are potential witnesses to high-risk events along the continuum of violence or who may need to support victims after an assault. To date, the main organizing framework for understanding bystander behavior is the work of Latane and Darley (1970), who described a series of stages that lead to an individual's decision to intervene or not when someone needs help. Yet this model focuses mainly on factors within the individual or his or her immediate context. In the current review, I use ecological models by Bronfenbrenner (1977, 2005) and Kelly (2006) to expand our view of key factors that help promote and may serve as barriers to helpful bystander intervention. For example, ecological theories suggest important community-level variables, such as campus size or cultural values, that may influence the degree of helping and may, in some instances, be leverage points for creating change.

Monday August 1st is a Civic Holiday

The Education Library will be closed on Monday August 1st to celebrate the Civic Holiday.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

ProQuest Platform Change Coming ~ Friday July 29

On FRIDAY July 29th Western Libraries will be migrating to a new platform for ProQuest databases - including CBCA Education, ERIC, Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Education Journals, and PsycINFO. Any existing links to databases on the old platform will be redirected to the new platform following the migration, so that any links (such as those in WebCT, for example) will continue to work after July 29th.

Transition to Formal Schooling: Do Transition Practices Matter for Academic Performance?

This journal article appeared in the July 2011 issue of the Early Childhood Research Quarterly (Volume 26, Number 3).

Abstract:

This study examined whether the transition practices implemented in preschool-elementary school pairs contribute to children's academic development during the first year of elementary school. Participants were 398 children who moved from 36 preschools to 22 elementary schools in two Finnish towns. Children were tested in respect to their reading, writing, and math skills in the preschool spring and in the grade 1 spring. The most common practices reported by preschool teachers were discussions about the school entrants and familiarizing preschool children with the school environment and the new teacher. Multilevel latent growth modeling showed that the more the preschool teachers and elementary-school teachers implemented various supportive activities during the preschool year, the faster the children's skills developed from preschool to grade 1 spring. Co-operation over curricula and passing on written information about children between the preschool and the elementary school were the best predictors of the children's skills, although they were the least commonly used practices. The need to restructure the transition to elementary school and the use of multiprofessional resources are discussed.

Supporting Adolescent Learning and Development Using Applied Learning Pedagogies in a Regional Secondary School: An Evaluation of a Pilot Program

This journal article appeared in the November/December 2011 issue of The High School Journal (Volume 94, Number 1).

Abstract:

Pedagogies to develop autonomy and social responsibility in early adolescent learners persist as an ongoing agenda for schools. This paper reports on one Australian regional secondary college's pilot program to improve learner engagement in one year 8 class using applied learning principles across the curriculum. In late 2006, participating students in this applied learning initiative were interviewed in small groups, their parents surveyed, and their home group teacher interviewed. Overwhelmingly, student perspectives strongly endorsed the pilot program and were consistent with parent and teacher observations of these same students' feelings toward engagement within the program. This article details adolescents' self-reported significant learning, locating them within a wider discourse of secondary school curriculum and current knowledge about early adolescent learners. This article also provides particular reference to the applied learning principles around which the pilot program was conceived and framed.

Concerns with Men's Academic Motivation in Higher Education: An Exploratory Investigation of the Role of Masculinity

This journal article appears in the Winter 2011 issue of the Journal of Men's Studies (Volume 19, Number 1).

Abstract:

In the last twenty years, research has indicated that men as a social group are experiencing disproportionate difficulties in higher education. Typically, these problems have been addressed by investigating men as a homogenous sex, rather than employing gender awareness approaches that try to understand how the meaning of masculinity impacts motivation in higher education. This study was specifically interested in the relationship between conformity to masculine norms and academic motivation. Using exploratory canonical correlation analysis, two significant functions were revealed. The first, demonstrated that as conformity to masculine norms predictor variables: primacy of work decreases and playboy and violence increase, three types of intrinsic motivation decrease. The second function indicated that as conformity to masculine norms predictor variables emotional control, disdain for homosexuality, self-reliance, and winning decrease, two intrinsic motivation scores increase. Suggestions are given for further research in this area.

Interteaching: Bringing Behavioral Education into the 21st Century

This journal article appears in the Winter 2011 issue of The Psychological Record (Volume 61, Number 1).

Abstract:

In recent years, educators have lamented the current state of the American education system, citing a number of possible reasons for its purported downfall. One potential contributor to this negative state of affairs is the continued use of ineffective teaching methods. Interteaching, a new teaching method that has its roots in behavior analysis, offers an effective and user-friendly alternative to traditional approaches to classroom instruction. In this article, we describe interteaching. We also discuss a number of studies that have examined the efficacy of interteaching relative to more common teaching methods. Finally, we provide recommendations for researchers wishing to study this promising behavior-analytic teaching method.

Unmentionable Others: Representing Participation Frameworks in School Science

This journal article appears in the Winter 2011 issue of Anthropological Quarterly (Volume 84, Number 1)

Abstract:

In the current US educational world -- obsessed with accountability, measurement and testing -- allocating responsibility for intellectual activity in school science can be problematic. While science education promotes "hands-on" learning and "lab work" that typically occur in a group context, many curriculum units also require students to represent their experiences as solitary, individual, and private. The data for this paper are drawn from a video ethnography of diverse middle school students experiencing a curriculum unit on Motion and Force. The analysis shows that since the curriculum unit "addresses" the students as individuals but requires them to act in groups, they must learn to systematically erase the role of the group at strategic moments required by the curriculum. The reasons for this situation are linked not only to federal policies, but widespread theories of learning in the field of education.

ProQuest Platform Change Coming ~ July 29

On FRIDAY July 29th Western Libraries will be migrating to a new platform for ProQuest databases - including CBCA Education, ERIC, Dissertations & Theses, ProQuest Education Journals, and PsycINFO.

July 19, 2011

The Librarian is reading...

Amy Buckland's entry on "In Forming Thoughts" titled "The Talk I Meant to Give"

In this post, Amy talks about librarians as revolutionaries and thought-leaders: "True thought leaders, true revolutionaries, are willing to overthrow the system, or join it, if that's what works best for their community."


About the author in her own words:

i am the eScholarship, ePublishing & digitization coordinator at McGill University Library. this means i play around in our institutional repository, manage our digitization projects, work on ePublishing intiatives, and try to convince faculty to give me their data.

July 18, 2011

A Formative Study of an E-book Instructional Model in Early Literacy

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Creative Education (volume 2, Number 1).

Abstract:

E-books will likely be a part of future early childhood classrooms, and in light of the thin evidence based on their role in curriculum and instruction, this is formative study to investigate what e-book pedagogy for early literacy might look like in the early childhood classroom (Reigeluth & Frick, 1999). At this early stage of prototype creation, an e-book instructional model that was purposefully underspecified to allow a wide-angle view of what it takes and what happens when e-book technology is inserted into the pre-school classroom is conceptualized. Salient indicators of each component were identified, organized at different levels of abstraction, and assigned ratings to yield an assessment of design strengths and weaknesses as a basis for further model development. In brief, the design analysis revealed the need for better quality e-books; more precise design specifications for an e-book nook in the classroom setting; more explicit guidance for child engagement during e-book reading sessions; and stronger teacher training on "how to" use instructional procedures and skills in shared e-book reading.

Teachers' Use of Digital Technology in Secondary Music Education: Illustrations of Changing Classrooms

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of the British Journal of Music Education (Volume 28, Number 2).

Abstract:

The music industry in the 21st century uses digital technology in a wide range of applications including performance, composition and in recording and publishing. Much of this digital technology is freely available via downloads from the internet, as part of software included with computers when they are purchased and via applications that are available for some mobile phones. Such technology is transforming music and the way people approach many traditional music activities. This paper is about transformative practices that are underway in some secondary school music classrooms. Practices are being shaped by the culture of the schools and the students that they recruit. We describe the perceptions and practices of nine music teachers in four New Zealand secondary schools with regard to digital technology and how they are changing their work in their classroom. Data collection techniques include interviews, observation and a questionnaire. The data were subjected to two stages of thematic analysis. Grounded analysis was used to allow the teachers' voices emerge. This was then followed by the application of five themes identified in the literature on pedagogic change prompted by teachers' adoption of digital technologies.

Long-Term Study of Safe Internet Use of Young Children

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

The Internet is an evolving medium that continuously presents new functionalities. Accordingly, also children's Internet usage changes continuously. This requires being vigilant about related Internet risk behavior and safe Internet use. The present article presents a structured overview of Internet risks and summarizes approaches to foster safe Internet behavior. Based on a long-term cross-sectional study, Internet usage of young children has been researched. The focus is on contact risks and content risks. Based on the analysis of survey data from 10000 children, trends in their (un)safe Internet usage are studied in the years 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009. An Unsafe Internet Usage Index (UIUI) is calculated. The average results point at a rather low level of unsafe Internet usage. But these average results hide between-subject differences and a number of children clearly reflect risky unsafe Internet usage. Also, no consistent reduction in unsafe Internet behavior is being observed over the years. Parental and teacher control hardly increase, and hardly seem to impact the level of unsafe Internet behavior. Considering a number of limitations of the present study, directions for future research are discussed.

E-books as Support for Emergent Writing With and Without Adult Assistance

This journal article appears in the September 2011 issue of Education and Information Technologies (Volume 16, Number 3).

Abstract:

The question posed in the current study is whether software alone is a sufficient tool for supporting young children's emergent writing. We researched the effect of reading an electronic book (e-book) on kindergarten children's emergent word writing with and without adult support. Ninety-six 5 to 6 years old children from low socioeconomic status (SES) families were randomly assigned to one of three groups (32 children each): (1) independently reading the e-book; (2) reading the e-book with adult support; (3) receiving the regular kindergarten program (control). Each intervention group received four e-book reading sessions. The children's emergent literacy was assessed before and after the intervention and included letter-name recognition, phonological awareness and emergent word writing. Reading the e-book with adult assistance supported the children's phonological awareness and emergent word writing more significantly than reading the e-book without support and more than the control group. Reading the e-book without adult support did not differ from the control group. Furthermore, the children's initial emergent literacy level and reading the ebook with adult assistance contributed the most to the children's emergent word writing. Educational implications are discussed.

New Book ~ Meaningful Learning with Technology (Fourth Edition)

This information is from the publisher's website:

Grounded in constructivist teachings, this popular text demonstrates how teachers can use technology to engage and support meaningful learning of their students.


Organized around learning processes such as inquiring, experimenting, writing, modeling, community building, communicating, designing, visualizing, and assessing, Meaningful Learning with Technology, Fourth Edition, demonstrates for the reader how learners can use different technologies for meaningful learning. Numerous examples from teachers in K-12 classrooms, give readers a clear understanding of how technology can be used with different types of students, including expanded coverage of effective technology use with young learners.

All chapters now present learning objectives as well as ISTE NETS for Students and 21st Century Skills that may be met through the learning activities described. The text is further strengthened by the inclusion of practical application with technologies that many teachers currently use; discussion of widely available web-based tools for learning and collaboration; and the addition of Assessing Meaningful Teaching and Learning rubrics which give readers a tool for reflecting on their practice. Each chapter extends learning by culminating with questions and issues for readers to think about.

New Book ~ Literacy 2.0: Reading and Writing in 21st Century Classrooms

This information is from the publisher's website:

Literacy 2.0 is where traditional literacy and technological literacy meet. Students in the 21st century still need to develop the reading and writing skills that were the aim of literacy 1.0 instruction, but they must go beyond those skills and learn how to use technology for communicating and collaborating in new ways.

Benefit from the authors' extensive experience in secondary literacy 2.0 classrooms. Discover precisely what students need to be taught to become proficient in the literacies associated with information and communication technologies. The book begins with a general instructional model and then delivers the specific teaching skills related to acquiring, producing, and sharing information. These skills include using search engines efficiently, evaluating information found on websites, avoiding plagiarism, communicating with a wide audience, working collaboratively, and creating multimedia products. In a highly accessible style, the authors detail how to use the many tools and technologies they discuss and give numerous practical suggestions for classroom applications.

Benefits:

* Defines literacy 2.0 as the new version of literacy 1.0, not as a replacement
* Identifies essential ICT (information and communications technology) skills
* Emphasizes the distinction between functions and tools
* Matches tools to their functions
* Explains how to use all the tools discussed
* Identifies numerous web-based resources
* Gives numerous examples of classroom activities, assignments, and collaborative projects that require the use of technology
* Includes examples of student work that reflect literacy 2.0 skills
* Provides "Chapter Tweets," brief statements of the main ideas introduced in each chapter

New Book ~ Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator

This information is from the publisher's website:

This book, a resource for educators, uses the theme of media literacy as a lens through which to view and discuss social networking and Web 2.0 environments. There is ongoing and positive research on the participatory culture created by youth who are heavily involved in the new digital technologies, yet schools tend to avoid these mediums for fear of the unknown. Can students learn within this context? This book posits that indeed they can, using media literacy as a way to provide a framework for these mediated environments. The book serves as a forum for educators and those interested in the field of media literacy, digital, and social technologies, who seek to bridge curriculum connections as well as understand the online culture of students.

ProQuest Platform Change Coming ~ July 29

On July 29th Western Libraries will be migrating to a new platform for ProQuest databases. You can preview the new ProQuest platform HERE.

New Book ~ Education in the Creative Economy: Knowledge and Learning in the Age of Innovation

This information is from the publisher's website:

Education in the Creative Economy explores the need for new forms of learning and education that are most conducive to supporting student development in a creative society. Just as the assembly line shifted the key factor of production from labor to capital, digital networks are now shifting the key factor of production from capital to innovation. Beyond conventional discussions on the knowledge economy, many scholars now suggest that digital technologies are fomenting a shift in advanced economies from mass production to cultural innovation. This edited volume, which includes contributions from renowned scholars like Richard Florida, Charles Landry, and John Howkins, is a key resource for policymakers, researchers, teachers and journalists to assist them to better understand the contours of the creative economy and consider effective strategies for linking education to creative practice. In addition to arguments for investing in the knowledge economy through STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and math), this collection explores the growing importance of art, design and digital media as vehicles for creativity and innovation.

New Book ~ Handbook of Reading Interventions

This information is from the publisher's website:

Comprehensive, authoritative, and designed for practical utility, this handbook presents evidence-based approaches for helping struggling readers and those at risk for literacy difficulties or delays. Leading experts explain how current research on all aspects of literacy translates into innovative classroom practices. Chapters include clear descriptions of effective interventions for word recognition, spelling, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing, complete with concrete examples and teaching scripts. Coverage also encompasses preschool literacy instruction and interventions for older readers, English language learners, and students with learning disabilities, as well as peer-mediated and tutoring approaches.

New Book ~ Homelessness Comes to School

This information is from the publisher's website:

The seminal work on homeless students and our responsibility to educate them.


School-aged children in homeless families and independent homeless youth represent the fastest-growing population of homeless individuals in the United States. This volume brings the issue to light with substantial and far-reaching research that describes the plight of these children, the legal framework surrounding the issue, and educators' roles in teaching homeless children. Homelessness Comes to School also outlines effective intervention programs and provides specific guidelines for teaching homeless students. Topics covered include:

* A history of homelessness, including its demographic patterns, causes, and impact on society
* The various programs schools have implemented to address homeless children's needs
* How schools, parents, and external community agencies can work together to educate homeless students

Evaluating the scope of the problem and developing interventions for these students at risk must be a priority for service providers and policy makers. This resource will give all involved parties a well-grounded understanding of homelessness and guidelines for working together toward a solution.

The Librarian is reading...

"Writing to Change the World" by Mary Pipher

Summary:

In these tumultuous times, don't we all want to be heard? Who doesn't want to transform the world? And who doesn't harbor a secret ambition to write?


Writing to Change the World is intended to help people who have a message they're passionate about to convey it clearly through writing. Inspired by a course of the same name that Mary Pipher taught at the University of Nebraska's National Summer Writers' Conference, this book encapsulates her years of experience as a writer and therapist, as well as her extensive knowledge of the craft of writing.

Writing to Change the World combines practical instruction with inspirational commentary, featuring personal anecdotes, memorable quotations from other writers, practical how-to advice, and stories about writers who have transformed society through their work. In addition to laying out the various steps of the writing process - brainstorming, writing, revising, and publishing - Pipher gives advice about specific forms of advocacy writing: op-ed pieces, letters, essays, speeches, and blogs. She inspires readers to take up their pens, while reflecting on the writer's responsibilities as a moral agent. This is a book that really can make a difference!

About the Author:

Mary Pipher, Ph.D., is the author of the number-one New York Times-bestselling Reviving Ophelia, as well as The Shelter of Each Other, Another Country, The Middle of Everywhere, and Letters to a Young Therapist. She was a Rockefeller Scholar, and received the American Psychological Association's Presidential Citation. She is a visiting professor in both the English and Psychology departments at the University of Nebraska.

July 15, 2011

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

After you log in to RefWorks, look in the upper right corner of the page for the "RefWorks 2.0" link. Click on it, and you will immediately be switched to RefWorks 2.0. All of your references, folders, and preferences will be automatically converted: you won't lose anything.

The RefWorks Classic interface is being discontinued, and all users will be converted to RefWorks 2.0 in early August.

Counselling Psychology in a Canadian Context: Definition and Description

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Canadian Psychology/Psychologie Canadienne (Volume 52, Number 2).

Abstract:

Counselling psychology, established in 1987 as a specialization within Canadian professional psychology, has developed a distinctive identity and specific underlying approach to training and practice. To date, the field in Canada has evolved without benefit of a formal definition of the specialization. Over three years, a task force charged with development of a definition of Canadian counselling psychology engaged in a broad survey of extant literature and member consultation, and proposed a definition that was adopted by the Board of Directors of the Canadian Psychological Association in June 2009. The present work discusses the process that informed development of the definition, provides a description of the characteristics of a Canadian counselling psychology approach to research and practice, and enumerates challenges to the continued development of the specialization.

Predictive Validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth in Secondary Educational Settings

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Psychological Assessment (Volume 23, Number 2).

Abstract:

Current developments in violence risk assessment warrant consideration for use within educational settings. Using a structured professional judgment (SPJ) model, the present study investigated the predictive validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence in Youth (SAVRY) within educational settings. The predictive accuracy of the SAVRY scales was assessed using a retrospective file review to gather data on 87 adolescents ranging in age from 12 to 18 years. Receiver-operating characteristic analyses were used to gauge the predictive accuracy. With an area under the curve of .72 (p = .001), the accuracy of the SAVRY total score in correctly identifying violent youth exceeds the accuracy of identifications based on chance predictions in this sample. Logistic regression analyses assessed the relative contribution of the SAVRY subscales, whereas the omnibus equation using all subscale scores correctly classified 82% of those adolescents who were nonviolent and 45% of those adolescents who were violent. These results build on previous research and provide support for the use of the SAVRY in educational settings for identification as well as directing intervention efforts. Practical implications and areas for future research are also discussed.

Teachers' Reported Use of Instructional and Behavior Management Practices for Students with Behavior Problems: Relationship to Role and Level of Training in ADHD

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Child & Youth Care Forum (Volume 40, Number 3).

Abstract:

The present study examined general and special education teachers' self-reported level of in-service training in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a common childhood mental health disorder, and the relationship between teachers' level of training in ADHD and their reported use of a range of recommended instructional and behavior management approaches for students exhibiting behavior problems. The analyses revealed that the majority of general education teachers (76%), and almost half (41%) of the special education teachers, reported having no or brief in-service training in ADHD. General education teachers with moderate to extensive in-service training in ADHD reported significantly greater use of the recommended approaches (as indicated by their scores on the Instructional and Behavior Management Survey) than general educators with little or no training in ADHD. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Aboriginal education program offers content "about our people"

This article appears in the July 14th 2011 issue of the Western News. The article is written by Heather Travis.


"Having a community-based program is really important," says Rebecca Coulter, professor in the Faculty of Education. "The program is more intense because they not only learn about provincial issues and policies, they are also addressing First Nations content and content with deep personal meaning."


Coulter points to the success of graduates from the first cohort, many currently working in leadership positions, as evidence of its success. The program also presents a learning opportunity for Coulter, who says she has "so much to gain from the experience."

Among the changes to the program has been the addition of Faculty of Education professor Brent Debassige, who shares his own experiences in the classroom discussions, as well as brings relationships and expertise in aboriginal education.

Holding the courses in Kettle & Stony Point has been transformative and has allowed students to gain ownership of the learning material, Debassige says.

"Being a Ojibwa person and having similar experiences to some of the students in the class and bringing that to bear on the content and different exchanges we have in the classrooms are different, interesting things I bring," he says.

July 13, 2011

New Book ~ Slam School: Learning Through Conflict in the Hip-Hop and Spoken Word Classroom

This information is from the publisher's website:

Mainstream rap's seductive blend of sexuality, violence, and bravado hardly seems the stuff of school curricula. And chances are good that the progressive and revolutionary "underground" hip-hop of artists such as The Roots or Mos Def is not on the playlists of most high-school students. That said, hip-hop culture remains a profound influence on contemporary urban youth culture and a growing number of teachers are developing strategies for integrating it into their classrooms. While most of these are hip-hop generation members who cannot imagine leaving the culture at the door, this book tells the story of a white teacher who stepped outside his comfort zone into the rich and messy realm of student popular investments and abilities.


Slam School takes the reader into the heart of a poetry course in an urban high school to make the case for critical hip-hop pedagogies. Pairing rap music with its less controversial cousins, spoken word and slam poetry, this course honored and extended student interests. It also confronted the barriers of race, class, gender, and generation that can separate white teachers from classrooms of predominantly black and Latino students and students from each other.

Bronwen Low builds a surprising argument: the very reasons teachers might resist the introduction of hip-hop into the planned curriculum are what make hip-hop so pedagogically vital. Class discussions on topics such as what one can and cannot say in the school auditorium or who can use the N-word raised pressing and difficult questions about language, culture and identity. As she reveals, an innovative, student-centered pedagogy based on spoken word curriculum that is willing to tolerate conflict, as well as ambivalence, has the potential to air tensions and lead to new insights and understandings for both teachers and students.

New Book ~ Boys and Their Schooling: The Experience of Becoming Someone Else

This information is from the publisher's website:

This book presents an ethnographic study of the experiences of teenage boys in an Australian high school. It follows a group of thirteen- to fifteen-year-olds over a period of more than two years, and seeks to understand why so many boys say they hate school yet enjoy being with one another in their daily confrontations with the formal school. The study acknowledges the ongoing significance of the "boys' debate" to policy-makers and the media, and therefore to teachers and parents, but moves it on from issues of gender construction and the panic about achievement to the broader question of what it is to experience being schooled as a boy in the new liberal educational environment.

New Book ~ Homophobic Bullying: Research and Theoretical Perspectives

This information is from the publisher's website:

Summary:

Homophobic Bullying: Research and Theoretical Perspectives provides a review of key studies that have shaped the way we view homophobia in educational contexts. Using theories and ideas drawn from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and ethology, this book aims to conceptualize homophobic bullying as a construct of dominant institutions and groups that reinforce beliefs about the abnormality of homosexuality.

Rivers demonstrates how bullying is a complex social process in which perpetrators are supported by active confederates, passive bystanders, and indifferent onlookers. Rivers also discusses new forms of bullying, such as cyberbullying, and explores the theoretical and social-psychological implications of bullying using new technologies. He discusses the challenges faced by teachers in eroding negative, implicit attitudes in the face of socially acceptable, explicit expressions of these attitudes.

Included here are primary data drawn from various studies that Rivers has conducted over the past two decades, along with discussions of key studies conducted by other researchers in the US, Canada, UK, Australia, and Scandinavia.

Rivers explores the psycho-social correlates and potential long-term effects of bullying and homophobia, using various clinical studies as a guide to understanding the potential harm that results from school-based aggression.

An important feature of this book is the integration of primary quantitative and qualitative data, case studies from parents, suggested lesson plans, and reports of recent legal action that highlight the dangers for students and teachers of not combating this particular form of school violence.

Finally, the book looks to the future and the changing face of schools, the gradual erosion of homophobia as an accepted 'norm' within society, and the institutions that train future generations.

Ultimately, this book reflects the research journey of its author and the development of a substantive world-wide body of evidence charting the challenges faced by those who are or are simply labeled lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

New Book ~ On Narrative Inquiry: Approaches to Language and Literacy Research

Can stories about students and classrooms be the basis for meaningful research?


In this book, the authors describe and tell illustrative stories about the potential and limits of narrative for the purpose of inquiry in English education. They argue that narrative inquiry is uniquely suited to the questions educators are asking in the field today.

This book introduces us to narrative scholars who engage us in philosophical and methodological discussions and it describes how narrative works in relation to the telling of a story or stories. It also provides examples of narrative inquiry to inspire you to create academic work that is both imaginative and responsible.

On Narrative Inquiry will be useful to graduate students and novice and experienced researchers who want to learn more about the range of methodological considerations for compiling and presenting narrative accounts.

Book Features:

* An overview of the use of narrative research in language and literacy education.
* Guidance for theorizing, defining, conducting, and crafting narrative inquiry.
* Examples of the various forms narrative inquiry might take.
* A final chapter that offers a provocation about future considerations for narrative inquiry. (It's a literary comic!)

New Book ~ Researching Young Children's Perspectives: Debating the Ethics and Dilemmas of Educational Research With Children

This information is from the publisher's website:

What ethical dilemmas face researchers who work with young children?


Researching Young Children's Perspectives critically examines the challenges and complexities of rights based, participatory research with children. Rather than approaching these dilemmas as problematic issues, this book positions them as important topics for discussion and reflection.

Drawing from their own rich experiences as research collaborators with young children in internationally diverse settings, the authors consider the ethical, methodological and theoretical frameworks that guide best-practice in research with young children. Each chapter poses points for consideration that will inform and challenge both the novice and experienced researcher, such as:

* How 'participatory' can research be with infants under eighteen months?

* When should listening through observation stand alone?

* What is the distinction between methodologies and methods?

* How can all young children be assured of a voice in research?

The authors also present seven separate case studies which demonstrate exemplary research with young children. Each study is accompanied by insightful commentary from the authors, who highlight the issues or difficulties faced and propose potential solutions.

And, I Quote....

"For the first time in the history of education, the teacher, student, and content do not need to be in the same place or even be together at the same time. If time and distance are dead and if complete integrative technology allows us to have a 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional experience, what will be left of our current education system."

McCain, T., & Jukes, I. (2001). Windows on the Future: Education in the Age of Technology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

New Book ~ Natural Learning for a Connected World: Education, Technology, and The Human Brain

Why do video games fascinate kids so much that they will spend hours pursuing a difficult skill? Why don't they apply this kind of intensity to their schoolwork? This book describes an approach for integrating technology into teaching that wil help all students (all grade levels and all cultural and ethnic groups) learn with greater depth and ease.

NetLibrary becomes EBSCOHost

This past year NetLibrary, an e-book service used by Western Libraries, was purchased by EBSCO.

As a result the NetLibrary interface will be changed to EBSCOHost as of July 18.

Users with NetLibrary accounts should note that information contained in your account will need to be downloaded locally before July 16 as this information will not be transferred to the new interface.

July 12, 2011

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is updated regularly - have a look!

New Book ~ Re-Engaging Disconnected Youth: Transformative Learning Through Restorative and Social Justice Education

This information is from the publisher's website:

As many young adults continue to disengage with learning each day, teachers and administrators struggle to find programming that re-engages secondary students with their schooling and communities. This book profiles one program that succeeds in doing so, and should serve as a model for others. In a Midwestern alternative school, three teachers built a curriculum around hands-on learning, restorative justice Talking Circles, and multicultural education, in the hopes that it would re-engage and inspire youth. Drawing on adult transformative learning theory, this book is an in-depth, qualitative study of the ways the program transformed adult and youth perceptions of trust, connections, schooling, and human rights. This book breaks down stereotypes about youth labeled «at-risk» and provides evidence that it is never too late to become passionate about learning.


Amy Vatne Bintliff is a teacher and researcher who has taught language arts and reading in traditional and alternative programs in Minnesota and Wisconsin. She is a trained restorative justice Circle Keeper and has developed a wide array of programming for students who struggle with school. A passionate advocate of human rights and multicultural education, she believes strongly in listening to the voices of adolescents.

New Book ~ Education Reconfigured: Culture, Encounter, and Change

This information is from the publisher's website:

As philosophers throughout the ages have asked: What is justice? What is truth? What is art? What is law? In Education Reconfigured, the internationally acclaimed philosopher of education, Jane Roland Martin, now asks: What is education? In answer, she puts forward a unified theory that casts education in a brand new light. Martin's "theory of education as encounter" places culture alongside the individual at the heart of the educational process, thus responding to the call John Dewey made over a century ago for an enlarged outlook on education. Look through her theory's lens and you can see that education takes place not only in school but at home, on the street, in the mall--everywhere and all the time. Look through that lens and you can see that education does not always spell improvement; rather, it can be for the better or the worse. Indeed, you can see that education is inevitably a maker and shaper of both individuals and cultures.

Above all, Martin's new educational paradigm reveals that education is too important to be left solely to the professionals; that it is one of the great forces in human society and, as such, deserves the attention and demands the vigilance of every thoughtful person.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

After you log in to RefWorks, look in the upper right corner of the page for the "RefWorks 2.0" link. Click on it, and you will immediately be switched to RefWorks 2.0. All of your references, folders, and preferences will be automatically converted: you won't lose anything.

The RefWorks Classic interface is being discontinued, and all users will be converted to RefWorks 2.0 in early August.

Teacher-Education Students' Views About Knowledge Building Theory and Practice

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of Instructional Science (Volume 39, Number 4).

Abstract :

This study investigated the effects of engaging students to collectively learn and work with knowledge in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment called Knowledge Forum on their views about knowledge building theory and practice. Participants were 24 teacher-education students who took a required course titled "Integrating Theory and Practice in Teaching." Data mainly came from (1) student discourse recorded in a Knowledge Forum database, (2) a survey that examined students' views about knowledge building, and (3) interviews with regard to students' perceived barriers to implementing knowledge building theory in teaching. Findings suggest that with sustained discourse to construct their collective understanding of the relationships between theory and practice in teaching for a semester, the participants were able to attain more informed and practical views about knowledge building theory. In addition, students' perceived barriers to implementing knowledge building in teaching were identified and strategies to help overcome these barriers discussed.

Sites We Like ~ Qualitative Research Café: Food for Thought on Interpretive and Critical Research Approaches

Sandra Mathison, a Professor of Education at the University of British Columbia, is the proprietor of the Qualitative Research Café. Since 2007 she has regularly posted on topics ranging from "big abstract ideas" such as epistemology and philosophy to course syllabi and researcher roles as well as providing links to sites on data analysis, ethics, image based research, methods, and research publications.

Service Learning and the Preparation of English Teachers

I am still reading/thinking/learning about "third spaces" and I came across this journal article that appears in the July 2011 issue of English Education (Volume 43, Number 4).

Abstract:

In this article, service learning is explored as a pedagogical third space from which preservice teachers learn to teach the New English education. We argue that such a space has the potential to foster preservice English teachers' understanding of their role and identity as future teachers and how this identity is always relative to the students they teach. Drawing from a study of 19 preservice English teachers' experiences with service learning, we discuss three themes relevant to service learning and the preparation of English teachers: (1) service learning as a pedagogical third space for English teachers, (2) service learning as fostering the disruption of a teaching mythology, and (3) service learning as promoting a recognition of the New English education. Further, we propose that service learning can encourage prospective English teachers to complicate notions of teacher/student, official/unofficial language, singular authority/pluralistic power, and server/served.

eBook ~ Digital Games and Learning

The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and challenges for us. How can gaming and simulation technologies be used to engage learners? How can games be used to motivate, deepen and accelerate learning? How can they be used to greatest effect in learning and teaching? In this book the contributors explore these and many other questions that are vital to our understanding of the paradigm shift from conventional learning environments to learning in games and simulations.

eBook ~ Rituals and Student Identity in Education: Ritual Critique for a New Pedagogy

A contemporary look at both the rituals fostered in our education system that reproduce inequalities between students and how we can change these techniques to promote equity in and outside the classroom.


The current crisis in American schools has been more than fifty years in the making. The present assumption that "accountability" equals "testing" and that "education" equals "measurable objectives" has occurred in a brief lifetime. How has this happened? Quantz attempts to answer this question in this fascinating study. This book is not a history of the movement, but an exploration of how the nonrational aspects of schooling, especially ritual(s), have been harnessed to construct a commonsense which serves the interests of transnational corporations, leaving those educators committed to democracy to develop a new pedagogy that rejects the technical solutions that present reforms demand.

eBook ~ Researching Education: Data, Methods and Theory in Educational Enquiry (Second Edition)

Researching Education looks at the theory and practice of researching education and examines the philosophical, historical, political and social contexts of research and the implications of these for the collection and analysis of data.


Scott and Usher argue that while power is ever present in the construction of research texts, this is inevitable as research imposes a closure of the world through representations and thus is always and inevitably involved with and implicated in the operation of power.

The authors provide a theoretical framework against previously compiled research can be judged to stimulates further study and consider key questions:


What is legitimate knowledge?
What is the relationship between the collection and analysis of data?
How does the researcher's presence in the field impact on their data?


This new edition has been completely revised to reflect new insights into education research and educational research methodology and the impact of recent political initiatives.

Researching Education is invaluable reading for educational and social researchers as well as postgraduate and doctoral students.

eBooks ~ Lopsided Schools: Case Method Briefings

Lopsided Schools introduces readers to the case method. It is intended for school administrators, instructors, guidance counselors, teacher trainers, school board members, parents, and the general public. It helps them use the case method to examine the scholastic challenges that critics posed from World War I to the present.

eBook ~ Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Clashes and Confrontations

The authors in this edited volume reflect on their experiences with culturally relevant pedagogy - as students, as teachers, as researchers- and how these experiences were often at odds with their backgrounds and/or expectations. Each of the authors speaks to the complexity and difficulty in attempting to address students' cultures, create learning experiences with relevance to their lives and experiences, and enact pedagogies that promote academic achievement while honoring students. At the same time, every author shows the clashes and confrontations that can arise between and among students, teachers, parents, administrators, and educational policies.

eBook ~ Finding, Preparing, and Supporting School Leaders: Critical Issues, Useful Solutions

With dwindling funds and resources, tougher state and federal standards, and fatigue from more regulations and testing, many school administrators are giving up _or 'crashing' and leaving their posts. This book examines the process of preparing, encouraging, and retaining quality leaders at the school and district levels. Beginning with a chapter outlining six steps of critical organizational supports, subsequent chapters address factors in preparing administrator candidates effectively; improving novice teacher retention through principal support and mentoring; utilizing more fully mid-career teachers who come to schools having worked outside of education; the role of isolation in new principals' sense of efficacy; research findings about assistant superintendents about job satisfaction, efficacy, and ambitions for promotion; and finally, contemporary leadership challenges existing at the superintendent level. Concluding with thoughts about administrator accountability, the various chapters offer contemporary views on the preparation, utilization, and retention of school administrators throughout the life cycle

eBook ~ Women and Educational Leadership

Women and Educational Leadership shows how the qualities that characterize women's approaches to leadership differ from traditional approaches?whether the traditional leader is a woman or a man. The authors reveal that women leaders are more collaborative by nature and demonstrate a commitment to social justice. They tend to bring an instructional focus to leadership, include spiritual dimensions in their work, and strive for balance between the personal and professional.

This important book offers a new model of leadership that shifts away from the traditional heroic notion of leadership to the collective account of leadership that focuses on leadership for a specific purpose--like social justice. The authors include illustrative examples of leaders who have brought diverse groups to work toward common ground. They also show how leadership is a way to facilitate and support the work of organizational members. The ideas and suggestions presented throughout the book can help the next generation fulfill the promise of a new tradition of leadership.

eBook ~ Change the World with Service Learning: How to Organize, Lead, and Assess Service Learning Projects

Change the World with Service Learning is clear, direct, easy to use, and designed for busy teachers who want to integrate service learning into their existing curriculum. This book guides teachers from all content areas and grade levels to create outstanding service-learning projects with students like no other book does. Change the World with Service Learning is a no-fluff, step-by-step, teacher-to-teacher description of how to create, plan, teach, and celebrate service-learning projects that meet and exceed local, district, and national curricular expectations.


A paper copy of this book is available at King's University College Library.

eBook ~ Academic Leadership Day By Day: Small Steps That Lead To Great Success

This book summary is from the publisher's website:

It can seem at times as though all of academic administration today is focused only on the need for continual change and the endless pursuit of "the big idea." But most academic leaders, from department chairs and program directors through university presidents and chancellors, are far too busy helping their institutions flourish for them to divert critical energy and resources to yet another untried theory or management principle. Academic Leadership Day by Day takes an entirely different approach to developing your proven academic leadership: It introduces one practical and field-tested idea each day for an entire academic year. Rather than requiring you to devote days or even weeks to administrative training (which may prove to be of little use in the end), this manual gives you no-nonsense suggestions that you can consider on even your busiest days. Experiment with the suggestions made each day, discover what works for you, and then build on your successes for the benefit of your institution and its programs. Significant improvements often result from small, gradual, and consistent efforts, and Academic Leadership Day by Day is your guide to becoming a more accomplished, confident academic leader a few minutes at a time.

July 11, 2011

New Book: Research as Praxis: Democratizing Education Epistemologies

This information is from the publisher's website:

Research as Praxis is an exposé of the philosophical, theoretical, and methodological principles and assumptions of Research as Praxis (RAP) as an alternative paradigm of education/social research to the resurgent exclusionary hegemony of the positivist epistemology.


The ultimate purpose of RAP projects is to serve the public interest, especially the well-being of students and educators. This is in contrast to projects that serve merely instrumental purposes, like trying to raise achievement test scores. Improvement of well-being can be achieved if research participants are able to participate democratically on an equal footing with researchers in deciding what to study, why, and how to do it, and how to use this knowledge to engage in collective action and dialogic understanding to solve problems and improve their situations.

By acknowledging participants' agency and valuing their knowledge and experiences, we increase the chances that research results and experiences will be highly relevant and responsive to participants' needs and growth, as well as to other communities and society at large.

The authors draw on the participatory research traditions, especially those experiences made available by researchers, activists, and public intellectuals from the so-called Third World - Latin America, India, Bangladesh, Africa, and the Maori indigenous people from New Zealand.

Inspired by those experiences, RAP inquirers blur the boundaries among research, education, and activism, and instead interplay them at all times. This book will be useful to researchers, educators, and graduate students in education, social sciences and services, and humanities.

New Book: Research for What? Making Engaged Scholarship Matter

This information is from the publisher's website:

Research on service-learning and community engagement has exploded over the past decade. It is a field now characterized by increasing methodological and theoretical sophistication, vast quantitative and qualitative studies, interdisciplinary research, myriad subjects, and the internationalization of scholarship.


The papers in this volume were selected from nearly 100 presentations made at the 2009 annual conference of the International Association for Research on Service Learning and Community Engagement held in Ottawa, Canada's national capital. The conference theme, Research for What? emphasized fundamental questions, namely: to what extent is rigorous research uncovering best practices in, and demonstrating the positive results of, service-learning on teaching, learning and building better communities? The papers examine such themes through lenses that include the application of theory to practice, K-12 and university-based service-learning, interdisciplinary initiatives, and international service-learning. The introduction provides an overview of the very recent, but remarkable, growth of service-learning in Canada, and the conclusion, written by the recipient of the Association's annual Distinguished Researcher Award, discusses major developments, and continuing challenges, in service-learning research.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

After you log in to RefWorks, look in the upper right corner of the page for the "RefWorks 2.0" link. Click on it, and you will immediately be switched to RefWorks 2.0. All of your references, folders, and preferences will be automatically converted: you won't lose anything.

The RefWorks Classic interface is being discontinued, and all users will be converted to RefWorks 2.0 in early August.

Sites We Like ~ Wright'sRoom

The author of this blog, Wright'sRoom has this to say:

My name is Shelley Wright. I am a high school educator in Moose Jaw, SK. I love learning more than anything else; this blog is part of that journey

The Librarian is reading...

"The Great Good Place: Cafés, Coffee Shops, Community Centers, Beauty Parlors, General Stores, Bars, Hangouts and How They Get You Through The Day" by Ray Oldenburg.


Summary:

The Great Good Place argues that "third places" - where people can gather, put aside the concerns of work and home, and hang out simply for the pleasures of good company and lively conversation - are the heart of a community's social vitality and the grassroots of democracy.

For as long as I can remember I have been drawn to "third places."

July 4, 2011

Getting Started: APA Style

The rules of APA Style, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On this site, you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

We recommend you spend some time with The Basics of APA Tutorial. This tutorial is designed for those who have no previous knowledge of APA Style. It shows users how to structure and format their work, recommends ways to reduce bias in language, identifies how to avoid charges of plagiarism, shows how to cite references in text, and provides selected reference examples.

June 30, 2011

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is updated regularly, and the content differs significantly from the content of this blog ~ have a look!

People We Know: Dr. Robert B. Macmillan

Our best wishes are extended to Dr. Robert B. Macmillan Associate Dean (Graduate Programs and Research) as he assumes a new position at the University of Manitoba.

Honouring Canada Day and Welcoming our Summer Session Students

The Education Library is closed to honour Canada Day on Friday July 1st.
We are also closed on Saturday July 2nd and Sunday July 3rd.


We welcome our CTE Additional Qualification (AQ) students and our summer graduate students on Monday July 4th.

June 29, 2011

Getting Started: Off-Campus Access

Do you need to use library resources from off-campus? Just sign in to the Off Campus Access/EZProxy service with your Western computer account unsername and password, and you can access the Western Libraries' online collection from any location.

Getting Started: Searching the Library Catalogue

Start Your Research by Searching our Library Catalogue!

Looking for a book by a specific author? Looking for a specific book title? Looking for resources on a specific topic? Looking for a specific journal title? Looking for any books at particular topic?

If you nodded "yes" to any of these questions, you want to begin your research by becoming familiar with our Library Catalogue.

We highly recommend that you click the CATALOGUE option at the top of the Western Libraries' website.

You can search the CATALOGUE by book title, journal title, author and keyword, and there are amazing limiting features also ~ give the online catalogue a try!

Getting Started: Program Guides

The Program Guides provide you with a starting place for finding information for your assignments and research.

You will see the Program Guides link on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website. It is listed under the heading Research Tools.

When you click on the Program Guides link you will get a list of all of Western programs with a link to library-created program guides to help you get started with your research in your particular program.

The Education Library provides you with three Program Guides:

* Bachelor and Diploma in Education
* Continuing Teacher Education
* Education Graduate Program


Have a look at the other Program Guides, especially those listed under Social Sciences.


NOTE: The Leadership in Aboriginal Education cohort may want to take a look at the First Nations Studies program guide listed under Social Sciences.


Getting Started: Education Databases

All of the databases available to Western students, staff and faculty members are listed on the Databases by Title list on the Western Libraries' website.

You must have a Western username and password to use these research databases, and you must use these to connect to the off-campus proxy server.

The Databases by Title list (found on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website) is an alphabetical list of all of the research databases that are can be search when looking for scholarly research information for your assignments, research and thesis work.

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Of course, since the field of education is so multi-disciplinary it is necessary to search other subject databases on the Databases by Title list (e.g., Dissertations and Theses or PsycINFO)

Getting Started: Databases by Title

It is easy to get started with searching the research databases to find scholarly journal articles.

Go to the Western Libraries' website.

If you are working off campus, you must first connect to the proxy server so please type in your Western user name and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website. Login HELP is available.

Click on the option "Databases by Title"

Select one of the databases you want to search from the alphabetized list.

For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian education research information), ERIC or Proquest Education Journals to get started on your research.

Helpful Hints for Searching the Research Databases:


Research databases are "keyword friendly" and they (usually) default to the keyword search option, so you can start typing in your search terms. You may want to take some time to reflect on the various keywords you could use, and create a list of these related terms.

Keywords and search terms can be combined in a variety of ways to refine your search to get the most relevant journal articles in the most efficient manner.

You can also search the databases by author's name and by journal title.

This makes searching for your particular research topic much more efficient, and allows for flexible searching for information about your research topic.

June 27, 2011

A Comparison of On-Campus and Distance Teacher Education Programs in Severe Disabilities

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Teacher Education and Special Education (Volume 34, Number 2).

Abstract:

Distance teacher education programs employing videoconferencing technology and other online teaching tools are increasingly being used to prepare teachers of students with disabilities in rural and remote communities. This evaluation study compared the effectiveness of a distance and an on-campus teacher education program for teachers of students with severe disabilities. Teacher candidates in the distance cohort received the same program of study as candidates in the on-campus program except that the coursework was delivered through videoconferencing technology instead of traditional, face-to-face instruction. Instructional activities for candidates in both cohorts were supported through online instructional tools (i.e., Web CT) and on-site field supervision from university clinical faculty members and cooperating professionals from the local school districts. A variety of measures were used to assess candidates' acquisition of content and their ability to apply the knowledge and skills acquired through the program of study. The results indicate that there were no significant differences between students in the distance and on-campus teacher education cohorts on the measures of learning. The implications of the findings for further research are discussed.

Challenges and Inspirations: Student Teachers' Experiences in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Teacher Education and Special Education (Volume 34, Number 2).

Abstract:

Preparing teachers to meet the needs of children with disabilities remains a complex challenge. General education teachers feel unprepared, and attrition and teacher shortages in special education remain high. Despite a trend toward inclusive education, many children continue to be educated in segregated settings. This study explores the potential challenges and learning opportunities that self-contained settings offer early childhood special education teachers in training. Five early childhood preservice students seeking dual certification reflected on their placements in self-contained early childhood special education classrooms. Through an analysis of their weekly student teaching journals, we explored students' experiences in segregated early childhood special education classrooms and implications for teacher education. Our findings revealed that including a self-contained setting as one of several field experiences encouraged future teachers to think flexibly about teaching children with special needs while enhancing their understanding of the principles behind the continuum of services.

Thesis: The Role of Resilience in Accounting for Residential Treatment Outcomes with Seriously Emotionally and Behaviourally Disordered Children and Youth

Author: Wendy Bernadette den Dunnen

Abstract:

Residential treatment is among the most costly forms of intervention for children with serious emotional and behavioural disorders. While come children and youth report significant improvement from residential care, a significant subgroup does not. One explanation for treatment responsiveness may be related to resilience. This study examined factors predictive of resilience in 170 children and youth who were admitted to residential treatment with complex mental health problems. Results indicated that lower internalizing and externalizing behaviour predicted behavioural resilience. Higher school participation/achievement and an absence of witnessing abuse predicted educational resilience. Family resilience was predicted by higher family functioning, younger children within the family, and poor behaviour within the community. These findings highlight the importance of strengthening individual, educational, and family factors in fostering resilience in children and youth with extreme mental health problems.


To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Canada Day

The Education Library is closed to honour Canada Day on Friday July 1st. We are also closed on Saturday July 2nd and Sunday July 3rd. We welcome our CTE Additional Qualification (AQ) students and our summer graduate students on Monday July 4th.

Thesis: An Examination of Body Dissatisfaction Among Women Over 40

Author: Jessica Lewis

Abstract:

The current study examined the influence of media, life transitions, and experience of internalization of societal messages and pressure to look thin on body dissatisfaction among older women. Three research questions were asked in this study: first, is there an association between the media and body dissatisfaction among older women?; second, is there a relationship bewtween recent life transitions and body dissatisfaction; and finally, what is the relationship between life transitions, media influence, and body dissatisfaction? Thirty-one women between the ages of 40 and 63 were surveyed using four measurements, namely the Figure Rating Scale (Stunkard, AJ., Sorenson, T., & Schulsinger, F, 1983), Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Scale-3 (Thompson, J. K, 1994) and Quality of Life Inventory (Frisch, 1994). Correlational analysis reveals a significant relationship between scores on each of the two SATAQ-3 subscales (Internatization-General and Pressure) and the Figure Rating Scale. However, the hypothesized relationship between the level of exposure to popular media and body dissatisfaction among older women was not detected. Results are examined with respect to two theories, Objectification Theory (Bartky, 1990) and Social Comparison Theory (Festinger, 1954), and support for the Social Comparison Theory as the better explanation for the current study's finding is presented.

To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: Beyond What is Covered: The Perceptions of Professional Identity for a New Teacher in a Culturally Different Environment

Author: Alexandre Stubbs

Abstract:

This study explores the discourses that occurred within me as a new teacher starting my career at a culturally 'different' school. In particular it examines how teaching in this environment impacted my own professional identities and my construction of those I perceived as being culterally 'different' or the 'other.' For purposes of this thesis identity will be defined as one's changing concept of herself and how she seeks to portray this concept to others through daily performances. This sense of self is formed by one's internal discourses regarding her own skills, values and abilities as well as external discourses on how she perceives her audience views her performances of self. Discourse in this study is defined as conveying meaning through language, clothing, gestures, body language, symbols or other means.

This study employs qualitative and autoethnographic methodologies. Over one hundred journal entries ranging from poems and prose to single sentence entries were analyzed for major thems and patterns. Finds indicated that when I as a new teacher felt my professionalism was not respected by the administration, I developed strong feelings of incompetence and fear of being revealed as an imposter. With the continuation of feeling judged and deemed as unprofessional or illegitimate by the administration, a discourse or perception of self and 'other' emerged in my daily journals. The importance of mutually respecting relationships with the socially constructed 'other' are highlighted along with the creation of a third space where discussions of 'differences' may occur. When both these elements became part of my experience the perception of my professional incompetence and the ominous 'other' faded.

To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Young People's Everyday Literacies: The Language Features of Instant Messaging

This journal article appeared in Research in the Teaching of English (Volume 45, Number 4):

Abstract:

In this article, we examine writing in the context of new communication technologies as a kind of everyday literacy. Using an inductive approach developed from grounded theory, we analyzed a 32,000-word corpus of college students' Instant Messaging (IM) exchanges. Through our analysis of this corpus, we identify a fifteen-item taxonomy of IM language features and frequency patterns which provide a detailed, data-rich picture of writers working within the technological and situational constraints of IM contexts to creatively inscribe into their written conversations important paralinguistic information. We argue that the written features of IM function paralinguistically to provide readers with cues as to how the writing is to be understood. By writing into the language paralinguistic cues, the participants in our study work to clarify, or more precisely disambiguate, meaning. Through a discussion of four of these features-eye dialect, slang, emoticons, and meta-markings-we suggest how the paralinguistic is inscribed in IM's language features.

Using Online Role-Play to Promote Collaborative Argument and Collective Action

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of English Journal (volume 100, Number 5).

Abstract:

Playing different characters in an online role-play, students explore controversial aspects of Internet filtering and adopt a plan to change their school's policy.

Provoking Dialogue: Promote a Deeper Understanding of Teaching and Learning through Images and Documents

This journal article appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of Canadian Children (Volume 35, Number 2).

Abstract:

A protocol for educational dialogue inspired by the conferences of Reggio Emilia, Italy and the mentor and preservice 'rounds for teachers' at Harvard Graduate School of Education (Seidel,1998) was introduced to pre-and-in-service early childhood educators. It was designed to create a forum for collaborative analysis and interpretation of pedagogical documentation. This was an attempt to inspire students toward a deeper understanding of young learners, contest narrow assumptions about children, and reframe pedagogical practices. The protocol and its subsequent "educational dialogue" affords many opportunities to contest/disrupt limited or stereo-typed perspectives through multiple readings and develop broader collective interpretations. Overall, the authors found this process furthered their students' understanding of children's ways of knowing, and as instructors, it made transparent many of the concerns, assumptions and values that pre-service and in-service educators bring to the classroom. This article discusses how this protocol was operationalized in university and college classrooms and how it may contribute to the development of more responsive teaching and learning environments. A description of its power and potential to develop educational dialogue, to provoke negotiation and to transform our taken-for-granted ideas about children's learning, as well as its limitations and challenges is offered.

Honouring Canada Day and Welcome to our Summer Students

The Education Library is closed to honour Canada Day on Friday July 1st.
We are also closed on Saturday July 2nd and Sunday July 3rd.
We welcome our CTE Additional Qualification (AQ) students and our summer graduate students on Monday July 4th.

People We Know: Rosamund Stooke and Pamela McKenzie

"Attending to the Small Stuff: Notes from an Observational Study of Neighbourhood Programmes for Very Young Children and Their Caregivers"


This journal article, co-written by Rosamund Stooke and Pamela McKenzie, appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of Canadian Children (Volume 35, Number 2).


Abstract:


This article presents findings from an observational study of neighbourhood programmes for very young children and their caregivers in two Canadian cities. Our findings suggest that some important work done in programmes would not be easily captured by traditional approaches to evaluation. By paying attention to what actually happened in programmes, we identify ways in which seemingly inconsequential actions and taken-for-granted practices facilitated and constrained the creation of children's and caregivers' learning opportunities and access to social support. In particular the article recommends that leaders pay close attention to ways that informal social interaction among caregivers can serve as a context in which social inclusion and exclusion are produced.

New Student Residence ~ South of Sarnia Road and West of Western Road

The Western News reports the following:


Construction of a new 1,000-bed student residence at The University of Western Ontario was given the green light by the Board of Governors Thursday, June 23rd, 2011.

Following reports of a surging first-year class size - more than 5,100 new students are expected in September - building approval for a new residence couldn't come soon enough. The growing incoming class is putting pressure on the current residence system to accommodate students taking advantage of the first-year residence guarantee.

"I think the need for additional housing is so apparent now, with a lot of support I think the board did the right thing," says Susan Grindrod, associate vice-president, Housing & Ancillary Services.

"Based on the process we've been through to get to this day, and certainly based on the enrolment numbers for this year, I think the board was satisfied in terms of our due diligence," she adds.

The new residence will be built on the Althouse College north parking lot, south of Sarnia Road and west of Western Road.

With the board approval, the final details of the design will be completed and the university will tender bids for construction companies. Crews are expected to break ground this fall (2011) with the residence slated to open in September 2013.

People We Know: Vicki Schwean and Carol Beynon

We welcome our new dean Dr. Vicki Schwean, and gratefully thank Dr. Carol Beynon for all of her support. Best wishes to both of you!

The Librarian is reading...

"The Principal as Leader of Challenging Conversations" one of the titles in the "Leading Student Achievement" series, and a joint publication with the Ontario Principals' Council.

Summary from the publisher's website:

Direct difficult discussions toward successful outcomes every time!


For every principal who has ever wished for a quick reference guide to keeping challenging conversations on course, the ideal tool is here! Inside are all the skills you need for navigating high-stakes interactions with staff, parents, students, and district leaders, and steering them toward win-win solutions.


Case studies throughout the book identify the risk areas and provide the steps to mastering techniques for

* Active listening
* Assertive communication
* Providing effective feedback
* Staying calm
* Problem solving
* Mediation

Also included are scripts, sample dialogues, style inventories, checklists, and resources for practicing skills learned from the case studies. Like having a communications coach in your back pocket, this guide gives tips for building a collaborative culture focused on what matters most--working together to achieve student success.

June 20, 2011

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated - have a look! The content of the Education Library's Facebook page is significantly different from the content of this blog so educational researchers will benefit from reading both the FB page and the blog. Enjoy!

Thesis: Bullying Beyond the Classroom: Grade and Gender Differences in Cyberbullying in Grades Four Through Eight

Author: Kara C. Brooks

Abstract:

The present study was conducted to investigate the grade and gender differences in cyberbullying in students from grades four through eight. It was predicted that femailes would experience cyberbullying and engage in cyberbullying more often than their male counterparts. It was also predicted that as the students progressed from grade four through to grade eight, the frequency of cyberbullying would increase. Data from a previous study in a large Southwestern Ontario school board was analyzed to investigate these thypotheses. Results indicated that cyberbullying was more frequent for female students than male students and also for the older students compared to the younger students. The results are discussed in terms of the relevance to previous findings. Implications for prevention programs in schools and suggestions for future research are discussed.


To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: Investigating Factors Placing Children at Risk for Homicide in the Context of Domestic Violence

Author: Leslie Hazel Anne Hamilton

Abstract:

Domestic homicide is among the most preventable homicides because of the number of know risk factors that include a history of domestic violence (DV). Extreme cases of domestic violence can also place children at risk for becoming victims of domestic homicide. Using a retrospective case analysis of 84 domestic homicide cases, this study identified the unique factors that place a child at risk for homicide. All DV cases were divided into three groups reflecting no child involvement, child homicide/attempted homicide, and no child homicide/attempted homicide. Comparisons using the three groups explore potential differences in background and known risk factors. A further analysis compared 12 cases matched on multiple variables reflecting child and adult homicides. Overall, the child homicides did not differ from other cases except for the following factors: perpetrator substance abuse at the time of the incident, the length of the relationship between the perpetrator and female intimate partner, forced sexual acts and/or assaults during sex, abuse of the female intimate partner in public, number of agencies involved, number of children the perpetrator has with another partner(s), and Child Protection Services Involvement with the family and/or awareness of domestic violence in the home. The implications of this study reflect community professionals need to assess for risk for children in all cases of domestic violence.


To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: The Principal's Perceived Role in Teacher Assessment Practices

Author: Brenda Anne Marie Hinschberger

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to explore the principal's perception of their role within the context of classroom assessments. Effective assessment practices have demonstrated the most consistent positive impact on student achievement. Research on the specific role of the principal in the process of classroom assessment has been limited.

This study used a qualitative methodology. Eight elementary principals with at least five years of experience were interviewed from both rural and urban schools in Southwestern Ontario. Interviews were conducted face-to-face using a semi-structured format.

There were three key findings from the study. Principals' level of assessment literacy varied, from having a very limited understanding of assessment literacy to a more comprehensive understanding. Principals had a very limited view of the elements of a sound assessment system, and the link between classroom and wide-scale assessments and reporting systems. Principals considered their role as more of a manager than an educational leader.

There were two recommendations offered: first, at the provincial level, that the government of Ontario develop more resources that include a common language about assessment and for the development of assessment literacy of the educational community; and second, that the local board look at the role of the principal from a leadership position.


To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: The Experiences of Literacy and Numeracy Coaches in Implementing Initiatives to Raise Student Achievement

Author: Katarzyna Ewa Kalat

Abstract:

This thesis examines the initiative involving the implementation of elementary Literacy and Numeracy Coaches. Using a case study, I examined the challenges and opportunities with which Literacy and Numeracy Coaches were confronted. The study concluded that Literacy and Numeracy Coaches have great potential for improving student achievement and raising improved teaching strategies through professional development. However, due to several factors, including: vague role definition; implementation of too many initiatives at the same time; the shifting of the role due to new initiatives encouraged by the Ministry and the board; and too little time for effective implementation, caused the coaches to be overloaded, and the schools to be unsure of the Coaches' role, thus reducing the potential effectiveness of the Coaching initiative. This study has made a contribution to the limited research on Literacy and Numeracy Coaching in Canada and provided the results that may help to inform future initiatives.

To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: The Importance and Place of the Essential Skills Training in Adult Education: A Case Study of the Integrated Learning Model

Author: Elena Poposka

Abstract:

The essential skills are the skills needed for work, learning, and life. They provide the foundation for learning other skills and enable people to evolve with their jobs and adapt to workplace and career change. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada identifies nine essential skills: reading, document use, numeracy, writing, oral communications, working with others, thinking, computer use, and continuous learning. In my research I investigated the effect that the essential skills training and the integrated learning model (ILM - critical, facilitated and independent learning environment) have on the students' attitude towards learning, motivation and confidence in their abilities to succeed in their new careers. A qualitative approach was used. Eight students from two learning centres participated in the study. Data were collected from interviews with students, centre managers, and students' journals over a six week period. Four categories of students were identified. It was determined that each group benefited in different ways. Two categories benefited the most from the essential skills training, and the ILM. The implications for further research are that age, ESL level, health issues, time provided for retraining, limited vocational options, and stress are factors that affect the extent to wich the participants are able to benefit.

To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

Thesis: Effects of Frequent Cooperative Quizzes on the Achievement of First year College Students Enrolled in a Mathematics Course

Author: Liliana Simion

Abstract:

This pilot study examines the effects of the frequent cooperative quizzes on the achievement and class engagement of first year college students enrolled in a mathematics course. The impact of this teaching and learning strategy is measure by four unit tests, a final exam, and a students' survey.


A mixed methods research procedure combines the quantitative data represented by students' test marks and students' answeres in a questionnaire with qualitative data represented by students' feelings and perceptions from the survey, and instructor's observations.

The results of the studen indicates that this teaching approach - frequent cooperative quizzes - is promising in increasing students' marks in unit tests and increasing students' final marks. However, the study did not perceive a notable improvement of students' final exam scores and indicated no change in students' completion rates. The study also reveals an increased attendance of students to classes, increased engagement in their learning, and inscreased student cooperation and support.


To see other Faculty of Education theses, click HERE and HERE.

June 9, 2011

eBook ~ If You Teach It, They Will Read: Literature's Life Lessons for Today's Students

Description of this book is from the publisher's website:


What does it mean to "teach" a poem, novel or play? Surely it is about lessons in comprehension and improvements in language facility, but what does literature teach us beyond literacy? Students can read substantive literature for what its authors intended: an insight into the human condition. Students, even those who appear indifferent, struggle with questions of right and wrong, good and evil, love and loss, self-interest and self-sacrifice. Using literature he has used with his students, MacLean insists that asking the right questions, discussing ideas that still matter, will show students that others have wrestled with the same issues, expressing that struggle in timeless stories. For the teacher of literature, the student of literature, the lover of literature, this book is a reminder of why, in the words of Maya Angelou, "we stumble and fall, and how, miraculously, we can stand up." What more important lesson is there?

eBook ~ Learning for Keeps: Teaching the Strategies Essential for Creating Independent Learners

The following information appears in the Preface of this book:

Apparently the case for teaching cognitive, procedural knowledge must be made convincingly and pragmatically. Owing to an explosion of scientific, cognitive, and educational research, we have known about the efficacy of strategy instruction for decades, yet it is the delivery of information and the preparation for assessments that still garner most of the time in today's classrooms.


The explanation is not hard to find. Teaching the learner how to learn as well as what is to be learned takes time. We are constantly battling time constraints in our classrooms. High-stakes testing preparation has become a nonnegotiable priority in most schools. In addition, the elementary school day is fragmented and frazzling. Pull-out programs leave teachers with precious few blocks of time in which their whole class is intact and available for a shared experience, the introduction of new topics, and the structuring or planning of activities. In most secondary schools, classes are circumscribed by class periods, and there is no continuity from one instructional block to another. The pressure to beat the bell and cover curriculum trumps lateral learning.

Even if those time constraints and test pressures were miraculously lifted, the preparation and training required for rethinking and shifting from content-driven to learner-driven teaching have not sufficiently pervaded the syllabi of our colleges and universities. Instead, we rely largely on the workshop, in-service model for staff development. Playing catch-up, however, has yielded only sketchy progress at best.

So what is a teacher to do when faced with the decision to either cover material and move on or cover less material in order to engage learners in lessons and dialogue that inform their thinking, enhance their problem-solving ability, and strengthen their key literacy behaviors? Conversely, how does a teacher opt for a practice test booklet once he has seen his students mentoring each other on how to organize their personal narratives?

eBook ~ Visualization in Mathematics, Reading and Science Education

The following description of this book is from the publisher's website:

Visualizations--either self-created or external visual stimuli used as an aid to learning--are probably as old as learning itself. Yet surprisingly little research has been done either into how precisely they help us learn, or how to produce ones that are effective pedagogical tools. This volume, a comprehensive review of theory and research on the use of visualization in mathematics, science and reading, contrasts the two dominant theoretical paradigms of how people construct and interpret visualizations. However, the authors never lose sight of practical applications, providing frequent, accessible synopses of research findings in addition to succinct summaries of how the research affects practice. Written by a team with decades of experience in research and practice in the three subjects, the chapters show how cognitive psychology can enhance practical pedagogy, place visualizations in their proper historical context, and analyze in detail the effectiveness of paper-, computer- and video-based visualizations, with some surprising results. The book is published at a time when, it seems, there is no limit to the art of creating visualizations, as powerful computers make graphics ever more colorful and realistic and 'interactivity' is firmly established as a buzzword in the educational lexicon. The aim of the volume is to explore some central questions in the field, including how to evaluate visualizations and whether or not they can act as an aid to reading development, and to mathematics and science learning. The authors also point to potentially fruitful subjects for future research, and offer their own conclusions and recommendations. As the debate continues over the value of visualizations, with polarized arguments on the one hand lauding them and on the other dismissing them as gimmicks, this book introduces a voice of reason to the discussion that will be welcomed by psychologists and educationalists alike.

eBook ~ The Oxford Handbook of Eating Disorders

This description is from the publisher's website:

Oxford Handbooks offer authoritative and up-to-date reviews of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned chapters from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates, as well as a foundation for future research. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.


A rich source of authoritative content that supports reading and study in the field, The Oxford Handbook of Eating Disorders reviews current research and clinical developments through synthetic chapters written by experts from various fields of study and clinical backgrounds. Epidemiologic studies suggest that eating disorders are not only common but have increased in prevalence in recent decades, and this handbook refines and updates the state of research.

The book is divided into four sections: phenomenology and epidemiology of the eating disorders, approaches to understanding the disorders, assessment and comorbidities of the disorders, and prevention and treatment. The first section deals with classification and epidemiology of the disorders, considerations for revisions to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and the somewhat neglected topic of eating disorders in childhood and early adolescence. The second section describes research basic to understanding the eating disorders and addresses biological factors, psychosocial risk factors, cultural factors, and the effects of behaviors such as dieting and eating and weight concerns in the genesis of the eating disorders. The third section describes assessment of the eating disorders, medical and psychological comorbidities, and medical management. The final section deals with various treatment modalities that have been found successful, including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic approaches; an overview of evidence-based treatment for the eating disorders; and a consideration of what we know about cost-effectiveness of existing treatments.

The multiple perspectives and breadth of scope offered by The Oxford Handbook of Eating Disorders make it an invaluable resource for clinicians, researchers, and educators, as well as scholars and students.


eBook ~ Interacting with Information

This abstract is from the publisher's website:

We live in an "information age," but information is only useful when it is interpreted by people and applied in the context of their goals and activities. The volume of information to which people have access is growing at an incredible rate, vastly outstripping people's ability to assimilate and manage it. In order to design technologies that better support information work, it is necessary to better understand the details of that work.

In this book, we review the situations (physical, social and temporal) in which people interact with information.

We also discuss how people interact with information in terms of an "information journey," in which people, iteratively, do the following: recognise a need for information, find information, interpret and evaluate that information in the context of their goals, and use the interpretation to support their broader activities.

People's information needs may be explicit and clearly articulated but, conversely, may be tacit, exploratory and evolving. Widely used tools supporting information access, such as searching on the Web and in digital libraries, support clearly defined information requirements well, but they provide limited support for other information needs. Most other stages of the information journey are poorly supported at present. Novel design solutions are unlikely to be purely digital, but to exploit the rich variety of information resources, digital, physical and social, that are available.

Theories of information interaction and sensemaking can highlight new design possibilities that augment human capabilities. We review relevant theories and findings for understanding information behaviours, and we review methods for evaluating information working tools, to both assess existing tools and identify requirements for the future.

eBook ~ Reading and Writing the Electronic Book

This abstract is from the publisher's website:

Developments over the last twenty years have fueled considerable speculation about the future of the book and of reading itself. This book begins with a gloss over the history of electronic books, including the social and technical forces that have shaped their development. The focus then shifts to reading and how we interact with what we read: basic issues such as legibility, annotation, and navigation are examined as aspects of reading that ebooks inherit from their print legacy. Because reading is fundamentally communicative, I also take a closer look at the sociality of reading: how we read in a group and how we share what we read. Studies of reading and ebook use are integrated throughout the book, but Chapter 5 "goes meta" to explore how a researcher might go about designing his or her own reading-related studies.


No book about ebooks is complete without an explicit discussion of content preparation, i.e., how the electronic book is written. Hence, Chapter 6 delves into the underlying representation of ebooks and efforts to create and apply markup standards to them. This chapter also examines how print genres have made the journey to digital and how some emerging digital genres might be realized as ebooks. Finally, Chapter 7 discusses some beyond-the-book functionality: how can ebook platforms be transformed into portable personal libraries? In the end, my hope is that by the time the reader reaches the end of this book, he or she will feel equipped to perform the next set of studies, write the next set of articles, invent new ebook functionality, or simply engage in a heated argument with the stranger in seat 17C about the future of reading.

June 8, 2011

'Walking Yourself Around as a Teacher': Gender and Embodiment in Student Teachers' Working Lives

This article appears in the March 2011 issue of British Journal of Sociology of Education (Volume 32, Number 2).

Abstract:

This paper considers the psychic and social dynamics reported by student teachers when learning to embody their teacher persona in the secondary school environment. Focusing on gender dimensions of embodiment and drawing on qualitative interview data from a UK study of postgraduate teacher-training students, teaching is examined as a physical experience. The paper conceptualises findings under two related headings: the appropriately gendered body, signified by heteronormative readings of gender and sexuality; and the gendered authoritative body, conceptualised as male. The 'teacher body' emerges as an important element of student teachers' stories of trying to fit with the new professional environment and the paper concludes by arguing for a consideration of gender and body politics in the practice and training of teachers, thus challenging the assumption that professional occupations are essentially 'disembodied' and gender neutral.

Challenges and Inspirations: Student Teachers' Experiences in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Teacher Education and Special Education (Volume 34, Number 2).

Abstracts:

Preparing teachers to meet the needs of children with disabilities remains a complex challenge. General education teachers feel unprepared, and attrition and teacher shortages in special education remain high. Despite a trend toward inclusive education, many children continue to be educated in segregated settings. This study explores the potential challenges and learning opportunities that self-contained settings offer early childhood special education teachers in training. Five early childhood preservice students seeking dual certification reflected on their placements in self-contained early childhood special education classrooms. Through an analysis of their weekly student teaching journals, we explored students' experiences in segregated early childhood special education classrooms and implications for teacher education. Our findings revealed that including a self-contained setting as one of several field experiences encouraged future teachers to think flexibly about teaching children with special needs while enhancing their understanding of the principles behind the continuum of services.

Essential Inclusive Education-Related Outcomes for Alberta Preservice Teachers

This article appears in the Summer 2010 issue of the Alberta Journal of Educational Research (Volume 56, Number 2).

Abstract:

This article examines the knowledge, skills, and attributes (KSAs) that Alberta preservice teachers need to develop over the course of their teacher preparation programs in order to work effectively in inclusive classrooms. Inclusive classrooms are those where all students regardless of diversity learn in the same contexts. These KSAs are presented as program outcomes and are identified in relation to their prominence in the literature on inclusion and their alignment with Alberta education policy and teacher interim certification requirements. They were then reviewed by a focus group of representatives from teacher preparation institutions in Alberta and Canada. The author suggests that teacher preparation institutions in Alberta must ensure that these outcomes are addressed at multiple points throughout their teacher preparation programs.

How and Why Do Student Teachers Use ICT?

This article appears in the June 2011 isuee of the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper examines how and why student teachers made use of information and communication technology (ICT) during a 1-year initial teacher education programme from 2008 to 2009. This is a mixed methods study involving a survey (N = 340) of the entire cohort and a series of semi-structured interviews with a sample of student teachers within the cohort (N = 21). The study explored several themes, including the nature of student teachers' use of ICT; variation in the use of ICT; support for, and constraints on, using ICT; attitudes to ICT and to teaching and learning more generally. It was found that nearly all teachers were receptive to using ICT - more so than their in-service counterparts - and made frequent use of it during their placement (internship) experience. The Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) was central to nearly all student teachers' use of ICT, in good part, because it was already used by their mentors and was widely accessible. Student teachers' use of ICT was categorized in three levels. Routine users focused mostly on the use of the IWB for whole class teaching; extended users gave greater opportunities for pupils to use ICT for themselves; innovative student teachers used ICT in a greater range of contexts and made more effort to overcome barriers such as access. ICT use was seen as emerging from a mix of factors: chiefly student teachers' access to ICT; their feeling of 'self-efficacy' when using ICT; and their belief that ICT had a positive impact on learning - in particular, the impact on pupils' behavioural and affective engagement. Factors which influenced ICT use included mentoring, training and support. Limitations on student teachers' use of ICT are explored and it is suggested that new teachers need to be supported in developing a more discerning use as they begin their teaching careers

Can Teachers Motivate Students to Learn?

This journal article appears in the July 2011 issue of Educational Studies (Volume 37, Number 3).

Abstract:

Research on motivation has mainly concentrated on the role of goal orientation and self-evaluation in conducting learning activities. In this paper, we examine the relative importance of teachers' teaching and their efficacy beliefs to explain variation in student motivation. Questionnaires were used to measure the well-being, academic self-efficacy, mastery goal orientation, performance avoidance, intrinsic motivation and school investment of students (n = 3462) and the teaching practices and teachers' sense of self-efficacy (n = 194) in primary schools. Results of the multi-level analyses show that connection to the students' world and cooperative learning methods had a positive effect on students' motivation, while process-oriented instruction by the teacher had a negative effect on motivational behaviour and motivational factors of students. Finally, the results lend credence to the argument that teachers' sense of self-efficacy has an impact on both teachers' teaching and students' motivation to learn.

Toward Strengthening the Preparation of Teacher Educator-Researchers in Doctoral Programs and Beyond

This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of Teacher Education (Volume 62, Number 3).

Abstract:

Educators scholars and policy makers agree that quality research is needed to improve teaching and teacher education. This is especially true in the current climate of increasing pressures to produce research that can guide policy making in an age of standards based reform and teacher accountability. As pressures to enhance student achievement and teaching practice mount so too does the demand for better and more rigorous empirical educational research that can inform policies and practice. Critical to this improvement is the preparation and training of educational researchers in doctoral programs. Here, Lin et al provoke thought and dialogue about how to prepare better teacher educator researchers in research focused doctoral programs and propose possible research areas that may be useful to strengthening or rethinking their preparation.

1:1 Mobile Inquiry Learning Experience for Primary Science Students: A Study of Learning Effectiveness

This article appears in the June 2011 issue of the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper presents the findings of a research project in which we transformed a primary (grade) 3 science curriculum for delivery via mobile technologies, and a teacher enacted the lessons over the 2009 academic year in a class in a primary school in Singapore. The students had a total of 21 weeks of the mobilized lessons in science, which were co-designed by teachers and researchers by tapping into the affordances of mobile technologies for supporting inquiry learning in and outside of class. We examine the learning effectiveness of the enacted mobilized science curriculum. The results show that among the six mixed-ability classes in primary (grade) 3 in the school, the experimental class performed better than other classes as measured by traditional assessments in the science subject. With mobilized lessons, students were found to learn science in personal, deep and engaging ways as well as developed positive attitudes towards mobile learning.

Recurrent Routines: Analyzing and Supporting Orchestration in Technology-Enhanced Primary Classrooms

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

The increasing presence of multiple Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the classroom does not guarantee an improvement of the learning experiences of students, unless it is also accompanied by pedagogically effective orchestration of those technologies. In order to help teachers in this endeavour, it can be useful to understand how this orchestration takes place in real-world classrooms, and to provide teachers with professional development opportunities that can be easily applied to their everyday classroom practice. This paper describes a qualitative field study conducted in five primary school classrooms where a new collaborative software was introduced alongside existing classroom technology. For six months, teachers designed and orchestrated classroom activities in these authentic, technologically-rich settings. The analysis of the resulting activity designs and enactments uncovered a limited set of recurrent elements of teacher practice, or routines. These routines and their graphical representation are posited as a useful analysis tool for researchers in understanding complex teacher practices with ICT. Moreover, the authors propose that these routines offer new opportunities for professional development of teachers in effectively using ICT in their classrooms. Initial uses of these routines in teacher workshops, with encouraging results, are also presented.

The Librarian is reading...

"Parental Acceptance of Digital Game-Based Learning" which appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

In research about digital game-based learning, the likely negative perceptions of parents are often enlisted as a barrier toward the adoption of games in classroom settings. Teachers, students and policy makers appear to be influenced by what parents think about games in the classroom. Therefore, it is important to study these parental beliefs about games. The present research develops and validates a path model to explain and predict parental acceptation of video games in the classrooms of their children. The hypothetical model was found reliable and valid, based on a survey of 858 parents with at least one child in secondary education. Overall, the results show that 59% of the variance in parents' preference for video games can be explained by the model comprising hypotheses about learning opportunities, subjective norm, perceived negative effects of gaming, experience with video games, personal innovativeness, and gender.

June 7, 2011

eBook ~ Radicalizing Learning: Adult Education For A Just World

Description of this book:

From acclaimed teaching experts Brookfield and Holst, this book offers a comprehensive overview of the practices and ideas that combine to create an understanding and facilitation of adult learning. It includes information on what adult learning is and how it can best be facilitated. Written from the perspective of the central roots of adult education (as a movement that helps adults learn what it means to participate fully in a genuine political and economic democracy) the book explores the areas of adult learning, training, teaching, facilitation, program development, and research.

eBook ~ Academic Leadership Day By Day: Small Steps That Lead to Great Success

Description of this book is from the publisher's website:

It can seem at times as though all of academic administration today is focused only on the need for continual change and the endless pursuit of "the big idea." But most academic leaders, from department chairs and program directors through university presidents and chancellors, are far too busy helping their institutions flourish for them to divert critical energy and resources to yet another untried theory or management principle. Academic Leadership Day by Day takes an entirely different approach to developing your proven academic leadership: It introduces one practical and field-tested idea each day for an entire academic year. Rather than requiring you to devote days or even weeks to administrative training (which may prove to be of little use in the end), this manual gives you no-nonsense suggestions that you can consider on even your busiest days. Experiment with the suggestions made each day, discover what works for you, and then build on your successes for the benefit of your institution and its programs. Significant improvements often result from small, gradual, and consistent efforts, and Academic Leadership Day by Day is your guide to becoming a more accomplished, confident academic leader a few minutes at a time.

Sites We Like ~ First Monday

First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to the Internet. Since its start in May 1996, First Monday has published 1,119 papers in 179 issues, written by 1,437 different authors. In addition, nine special issues have appeared.

New Electronic Resource ~ LootedArt.com

LootedArt.com, the central registry of information on looted cultural property from 1933-1945, contains two fully searchable databases. The Information Database contains information and documentation from forty nine countries, including laws and policies, reports and publications, archival records and resources, current cases and relevant websites. The Object Database contains details of over 25,000 objects of all kinds - paintings, drawings, antiquities, Judaica, etc - looted, missing and/or identified from over fifteen countries.

Description from the online catalogue:

The Central Registry is a charitable body operating under the auspices of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, which is an independent unit of the University of Oxford and was established through an initiative of the Commission for Looted Art in Europe, a non-profit, expert, representative body in Europe which negotiates policies and procedures, assists families with the identification and recovery of looted cultural property, and provides guidance and information to institutions and governments worldwide. This site contains two fully searchable databases. The Information Database contains information and documentation from forty nine countries, including laws and policies, reports and publications, archival records and resources, current cases and relevant websites. The Object Database contains details of over 25,000 objects of all kinds - paintings, drawings, antiquities, Judaica, etc - looted, missing and/or identified from over fifteen countries.

An Investigation Into the Ways in Which Art Is Taught in English Reception Classes

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts (Volume 5, Number 2).

Abstract:

Experimentally based research within developmental psychology has suggested that the way children are taught art shapes their artistic growth. Thus, researchers have begun to acknowledge the importance of studying the wider contexts that shape children's experiences of art. This paper builds on previous educational policy based research by examining how art is taught in English Primary Schools. Ethnographic methods informed by social constructionism are used to investigate the ways in which Reception teachers work with 4-5 year old children during art lessons held in two English primary schools. Reflexive ethnography and a synthesis approach to discourse analysis are utilized to examine (a) the positions adopted by teachers as they introduce an art activity and (b) wider art values drawn upon to conceptualize "good" art. It is argued that teachers adopt differing approaches which promote realistic art. This is discussed in relation to curriculum policy and practice.

Thinking Styles and Conceptions of Creativity Among University Students

This journal article appears in Educational Psychology (Volume 31, Number 3, 2011).

Abstract:

This research aims to understand university students' thinking styles and the relationship with their views of creativity. The Thinking Styles Inventory- Revised II was used to measure 13 thinking styles as defined in Sternberg's theory of mental self-government and the Conceptions of Creativity Scales was used to inquire students' views about the conditions for evaluating creativity from six aspects: intelligence, knowledge, style of thinking, personality, motivation and learning environment. Significant relationships were identified between thinking styles and conceptions of creativity. This research contributes to the understanding about the relationship between conceptions of creativity and thinking styles, and brings insights for educators about educational innovations, as one of the key objectives of educational innovations is to develop creativity of the younger generation
.

Teachers' and Education Students' Perceptions of and Reactions to Children with and without the Diagnostic Label "ADHD"

This article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Journal of School Psychology (Volume 49, Number 1).

Abstract:

Thirty-four elementary school teachers and 32 education students from Canada rated their reactions towards vignettes describing children who met attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom criteria that included or did not include the label "ADHD." "ADHD"-labeled vignettes elicited greater perceptions of the child's impairment as well as more negative emotions and less confidence in the participants, although it also increased participants' willingness to implement treatment interventions. Ratings were similar to vignettes of boys versus girls; however, important differences in ratings between teachers and education students emerged and are discussed. Finally, we investigated the degree to which teachers' professional backgrounds influenced bias based on the label "ADHD." Training specific to ADHD consistently predicted label bias, whereas teachers' experience working with children with ADHD did not.

Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions of an Overseas Field Experience Programme

This article appeared in the March 2011 issue of Australian Journal of Teacher Education (Volume 36, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper aims to present a small group of pre-service English teachers' perceptions towards the overseas field experience programme jointly organised by a university in Canada and the teacher trainer institute in Hong Kong. The study involved seven Canadian Year 3 and 4 B.Ed. TESL students who participated in the investigated eight-week overseas field experience programme to Hong Kong. A purely qualitative method was adopted in which a semi-structured interview was conducted and the participants were asked to keep fieldwork logs to obtain their views of the programme. The results of the study show that the participants were highly positive about this overseas field experience because they could understand more about the nature of Chinese ESL students through their teaching experience in Hong Kong. The paper concludes by suggesting that an effective collaboration and communication among the partnership universities and the linking schools is particularly important because it can make the participants benefit most from the programme.

Interconnecting Networks of Practice for Professional Learning

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning (Volume 12, Number 3).

Abstract:

The article explores the complementary connections between communities of practice and the ways in which individuals orchestrate their engagement with others to further their professional learning. It does so by reporting on part of a research project conducted in New Zealand on teachers' online professional learning in a university graduate diploma program on ICT education. Evolving from social constructivist pedagogy for online professional development, the research describes how teachers create their own networks of practice as they blend online and offline interactions with fellow learners and workplace colleagues. Teachers' perspectives of their professional learning activities challenge the way universities design formal online learning communities and highlight the potential for networked learning in the zones and intersections between professional practice and study. The article extends the concepts of Lave and Wenger's (1991) communities of practice social theory of learning by considering the role participants play in determining their engagement and connections in and across boundaries between online learning communities and professional practice. It provides insights into the applicability of connectivist concepts for developing online pedagogies to promote socially networked learning and emphasising the role of the learner in defining their learning pathways.

Funds of Knowledge: An Investigation of Coherence Within the Literature

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

Two decades ago academics based at the University of Arizona brought the anthropological concept of Funds of Knowledge into the educational realm, providing a new conceptual framework to counter deficit theorizing of Latino students and their families. The growing body of literature evidences the belief and hope of academics in the potential of Funds of Knowledge to advance social justice and facilitate long-awaited breakthroughs in multicultural education practice. This paper provides an overview and analysis of Funds of Knowledge literature, addressing two key questions: What is the current scope of settings for Funds of Knowledge research? What do writers mean when they talk about Funds of Knowledge? Findings of differences in definitions indicate their contested nature. The review recommends clear articulation by researchers of the definition employed. Key questions arising from studies are presented and implications for multicultural education practice and teacher education are discussed.

Pedagogy for Developing Critical Thinking in Adolescents: Explicit Instruction Produces Greatest Gains

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Thinking Skills and Creativity (Volume 6, Number 1).

Abstract:

Although the development and transfer of critical thinking skills are recognized as primary goals for education, there is little empirical evidence to help educators decide how to teach in ways that enhance critical thinking. In two studies, we compared explicit and imbedded instructional modes and assessed critical thinking with the Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment, which uses both constructed response and multiple-choice response formats with everyday situations. Participants were high school students in the United States attending low-performing high schools with large minority enrollment. In both studies, the students receiving explicit instruction showed much larger gains than those in the imbedded instruction group. Grade point average was significantly related to critical thinking scores, but as expected its relationship with critical thinking was much weaker than standardized test scores. These results provide robust evidence that explicit instruction is an effective method for teaching critical thinking skills to high school students.

Internationally Educated Female Teachers in the Neoliberal Context: Their Labour Market and Teacher Certification Experiences in Canada

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

In this paper, we consider the difficulties that a group of internationally educated female teachers (female IETs) encountered in the process of seeking certification in the Canadian Maritimes. We read their experiences in the context of neoliberalism, in particular how they are positioned in the labour force and also the teaching profession. We consider the material effects of differences such as gender, race, ethnicity, and regional location for the female IETs. Further, we underscore implications for teacher education.

Becoming Researchers in the Field of Teaching and Teacher Education

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 4).

Abstract:

As we turn toward 2011, we look back across the key questions and topics addressed by TATE authors during 2010 and wonder what it tells us about the research field of teaching and teacher education. We do not pretend to know the whole of the field of research on, of and for teaching and teacher education, but we can provide a general picture of what we see. We also checked the Journal online information page for the most recent, top cited and most downloaded articles to see if we, in fact, seemed to follow those aims. As we studied the manuscripts published in TATE in 2010, we found a range of content. We saw articles about special education, curriculum, pedagogy and emotions. We also saw studies about children, parents and community. These were not the most frequently addressed topics but they recurred during the year. More frequently, we found articles around LGBTQ issues, literacy, beliefs and learning. After looking over these topics and questions, we wonder what we might share with our authors and potential authors about participating as researchers in the field. We suggest that we continue to encourage ourselves and others who participate in the field of research on, of, and for teaching and teacher education to continue to push forward ideas, to allow our research to allow new possible understandings and insights.

Understanding New Teachers' Professional Identities Through Metaphor

This journal article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 4).

Abstract:

This qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews examines the metaphors new teachers use to describe their professional identities and compares metaphors chosen immediately following graduation with those suggested part way through their first year of teaching. Findings indicate that new teachers make a shift from seeing themselves as ready for the challenge, to adopting a survival mode. The metaphors suggest that new teachers struggle to develop a professional identity during their first year, and that this development process is gradual, complex and often problematic. Implications for teacher education indicate that greater emphasis needs to be placed on exploring professional identity in pre-service programmes.

Effects of Teaching and Learning Styles on Students' Reflection Levels for Ubiquitous Learning

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

Ubiquitous learning (u-learning), in conjunction with supports from the digital world, is recognized as an effective approach for situating students in real-world learning environments. Earlier studies concerning u-learning have mainly focused on investigating the learning attitudes and learning achievements of students, while the causations such as learning style and teaching style were usually ignored. This study aims to investigate the effects of teaching styles and learning styles on reflection levels of students within the context of u-learning. In particular, we investigated the teaching styles at the dimensions of brainstorming and instruction and recall and the learning styles at the dimensions of active and reflective learning. The experiment was conducted with 39 fifth grader students at an elementary school in southern Taiwan. A u-learning environment was established at a butterfly ecology garden to conduct experiments for natural science courses. The experimental results of one-way ANCOVA show that those students who received a matching teaching-learning style presented a significant improvement in their reflection level. That is, matching the learning styles of students with the appropriate teaching styles can significantly improve students' reflection levels in a u-learning environment.

Effects of Coaching on Teacher Use of Sociocultural Instructional Practices

This journal article appears in the May 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 4).

Abstract:

This study evaluates a performance-based instructional coaching model intended to improve teacher pedagogy and classroom organization for educating diverse student populations. Elementary teachers (N = 21) participated in a 30-h workshop and seven individual coaching sessions across an academic year. The coaching model promoted use of the Standards for Effective Pedagogy, five research-based practices known to increase student achievement. Findings demonstrate performance-based instructional coaching led to statistically significant (a) improvements in teacher pedagogy, (b) patterns of teacher growth, and (c) changes in classroom organization. Implications for improving teachers' ultimate achievement, the coaching protocol, and research are addressed.

iPads: Why Mobile?

This journal article appeared in March/April 2011 EDUCAUSE Review (Volume 46, Number 2).

Abstract:

Most students entering some classrooms were born between 1978 and 1995. Commonly referred to as Millennials, Boomlets, or the Net Generation, they have been characterized as born consumers, digital natives, tech-savvy highly social, always connected, collaborative, multi-tasking, impatient, lifestyle-focused, craving of diverse media, desiring open access to everything, and leading 24/7 lives. Given the recent and rapidly growing access to a dazzling array of intellectual technologies, faculty and staff at Seton Hill, a liberal arts university focused on excellence in teaching, have seized the opportunity to experiment with and, they hope, improve, the learning experience. In early spring 2010, the university decided to provide iPads to all full-time students in the coming fall. Faculty are primary to the success of the Griffin Technology Advantage program. They have devoted the time needed to redesign instruction. A widespread implementation of any new campus initiative calls for a comprehensive assessment plan.

EDUCAUSE Review (ER)

EDUCAUSE Review (ER) is the association's award-winning magazine for the higher education IT community.


Published bimonthly in print (22,000 distributed copies) and online (over 50,000 visits per month), the magazine takes a broad look at current developments and trends in information technology, how they may affect the college/university as an institution, and what these mean for higher education and society.


In addition to EDUCAUSE members, the magazine's audience consists of presidents/chancellors, senior academic and administrative leaders, non-IT staff, faculty in all disciplines, librarians, and corporate staff/leaders.


The magazine has won numerous editorial and design awards including APEX Awards for Publication Excellence, Magnum Opus Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Custom Publishing, Ozzie Awards for Excellence in Magazine Design, and Tabbies Awards, as well as being named Publication of the Year by the Colorado Society of Association Executives

EDUCAUSE Quarterly (EQ)

EDUCAUSE Quarterly (ISSN 1528-5324) is an online, peer-reviewed, practitioner's journal from EDUCAUSE about managing and using information resources in higher education.


EQ is published in an online-only format with multimedia (graphics, live links, audio, and video) and community-building applications that enhance the magazine's value. Beyond the content, you'll be able to experience and interact with information and others in the community in more engaging ways, all while adopting a more environmentally sustainable approach.


EQ readers are generally individuals involved in diverse areas professionally on campus, including administrative computer services, information systems development, user services, telecommunications and networking, academic computer services, institutional research and planning, database administration and data administration, and instructional technology development and coordination.

Most readers are central IT organization staff, but the readership includes individuals who work in campus libraries, institutional research and planning offices, central administration and academic offices, academic department libraries, institutional research offices, and administrative and academic offices.

EQ publishes materials that relate to planning, developing, managing, using, and evaluating information resources in higher education. Information resources encompass technology, services, and information

Sites We Like ~ EDUCAUSE

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated with information that is significantly different than the material appearing in this blog - have a look!

Caregiver Perspectives About Assistive Technology Use With Their Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

This journal article appeared in Infants and Young Children (Volume 24, Number 2, 2011).

Abstract:

The purpose was to examine how caregivers of infants and toddlers with autism spectrum disorder view their daily activities/routines and in what way, if any, assistive technology (AT) acts as a support. A total of 134 families who reported their child's disability as autism spectrum disorder/pervasive developmental disorder completed a survey designed to gain information about activities/routines (eg, bath time, mealtime, etc) and potential use of AT to support a child's participation in the routine. Frequency counts were utilized to determine the percentage of caregiver responses in each activity/routine category. Responses to open-ended questions were examined and coded to supplement the information gained through the forced-choice questions. Results indicated that caregivers reported difficulties with all sampled activities/routine. The problem reported most frequently(39.9%) was a child's inability to participate in the routine. Less than half of the caregivers reported being able to find solutions that incorporated the use of AT. Although some caregivers reported using AT, actual use of AT was minimal. In addition, caregivers reported limited support and training on the use of AT. Assistive technology has been established as an effective means of providing intervention during daily activities/routines. Research indicates caregivers have large misconceptions about what AT is and receive minimal support from their early intervention providers in understanding AT.

Identification of Gifted Students with Learning Disabilities in a Response-to-Intervention Era

This journal article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Psychology in the Schools (Volume 48, Number 2).

Abstract:

The identification of children who are twice-exceptional--those who are gifted and have concomitant learning disabilities (LDs)--has historically posed a number of challenges for school psychologists and other school personnel. With the reauthorization of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act and the shift to the use of a Response-to-Intervention (RtI) model to identify students with LDs, the task of identifying those who are twice exceptional is even more daunting. This article proposes an integrated model for the identification of gifted children with LDs that blends standardized assessment methods with practices consistent with Rtl. This balanced approach brings together the best of both worlds to more accurately identify twice-exceptional students and better meet their educational needs.

People We Know: George Gadanidis, Janette Hughes and Michelle Cordy

George Gadanidis, Janette Hughes and Michelle Cordy co-authored this journal article appearing in the Spring 2011 issue of Journal for the Education of the Gifted (Volume 32, Number 3).

Abstract:

In this paper we report on a study of a short-term mathematics program for grade 7-8 gifted students that integrated open-ended mathematics tasks with the arts (poetry and drama) and with technology. The program was offered partially online and partially in a classroom setting. The study sought to investigate (a) students' perceptions of their school-based mathematics experience, (b) students' perceptions of the program we offered, and (c) students' mathematical thinking while engaged in the activities of our program. The study provides insights into the design of challenging mathematics experiences for gifted students, the integration of the arts with mathematics, and the use of technology in mathematics teaching and learning.

Teachers' Beliefs About Culturally, Linguistically, and Economically Diverse Gifted Students: A Quantitative Study

This journal article appears in Roeper Review (Volume 33, Issue 2, 2011).

Abstract:

This study investigated teachers' beliefs about culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse (CLED) gifted students. The newly developed Teachers' Beliefs About Culturally, Linguistically, and Economically Diverse Gifted Students Survey was administered to a stratified, random sample of 4,000 teachers from eight states. Three hundred and eight responses (7.7% response rate) were received. Respondents believed that it would benefit gifted programs if CLED students were included and above-average abilities were found in all economic strata and cultural groups and that IQ and standardized tests do not accurately reflect the abilities of CLED students. Through multivariate analyses of variance, significant group differences were found on two factors of the survey based on whether respondents worked in states with mandates for gifted education or not.

June 6, 2011

Sites We Like ~ The Digitized Teacher Librarian

Coming to us from Sydney, Australia this blog provides some interesting reading for all educators.

The Librarian is reading...

"The Library is Undead: Information Seeking During the Zombie Apocalypse" which appeared the Journal of Library Innovation (Volume 1, Issue 2, 2010).

Abstract:

Academic libraries should be aware of trends in popular culture that appeal to students and design programs that engage them in participatory experiences. At the University of Florida, more than 1,000 undergraduates participate in the campus-wide alternate reality game (ARG) Humans vs. Zombies. Through a partnership with the game designers, librarians successfully created a library mission that allowed zombie-hunting students to apply 21st century learning skills such as communication; collaboration; critical thinking; problem solving; creativity; innovation; and information, media, and technology literacy. This article describes the development, marketing, and assessment of the game.

June 2, 2011

How to Integrate Digital Media into a Drop-In for Homeless Young People for Deepening Relationships Between Youth and Adults

This journal article appears in the May 2011 issue of Children & Youth Services Review (Volume 33, Number 5).

Abstract:

This paper reports on a curriculum called New Tech for Youth Sessions, designed for homeless young people, aged 13-25. Motivated by the ordinariness of digital media and its importance in communicating with society's institutions, the primary goal of the curriculum was to develop students' life skills for information technology and digital media. A crucial secondary goal was to position students to recognize their self-worth, through meeting challenges, positive communication with adults, and reciprocal peer support. The paper describes how these goals were addressed by incorporating a community technology center into a multi-purpose drop-in for homeless young people and by a curriculum that guides students through an integrated series of activities related to finding employment. The paper discusses the principles underlying the curriculum, the class processes, and the social structure that supports the learning environment. A far-reaching result, based on offering 13 classes to over 75 youth over 16months, is the hypothesis that instruction in digital media can create visceral, life-affirming experiences of challenges overcome, which can help strengthen relationships between the youth and the drop-in staff. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned for incorporating digital media into drop-ins for enabling access and for improving life skills.

Hitting the Reset Button on Education: Student Reports on Going to College

This journal article appears in the May 2011 issue of Career Development for Exceptional Individuals (Volume 34, Number 1).

Abstract:

Students with intellectual disabilities are taking the lead conducting participatory action research (PAR) to chronicle their college experience as part of a national college access initiative. This research currently involves college students with intellectual disabilities documenting their experiences using multimedia tools. These data are then shared via a digital storytelling Web site, VoiceThread. This article presents an overview of PAR, digital storytelling, and the methodology used to implement PAR with students with intellectual disabilities. Themes from the students' work highlight their impressions of college, their adjustment to new expectations and responsibilities, and their recommendations to improve this experience. The researcher's findings and conclusions about facilitating research with young adults with intellectual disabilities are described.

Modeling primary school pre-service teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) for meaningful learning with information and communication technology (ICT)

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

Within the field of educational technology, Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) has been theorized as a seven-factor construct to describe teacher's integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in their teaching. However, this framework has yet to be successfully validated through survey instruments. This paper examines the construct validity of a TPACK survey that was contextualized for the pedagogical approaches employed in a 12-week ICT course designed with reference to the TPACK framework for Singaporean primary school pre-service teachers. Using this framework, the researchers were able to uncover five of the seven TPACK constructs which were a better model fit as compared with several extant studies of TPACK surveys. Using these results, pre and post-course structural equation models were constructed to explain the relationships amongst the different constructs of teachers' TPACK perceptions. It was found that pedagogical knowledge had a direct impact on TPACK at the beginning of the course. As teachers made connections between their technological knowledge and pedagogical knowledge to form technological pedagogical knowledge during the course, the direct relation between pedagogical knowledge and TPACK became insignificant where as the relations between pedagogical knowledge and technological pedagogical knowledge, and technological pedagogical knowledge and TPACK were strengthened. The comparison between the pre and post-course models also revealed that the pre-service teachers' perceived relations between content knowledge and TPACK changes from insignificant to significant. The implications of these findings and suggestions to improve the construct validation of the TPACK framework are discussed in this paper.

Design and Implementation of a Student-Generated Virtual Museum in a Language Curriculum to Enhance Collaborative Multimodal Meaning-Making

This journal article appears in the August 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 57, Number 1).

Abstract:

This paper reports on a study, MUSE, which involved Secondary (Grade 7) students in designing and constructing a virtual museum. It presents a description and evaluation of the design and implementation of the technologically-mediated intervention within a language curriculum that emphasizes multimodal meaning-making and expression. Participants' gallery artifacts, interviews, reflections and classroom observations indicated signs of an emergent multimodal awareness with a growing sensitivity to semiotic affordances and constraints. Collaborative learning skills acquired and language learning motivational gains were evident. The investigation identified responsive, adaptive measures in overcoming unanticipated challenges arising from on-the-ground realities and contextual constraints. The study showed the viability, to a certain extent, of innovative technologically-enhanced interventions in reinforcing instructional pedagogy in classroom contexts.

New Book: Teaching Mathematics Using ICT (Third Edition)

This summary of the book is from the publisher's website:

This fully-updated third edition of Teaching Mathematics using ICT incorporates all the most recent developments in mathematics education, including the new National Curriculum and recent Ofsted maths report. The authors also bring the hardware and software sections of the book right up to date, as well as telling you where to find all the best free resources!


The book reflects the shift in focus to personalized learning and cross-curricular approaches, and suggested answers to the reflective questions peppered throughout the text are featured on the book's dedicated website.


This user-friendly book is the definitive guide to using ICT to teach mathematics, and will be a valuable resource for all secondary school maths teachers and trainees.

What Do University Teachers Think eLearning Is Good for in Their Teaching?

This journal article appeared in the February 2010 issue of Studies in Higher Education (Volume 35, Number 1).

Abstract:

Although numerous studies have been conducted on conceptions of teaching, research extending this investigation into conceptions of teaching using eLearning is rare. This study employed a phenomenographic approach to investigate what university teachers think eLearning is good for in their teaching. Four qualitatively different ways of conceiving of eLearning were discovered: (a) to provide information to students; (b) for occasional communication among unit participants; (c) to engage students in online discussions; and (d) to support knowledge-building tasks. Four dimensions of variation provided a more detailed picture. These were: role of teacher, role of students, unit participants' interaction and perception of embeddedness with face-to-face component. Results are situated in line with those from previous research and indicate an emerging consensus of findings. Academic developers may benefit from these outcomes by using them in designing eLearning support programs. Further studies confirming or challenging previous findings, as well as associating conceptions of eLearning and teaching, are proposed.

Sites We Like ~ DMLcentral.net: digital media and learning: the power of participation

From the their website:

DMLcentral.net is the online presence for the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub located at the systemwide University of California Humanities Research Institute and hosted at the UC Irvine campus. We think digital media practices are fundamentally reshaping society in far-reaching ways, especially in how people all around the world are learning and connecting with one another.


Across the globe, an ever-expanding number of researchers, policy-makers, practitioners, industry, scholars and youth are exploring the boundaries and possibilities of digital media and the networked world of the twenty-first century.

At DMLcentral.net, we want to do all we can to fuel that exploration - to enable break-through collaborations and evoke illuminating conversations that lead to innovations in learning and public participation.


People We Know: Western Appoints New Dean of Education ~ Vicki Schwean

The University of Western Ontario has announced the appointment of Vicki Schwean as Dean of the Faculty of Education, beginning a five-year term on July 1st 2011.


Schwean is presently Vice-Dean (Finance & Academic Administration) in the Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary, where she also holds the position of Interim Associate Dean in the Office of Graduate Programs. Other senior administrative positions Schwean has held include: Associate Dean, Division of Applied Psychology, University of Calgary (2005-2009); Head, Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, University of Saskatchewan (2001-2005); and founder of University of Calgary Applied Psychological and Educational Services, an award-winning clinic.

A registered psychologist, Schwean holds bachelor and masters degrees from the University of Regina in addition to a PhD from the University of Saskatchewan in educational psychology.

News Release: International symposium launches conversation about adolescent male body image and physical education

Here is the news release, distributed nationally, about Michael Kehler's Ottawa symposium:

Recognizing that 60% of high school boys opt out of Physical Education because they don't fit in with their competitive, macho peers, a Western-led gathering of international scholars unveils the 'unspoken' issue of body image among boys.

An International Symposium Speaks the Unspoken: Masculinities, bodies and body images in health education runs June 6-8 in Ottawa. Delegates from various sectors will address reasons why a high number of adolescent boys choose to quietly disengage from healthy life practices, including sports.

Sport and physical recreation are generally considered by public health workers, teachers, academics and policy makers as obvious pathways to good health and wellbeing, especially for young people. But, Western Education professor and Symposium co-host Michael Kehler observes that is not the case for many young boys left on the sidelines, when they don't meet the social attitudes of what it means to 'be a man'.

Traditional forms of sport are grounded in rugged masculine ideologies and place value on being lean, muscular and buff. As a result, some boys not fitting this cultural stereotype don't feel safe enough to participate in gym, because they are teased, alienated or marginalized by their peers.

"It's not so much about not wanting to participate in sports," says Kehler, whose research examines the inter¬sections of health, masculinity and physical activity in secondary schools. "The boys who opt out say they want to play, but don't want to be around dominant and aggressive boys who control the gym or locker room."

Kehler and his Symposium co-hosts, Kevin Wamsley, with Western's Faculty of Health Sciences and Michael Atkinson, with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Physical Education and Health, want to break this cycle through policy changes made within Ontario's education system. Yet, first they must increase awareness of these 'unspoken' body image concerns that silently prohibit a majority of boys from pursuing physical fitness in high school. And, that is what the Ottawa Symposium is designed to do.

"We often hear about body image issues among teenage girls, but this first-ever forum pushes scholars, policy-makers and health agencies to acknowledge male students who want to participate in healthy, active lives in school, but can't because they're overshadowed by more physically intimidating boys," says Kehler, who is confident international dialogue will trigger an overdue response to this under-examined area of research.
"I think we can break the cycle, but first we need to interrupt the cycle by starting the conversation. This is not just about sports, it's a health education concern impacting the future wellbeing of a generation."

Funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), the Symposium is supported by The University of Western Ontario and includes keynote speakers from Canada, the USA and Great Britain.


People We Know: Dr. Michael Kehler

Dr. Michael Kehler is interviewed in the May 26th, 2011 issue of Western News. The article, titled "Boys Left Out of Body Image Conversation" is about Dr. Kehler's research and an upcoming symposium. The article is featured on Page 8.

A quote from the article:

Kehler is confident an international symposium he is co-organizing organizing in Ottawa (June 6-8) will result in an overdue response to a largely under-examined area of research - namely that of body image and health in education. Fellow Western faculty member Kevin Wamsley (Health Sciences) and University of Toronto professor Michael Atkinson join Kehler in organizing the symposium. An International Symposium Speaks the Unspoken: Masculinities, bodies and body images in health education will engage scholars from around the world to engage with the topic and develop a stronger collaborative community.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated with information that is much different from the information appearing in this Education Library Blog - have a look!

eLearning 2.0 and New Literacies: Are Social Practices Lagging Behind?

The September 2010 issue of Interactive Learning Environments (Volume 18, Number 3) is a Special Issue: Towards eLearning 2.0 University - so if you found this article of interest you may want to browse the entire issue online.

Abstract:

While the growing prevalence of Web 2.0 in education opens up exciting opportunities for universities to explore expansive, new literacies practices, concomitantly, it presents unique challenges. Many universities are changing from a content delivery paradigm of eLearning 1.0 to a learner-focused paradigm of eLearning 2.0. In this article, we first articulate the paradigmatic differences between eLearning 1.0 and eLearning 2.0 based on technological, social and epistemological dimensions on which we make the case that current social practices of learning in many universities are not keeping up with the possibilities afforded by the Web 2.0 tools. To illustrate our argument, we draw upon our observations of a course in which tertiary students exhibited a traditional, divide-and-conquer disposition while using wikis. There is little in-depth collaboration leading to higher order meaning making or knowledge building among these students. From these observations, we contend that to realize eLearning 2.0, there is a need to change the social-technological infrastructure in universities, and we discuss the various dimensions in which these changes could be implemented.

New Book: Special Educational Needs: A New Look (Second Edition)

The summary of the second edition of this book is from the publisher's website:

Special Educational Needs: A New Look by Mary Warnock was initially published by the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain in 2005.

In this new edition, Warnock has updated her argument, Brahm Norwich has contributed a counter-argument and Lorella Terzi has provided an introduction and afterword, drawing the two debates together.

The issues debated in this new edition of Special Educational Needs: A New Look include:
The statement of special educational need
The concept of inclusion

Special Educational Needs: A New Look raises issues which will be of interest to all involved in special education and inclusion, including teachers, policy makers and educationalists.

New Book ~ Vygotsky and Special Needs Education: Rethinking Support for Children and Schools

The summary of this new book is from the publisher's website:

After Piaget, Vygotsky is perhaps the most important educational theorist of the twentieth century. Support for schools and pupils with additional needs has been theorised in a number of ways over the last 100 years and much interest has been shown in the development and relevance of Vygotsky's ideas. It is ironic, therefore, that so little has been written about the practical application of such a perspective to the field. This book brings together researchers working in the UK and Denmark to reflect on the benefits to be had from taking such a stance on support for children and schools. The contributors are connected with work that has been done at research centres at the universities of Copenhagen and Bath, both of which enjoy strong reputations for their contributions to cultural historical theory. The contributors pursue issues raised by a post-Vygotskian approach and make important contributions to the development of the fields of policy and practice.

New Book: Digital Games and Learning (print and ebook formats are available)

The summary of this new book is from the publisher's website:

The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and challenges for us. How can gaming and simulation technologies be used to engage learners? How can games be used to motivate, deepen and accelerate learning? How can they be used to greatest effect in learning and teaching? The contributors explore these and many other questions that are vital to our understanding of the paradigm shift from conventional learning environments to learning in games and simulations.

This book is also conveniently available for online students in an ebook format - CLICK HERE FOR THE EBOOK FORMAT.

New Book: The Teaching of Science: 21st Century Perspectives

The summary of this new book is from the publisher's website:

What should citizens know, value, and be able to do in preparation for life and work in the 21st century? In The Teaching of Science: 21st-Century Perspectives, renowned educator Rodger Bybee provides the perfect opportunity for science teachers, administrators, curriculum developers, and science teacher educators to reflect on this question. He encourages readers to think about why they teach science and what is important to teach. Only then can they figure out how to teach science. Using his lectures from NSTA conferences as the foundation for the chapters, Bybee addresses topics such as contemporary challenges in science education, curriculum and instruction, inquiry in science teaching, and the development 21st-century skills. He concludes the book with a discussion of the need for leadership and continued reform in science education.


With his experience as a leader in science education for the past 30 years, Bybee brings the necessary perspective and background to help members of the science education community better understand the challenges and goals of science teaching. The Teaching of Science will prove to be thought-provoking and beneficial reading for all members of the science education community as they seek to help students become informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century.

June 1, 2011

What Makes a Good Story? Supporting Oral Narratives of Young Children From Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

This journal article appears in the Summer 2011 issue of Childhood Education (Volume 87, Number 4).

Opening Paragraphs:

All children come to school with the language and culture of their homes and communities. However, the formal uses of language in schools often favor children who speak in ways that meet teachers' expectations (Corson, 2001). For example, the story structure used by many children can be a mismatch with teachers' expectations, resulting in teacher and child frustration and the inability of some children to demonstrate their linguistic and cognitive skills. To ensure equity, early educators can consider diverse children's narratives from a difference rather than deficit perspective; that is, teachers can view the differences in these narratives as a strength, rather than as an indicator of a child's intrinsic lack of narrative ability. Teachers should seek out ways to support all children's storytelling (Jimenez-Silva, 1996; Jimenez-Silva & McCabe, 1996; McCabe & Bliss, 2003).


In this article, we discuss definitions and characteristics of children's narratives, the importance of young children's narrative skills, and cultural differences as illustrated by two children's example narratives. We demonstrate how knowledge of different types of culture-based story structure and a new pedagogical approach can help early educators support the narratives of young children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Preparing Teacher Candidates to Teach Diverse Student Populations Through Reflective Practice

This journal article appeared in the November 2010 issue of Reflective Practice (Volume 11, Number 5).

Abstract:

This sequential QUAL → qual study examines: Phase 1 how reflective practice was implemented in a diversity course in a teacher education program by one teacher educator, and Phase 2 how two of the teacher candidates implemented reflective practice in their diverse student teaching contexts. Data included observations of the course and the student teaching of two teacher candidates (TCs), interviews of the course instructor, three TCs, and two high school students, as well as analyses of key course assignments. This study concludes: (1) cultivation of a reflective practice in TCs is critical to the teacher preparation process; (2) support for TCs in this process is strengthened when led by an instructor who also engages in reflective practice; and (3) teacher reflection on diversity, assumptions and inequity, with opportunities to transfer these course reflections to their teaching practices is central to preparing teachers to teach diverse student populations.

Situated Performances in a Graduate Teacher Education Course: An Inquiry into the Impact of Cultural and Political Vignettes (CPVs)

This journal article appears in a 2011 issue of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice (Volume 17, Number 3).

Abstract:

This inquiry investigates teachers' perceptions regarding the impact of Cultural and Political Vignettes (CPVs) and situated performance activities in their graduate teacher education course, Literacy Instruction for Diverse Learners, at a large urban university in New York City. The study involved a pedagogical strategy that the author created for use in her own teacher education courses which she terms Cultural and Political Vignettes (CPVs). CPVs are cultural and political situations that are presented to teachers so that they can practice the decision-making skills that they need to use with students, parents, colleagues, and administrators in the diverse classrooms of the New York City public schools. They deal with sensitive cultural and political issues, such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, school politics, sexual preference, and religion and are designed to help teachers to reflect upon their values, ideologies, biases, and educational philosophies. What sets this research apart and makes it of interest to other teacher educators is that although much has been written about the challenge of working with diverse student populations and its impact on the field of teacher education, the majority of the research in this area has focused on the attitudes and lack of knowledge of teachers, rather than pedagogical practices that actually prepare teachers to be successful. The findings of the study suggest that one way in which teacher educators can help beginning teachers view their field as a series of complex and dynamic exchanges between culturally, linguistically, and politically positioned human beings is by having them actively participate in writing activities and situated performances that highlight and unpack these hidden challenges of the teaching profession. This study has implications regarding further research about the use of CPVs and situated performance in teacher education programs. It would be worthwhile to replicate the present study (or modified, improved versions) in other teacher preparation courses and institutions in urban, suburban, and rural areas to see if future participants in a variety of settings find these pedagogical strategies equally effective. Further research in this area will help to address the challenges in teacher education regarding better preparing teachers to deal with cultural and political issues in their classrooms and schools because rather than simply discussing these challenges, these studies will contribute to filling a void in the literature in this area by actually advocating specific pedagogical methods and practices for addressing them.

Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education

These STANDARDS were approved by the ACRL Board of Directors at the Spring Executive Committee Meeting May 11, 2011.

Introduction:

The quickly changing information and technology landscape requires increasingly sophisticated information literacy skills for the navigation, evaluation, and use of information (Jenkins, 2006). Teachers play a key role in providing students with diverse opportunities to learn how to use information wisely.


Those preparing to become pre-kindergarten to twelfth grade (PK-12) teachers require a comprehensive understanding of information literacy to guide their own knowledge creation activities that will ultimately affect their future students. Yet, researchers have shown that future teachers often enter teaching without the necessary information literacy skills and knowledge (Laverty & Reed, 2006).

Experiences in pre-service, graduate, and continuing education programs shape how teachers model and facilitate student learning in their own classrooms. The development of information literacy tools and knowledge is fundamental to teacher education students' abilities to evaluate and use diverse and continually changing information sources in their academic work and pre-service teaching.

Once in their own classrooms, PK-12 teachers model for their students how to critically navigate the current maze of information and how to use information to construct credible arguments. Information literacy competence enables pre-service teachers to develop a robust understanding of the role of information in their lives, and to model information literacy to PK-12 students.

The Librarian is reading...

"The Supreme Sport of Research" by Susan Campbell Bartoletti appearing in the March/April 2011 issue of The Horn Book Magazine (Volume 87, Number 2).

The article begins:

Research is my Extreme Sport--and the closest I'll ever come to being an athlete. Like an extreme sports athlete, I am drawn to challenges. I like pushing limits and taking on increasingly challenging goals. Why?

May 20, 2011

On Identity, Diversity, and Educational Change

This article appears in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of Educational Change (Volume 12, Number 2).

Abstract:

In this article, I discuss two areas of Andy Hargreaves' scholarship, teachers' identity and biography and the three periods of educational change spanning the 1960s to 1990s, that have influenced my work as a teacher educator and researcher. I describe research projects, including self-studies, in which I have examined the influence of teachers' identities and biographies on their beliefs and practices of responding to student diversity. I also explore how the topic of teachers' identity and biography are integrated into the courses I teach. Additionally, I describe how I have related the three periods of educational change--a period of optimism and innovation, a period of complexity and contradiction, and a period of marketization and standardization, along with the monocultural restoration--to corresponding policies and practices of responding to student diversity in the US and Ontario, Canada. Finally, I discuss a current project in which Andy and I are exploring core issues related to educational leadership and diversity.

Educators' Conceptions of Student Diversity in Their Classes

This journal article appeared in the December 2010 issue of Studies in Higher Education (Volume 35, Number 8).


Abstract:

This article reports on an international study investigating university educators' ideas about the diversity of their students, carried out by using semi-structured email interviews. The information obtained from participants was analysed using a phenomenographic approach to obtain an outcome space, in which the narrowest conception ignored any differences between students, the broader conceptions made allowance for such differences, while the most expansive conceptions utilised diversity as an essential pedagogical resource. Educators' ideas are illustrated by quotes from their interview records, and the analysis is situated in the broader debate about the nature and role of difference and diversity in higher education and beyond.

Mentoring Through Reflective Journal Writing: A Qualitative Study by a Mentor/Professor and Two International Graduate Students

This journal article appeared in the July 2010 issue of Reflective Practice (Volume 11, Number 3).

Abstract:

Universities and colleges seek to help all students succeed. However, foreign graduate students experience a different set of challenges than domestic students. Culture shock and writing in a foreign language are just a few examples that threaten their overall success. This qualitative participatory action research study describes and explains how two graduate students and a faculty mentor engaged in mentoring and structured reflective writing activities designed to address these challenges. The research data include a focus group interview, analysis of selected journal pages and conference presentations. Results indicate that reflective journal writing and mentoring help foreign graduate students de-stress, learn the tacit knowledge of the academy and participate in scholarly activities like conference presentations and publishing.

Where are the Generators?

This journal article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts (volume 5, Number 1).

Abstract:

Organizational creativity is presented as four distinctly different sequential stages of a dynamic cognitive creative problem solving process: generation, conceptualization, optimization, and implementation. The generation stage is the activity that initiates the creative process. It is disruptive, because it entails proactively and deliberately seeking and discovering brand new problems and opportunities. Often called opportunity finding, generation results from restless discontent with the status quo. This activity is different from the second stage, conceptualization, which other researchers have previously described as problem construction, identification, or formulation. Such second stage activity gives definition to a newly discovered problem freshly emerging from the first stage or to a presented or otherwise already existing problem. We provide research showing that the people who prefer the generation stage activity (generators) are underrepresented in industrial and business organizations and are likely to be found in occupations normally found outside such organizations, for example, artists, writers, designers, teachers, and academic institutions. We argue that organizations seeking increased creativity and innovation could do so by understanding and recognizing the contributions made by people preferring the generator style, and by making generator activity more attractive for all members of the organization.

Integrating Narrative and Action Processes in Group Counseling Practice: A Multimodal Approach for Helping Clients

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of the Journal for Specialists in Group Work (Volume 36, Number 1).

Abstract:

The aim of this article is to introduce an integrated approach for helping clients. The approach combines and builds on two group-based interventions: guided autobiography and therapeutic enactment. Descriptions of the two interventions individually and a transtheoretical model for change are provided. How change occurs through the proposed approach is described and then illustrated through the presentation of a case study. Characteristics for whom the approach applies, limitations, implications, and research are also discussed.

A Synthesis of Research Concerning Creative Teachers in a Canadian Context

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

Effective teachers are often creative ones, yet an examination of creative teaching is largely invisible in the North American creativity literature. Even within education there is little about teachers' own creative practice. Nonetheless, there are benefits to studying creative teachers: in education it can explicate ways of enhancing teachers' creativity and enriching praxis; and in psychology it can extend our understanding of social and interpersonal creativity, as well as everyday creativity. This paper reviews 12 Canadian case studies of creative teaching conducted by a creative teaching research group. An in-depth elaboration of two themes, creative person and community, is presented.

The Multicultural Teaching Competency Scale: Development and Initial Validation

This journal article appears in the May 2011 issue of Urban Education (Volume 46, Number 3).

Abstract:

This article reports on the development and initial validation of the multidimensional Multicultural Teaching Competency Scale (MTCS). Data from 506 pre- and in-service teachers were collected in three interrelated studies. Exploratory factor analysis results suggested a 16-item, two-factor solution: (a) multicultural teaching skill and (b) multicultural teaching knowledge. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-factor model was a good fit of the data and superior to competing models. The MTCS demonstrated adequate internal consistency and was related in meaningful ways to measures of racism awareness and multicultural teaching attitudes. Participant responses were not associated with social desirability. Implications are discussed.

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May 18, 2011

English Learners: Challenges in Assessment and the Promise of Curriculum-Based Measurement

This journal article appeared in the March- April 2011 issue of Remedial and Special Education (Volume 32, Number 2).

Abstract:

Despite the growing body of research validating the use of curriculum-based measurement, few studies have focused on using this type of assessment with English learners. Proper assessment of English learners is essential for progress monitoring, determining language proficiency, predicting achievement, and identifying students with disabilities. However, because of linguistic and cultural factors, traditional norm-referenced standardized tests of achievement may not be valid for language minority students. In light of these issues, as well as the growing gap in achievement between language minority and language majority students, greater accountability in the education of English learners is needed. This article delineates some of the challenges in the assessment of English learners in schools, reviews studies that have used curriculum-based measurement with English learners, and outlines the usefulness of such an approach as part of a problem-solving model with this population. Limitations and areas for future research related to the use of curriculum-based measurement with English learners are also presented.

Building a Pathway of Optimal Support for English Language Learners in Special Education

This journal articel appeared in the February 2011 issue of Teacher Education & Special Education (Volume 34, Number 1).

Abstract:

Historically, neither a positive nor a supportive relationship existed between the population of students designated English language learners (ELLs) and the field of special education. Children's lack of English proficiency was often misinterpreted as a disability and they were referred for special education, whereas others who actually had a disability were misdiagnosed as lacking English proficiency and denied special education services. This article delineates the many problems experienced by ELL students at the identification/referral, evaluation, and placement phases of special education and describes a set of preservice modules that were designed for special education teacher candidates to learn about and develop strategies for working with students of diverse language backgrounds.

Using the Smart Board in Teaching Social Stories to Students With Autism

This journal article appeared in the March April 2011 issue of Teaching Exceptional Children (Volume 43, Number 4).


Abstract:

The article overviews a teaching method wherein teachers can use interactive whiteboards to develop social skills in students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The approach focuses on the inability of ASD students to comprehend appropriate social behaviors and proposes that modeling behavioral objectives through social stories and visual media can aid in the social development of ASD children. It presents an outline of the steps teachers should use in developing lessons related to specific functional goals for behaviors and also explores how self-modeling by students can aid in their understanding of the desired behaviors.

The Librarian is reading...

"ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" (Draft Copy Released March 2011).

Introduction

The increasing dominance of images and visual media in contemporary culture is changing what it means to be literate in the 21st century. Today's society is highly visual, and visual imagery is no longer supplemental to other forms of information. New digital technologies have made it possible for almost anyone to create and share visual media. Yet the pervasiveness of images and visual media does not necessarily mean that individuals are able to critically view, use, and produce visual content. Individuals must develop these essential skills in order to engage capably in a visually‐oriented society. Visual literacy empowers individuals to participate fully in a visual culture.

Visual Literacy Defined

Visual literacy is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.

May 17, 2011

Narrative Abilities in Monolingual and Dual Language Learning Children with Specific Language Impairment

This article appeared in the November-December issue of Journal of Communication Disorders (Volume 43, Nuumber 6).

Abstract:

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare narrative abilities in children with specific language impairment (SLI) who are monolingual and those who are dual language learners. Method: The participants were 26 children with SLI, 14 monolingual English speakers and 12 dual language learners. The dual language learners were English dominant and spoke a variety of other languages in the home. The two SLI groups were compared using standardized tests and measures from two narrative samples. Results: Compared to the monolingual children, the dual language learners achieved lower scores on standardized tests of morphosyntax but not on measures of language form derived from the narrative samples. Both groups achieved below average scores on productivity, narrative structure, literate language, and language form measures from the narrative samples. Conclusion: The data suggest that narrative samples can be a sensitive way to assess the language skills of dual language learners with specific language impairment. Furthermore, the findings are consistent with the position that English standardized tests may be a biased assessment measure when used with dual language learners, particularly for the assessment of expressive morphosyntactic skills. Learning outcomes: Readers will be able to (1) describe the narrative abilities of typically developing dual language learners; (2) describe similarities between the narrative abilities of children with SLI who are monolingual and dual language learners; (3) identify ways to analyses narratives at a variety of levels.

Report: Teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) Mathematics in Early Childhood

This article appears in the Summer 2011 issue of Childhood Education (Volume 87, Number 4).

From the introductory paragraphs of the report:


According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 47 million people living in the United States spoke a language other than English at home in 2000, representing approximately 18% of the total U.S. population (NCES, 2004). It is expected that these demographics will continue to change, and minorities will become the majority by 2030 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009). Of special interest is the fact that the population of English language learners (ELLs), especially those who are learning English in K-12 school settings, will continue to grow (Chang, 2008). According to an "Issue Brief" by the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF), about 20% of students were identified as an ELL in 2007, and a quarter of those students have difficulty with English (AYPF, 2009). A recent report from the Census Bureau (2009) suggests that one in every four children under the age of 5 in the United States is currently being raised in a home where a language other than English is being spoken.


The major concern of educators who work with ELLs is that these children face many difficulties when entering the U.S. public education system. More specifically, these children tend to fall behind their mainstream counterparts in science, reading, and mathematics (NCES, 2003; U.S. Department of Education, 2001). A vast amount of research conducted in the area identifies several factors associated with ELL underachievement (Capps et al., 2006; Chang, 2008). For instance, sociolinguists have confirmed that ELLs experience difficulties learning a new language and a new set of cultural norms, resulting in poor academic performance (Teranishi, 2004). Mathematics is one of the critical areas in which ELLs have language-associated learning difficulties (Lee & Jung, 2004; Veel, 1999).

Sites We Like: Why Teachers Shouldn't Blog....And Why I Do

Some inspirational words about remembering why and who we teach by Larry Ferlazzo on the Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day......For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL Blog. The name of this particular blog post is "Why Teachers Shouldn't Blog...and Why I Do."


"Sharing, reflecting, challenging, and celebrating -- those are the reasons why I blog...."

New Book ~ Bedtime Stories and Book Reports: Connecting Parent Involvement and Family Literacy

This information is from the publisher's website:

This book brings together the newest research on parent involvement and family literacy--two strands of research that rarely exist in conversation with one another. The discussion highlights how race, class, gender, and history serve as potent factors that shape children's school experiences.

Each chapter offers portraits of real families and schools that illustrate parents' awareness of their children's school progress, their perceptions of teachers, and their involvement in teaching their children life lessons that extend beyond school achievement.

Translating theory into action, this resource:

* Extends conversations about parent involvement and family literacy across time and multiple spaces--home, school, church, and community.


* Challenges accepted notions by listening to parents' counter-stories of how they are involved with their children both in and out of school.


* Highlights the significance of race, class, gender, religion, sexual preference, and history in literacy learning and schooling.

About the Authors/Editors:

Catherine Compton-Lilly is an assistant professor in curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin Madison and the author of Re-Reading Families: The Literate Lives of Urban Children, Four Years Later.


Stuart Greene is associate professor of English at Notre Dame University and co-editor of Making Race Visible: Literacy Research for Racial Understanding.

Sites We Like: Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners (CREATE)

CREATE's focused program of research is designed to address the critical challenge of improving educational outcomes of English-language learners (ELLs) by:

- enhancing the empirical research base for readers in Grades 4-8,


-using both narrative and expository text to develop and test effective interventions that promote content knowledge and language and literacy development,

- investigating the features of instruction and text modifications that facilitate learning for ELLs (e.g., traditional instruction v. ESL-enhanced instruction, teacher guided instruction v. group work, traditional text v. modified text), and

- designing, testing, and delivering professional development that ensures teachers implement effective classroom practices to help ELLs achieve high standards.


The National Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners - A research program funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education

Did They Get It? The Role of Fidelity in Teaching English Learners

This article appeared in the March 2011 issue of the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (Volume 54, Number 6).

Abstract:

The article examines the role of fidelity in literacy education for English learners (ELs). The authors discuss the challenges ELs experience with the use of academic language in school settings as opposed to informal English use in school hallways or outside school. They emphasize the importance of using research-based literacy methods with fidelity in order to improve the student achievement of ELs and help them learn academic English. The effectiveness of the use of specialized instruction in a program funded by the Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of English Language Learners (CREATE) is addressed. Topics include educational intervention, high-quality professional development, and school reform.

May 16, 2011

Embracing the Squishiness of Digital Literacy

This article appears in the April 2011 issue Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (Volume 54, Number 7).

This is the first paragraph of the article:

The thing about digital literacy is its inherent squishiness. Educators argue whether the tool or the purpose matters most. They debate whether something being "electronic" constitutes "digital." Does it need a screen? A keyboard? More than that, teachers must decide what it means to read and write digitally and how to assess those skills. Just as teachers were working to conclusively define literacy, digital literacy arrived on the scene and the discussion started again. In fact, the most solid of ground to be found in the debate surrounding digital literacy is the agreement that, whatever it is, it is important to the success of our students. Even then, not everyone is in agreement. Accepting, temporarily, digital literacy's importance, educators are faced with important questions: What is it? How do I teach it? How do I know if my students have learned it? Finding answers to these questions poses challenges -- challenges, it turns out, worth facing.

Sites We Like: Procrastination Research Group

This web site provides access to information and research related to procrastination. Although our site originates at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada), it represents a compilation of information and research on procrastination from all over the world.

May 11, 2011

The Benefits & Drawbacks of Integrating Cloud Computing and Interactive Whiteboards in Teacher Preparation

This article appears in the May 2011 issue of TechTrends (Volume 55, Number 3).

Abstract:

Twenty-first century technology has changed the way tools are used to support and enhance learning and instruction. Cloud computing and interactive white boards, make it possible for learners to interact, simulate, collaborate, and document learning experiences and real world problem-solving. This article discusses how various technologies (blogs, wikis, GoogleDocs, and interactive white boards) have been used at one private university in teacher preparation courses. Authors discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each tool for students and faculty and how technologies are made user-friendly for learners of different technology ability. Authors highlight tool usage and issues encountered by students and faculty and how the use of these tools can be useful for the students in their careers.

Student-Teacher Interaction on Facebook: What Students Find Appropriate

This article appears in the May 2011 issue of TechTrends (Volume 55, Number 3).

Abstract:

Web 2.0 technologies such as Facebook, a popular social networking site, provide educators with new possibilities for reaching their students. As these technologies are new, there is not a total understanding of how these technologies could best be used in education. This study helps to develop this understanding by investigating how appropriate students find student-teacher interactions on Facebook. The results indicate that students find passive behaviors more appropriate than active behaviors with no difference depending on whether students or teachers perform the behaviors. Additionally, men find student-teacher interactions on Facebook more appropriate than women while no difference exists between undergraduate and graduate students, and age was not related to finding the interactions more or less appropriate.

Internet Anxiety among Foreign Language Learners

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of TechTrends (Volume 55, Number 2).

Abstract:

Little attention has been paid to the demotivating potential of new technologies in foreign language research. Thus, this study aims to investigate Internet anxiety among foreign language learners and to determine the relationships between Internet anxiety and certain variables. A background questionnaire, an Internet information test, and an Internet anxiety scale were administered to a sample group of 115 foreign language learners. The collected data were used to provide a descriptive and correlational analysis. The results of the analysis indicated that the Internet is not in itself an anxiety source among foreign language learners; however, it is the situations in which learners have to use the Internet that provoke Internet anxiety. Furthermore, it was observed that factors such as gender, computer and Internet connection ownership, Internet instruction, Internet familiarity, and information level on the Internet significantly correlated with the level of Internet anxiety. In the light of the findings of the study, some recommendations were noted.

Cell Phones in the Classroom: Are we Dialing up Disaster?

This journal article appeared in the March 2011 issue of TechTrends (Volume 55, Number 2).

Abstract:

Over the last decade there has been a rapid diffusion of cellular technology. Though cell phone use began as a business tool, it has now become part of popular culture. Because of the near ubiquitous presence of cell phone technology among teens in the United States, schools are beginning to explore the use of cell phones as a learning tool. This paper explores the implementation of a pilot program using cell phones in a pre-calculus classroom. Included is a description of the implementation of the pilot, an explanation of several activities that occurred during the pilot, and recommendations of how to work with students who do not own cell phones. The paper concludes with several considerations for the use of cell phones in a high school setting.

Incorporating Podcasting and Blogging into a Core Task for ESOL Teacher Candidates

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 56, Number 3).

Abstract:

Due to innovation and globalization in education, educators of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) are encouraged to use such instructional technologies as podcasting and blogging, but studies on integrating these technologies into assignments are rare. This project revealed how ESOL teacher candidates implement instructional technology skills to help English learners and the teacher candidates' attitudes and processes toward implementing podcasting and blogging as a core assignment. Using qualitative research, five themes emerged: (a) ESOL teacher candidates' attitudes and self-assessments, (b) their implementation of podcasting and blogging, (c) their challenges and rewards, (d) the impact on their professional development, and (e) their own impact on new generations of students, particularly English learners. This discussion highlights ESOL teacher candidates' experiences while learning podcasting and blogging. ESOL teacher candidates, recognizing their future students as a new generation, are highly proactive learners and want very much to be competent and confident in their own teaching.

Towards a Framework for Educational Affordances of Blogs

This journal article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 56, Number 2).

Abstract:

Accompanying the emergence of blog technology as a dominant online publishing paradigm is a growing interest in its educational benefits and applications. This study sets out to develop an empirically grounded framework for educational blogging in the context of teacher education. A working framework was first proposed that highlights four areas: self-expression, self-reflection, social interaction, and reflective dialogue. An exploratory study was then conducted to examine the framework by involving two groups of student teachers during their teaching practice. This study revealed that the salient values of blogs centered on emotionally charged and social-oriented individual expressions as well as self-reflection. The interactive functionality of blogs was used mostly for exchanging social support rather than reflective dialogue. A new dimension--blog-reading--has emerged through the investigation and been added to the original framework. The findings can contribute to a better understanding of the educational values of blogs and their meaningful applications as educational media.

The Impact of Using Blogs on College Students' Reading Comprehension and Learning Motivation

This journal article appeared in the January 2011 issue of Literacy Research and Instruction (Volume 50, Number 1).

Abstract:

Research studies on college reading have been emphasizing the effectiveness of instruction and the correlation of reading performance to college success. Little research has been conducted regarding college developmental readers' preferences for using digital texts to communicate. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether students' reading level will improve if the students have the opportunity to use digital texts with a blogging tool. The researchers worked with 149 college students and 2 instructors to integrate blogs into developmental reading courses. The researchers collected and analyzed both quantitative data and qualitative data. The results indicate that using blogs correlated positively with higher retention rate. The article also describes challenges encountered in this project, and suggests integration strategies for college reading instruction.

Digital Dysfunctions in Primary School: A Pilot Study

This journal article appeared in the January 2011 issue of Computers & Education (Volume 56, Number 1).

Abstract:

Learning often involves complex cognitive and motorical processes, and while most learners cope adequately with these challenges there are always some that struggle. When new kinds of knowledge are introduced there is a possibility that some learners will find this new knowledge hard to acquire, and thus manifest a dysfunction. Today the new knowledge can be found within the digital domain. Some learners need more time and more efforts to master the different aspects of digital literacy, some of these even need special attention from friends, teachers or others. Is it possible that this group of learners is experiencing some kind of dysfunctions? It is likely to think so, there are a variety of different learning dysfunctions related to many learning domains, and when a new domain is established it would not come as a surprise that a new form of dysfunction is discovered. This article seeks to answer the question: "Do digital dysfunctions exist?" The answer is given as indicators more than as solid proof. In this study a group of 144 pupils is reduced through a triangulation of qualitative and quantitative methods, and ends up with three cases where there are obvious lacks of digital literacy without any obvious reason. The study also deals with definitions on "digital literacy", and tries to point out what construct the term "digital literacy" in the study material. This construct is then used for measuring digital literacy. The key findings of the study are: Firstly, indications of digital dysfunctions are found within the sample we studied. Secondly, it strengthens the assumption that digital literacy may be independent of other basic literacies from school subjects like mathematics, reading, writing, and esthetic topics.

A Space Called Home: An Immigrant Adolescent's Digital Literacy Practices

This article appeared in the September 2010 issue of Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (Volume 54, Number 1).

Abstract:

The article examines how an immigrant teenager uses digital literacy practices to construct a sense of self or identity. The discussion focuses on a 15-year-old Caribbean American urban high school student called Zeek and her use of online social networks and webpages to develop and support her identity. Gendered identity, a theory of socially situated literacy, a postcolonial perspective on meaning making in communication, and diasporic youth's collective cultural identification and self-identification are mentioned. The influences of a dominant cultural model on Zeek's ethnocultural identity is noted. The idea of integrating digital literacies into education is mentioned.

Your Personal Learning Network: Professional Development on Demand

This article appeared in the December 2010 issue of Music Educators Journal (Volume 97, Number 2).

Abstract:

Web 2.0 tools and resources can enhance our efficiency and effectiveness as music educators, supporting personal learning networks for ongoing professional growth and development. This article includes (a) an explanation of Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and the use of an RSS reader/aggregator; (b) a discussion of blogs, podcasts, wilds, folksonomies, and other resources that can be subscribed to via RSS, with examples of these media applicable to music teaching and learning highlighted; (c) a list of tools that allow one to search for RSS-enabled content of interest; and (d) instructions for accessing resources to create and develop blogs, podcasts, wikis, and folksonomies.

"Podcast Time": Negotiating Digital Literacies and Communities of Learning in a Middle Years ELL Classroom

This article appeared in the March 2010 issue of the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (Volume 53, Number 6).

Abstract:

Scholars have called for more research on strategies that support ELLs' literacy development in the middle years in particular (Ball, 2002; Hawkins, 2004), and a small but growing body of research has called for such research to focus on the promise and potential of multimodal literacy instruction, particularly digital literacy interventions, to engage middle-years learners in the hard work of developing academic reading and writing skills in English (Alvermann, 2002; Ranker, 2008). Committed to exploring new approaches to meeting the diverse learning needs of their students, Ms. L. and the other grades 6 and 7 teachers at DCS extended their usual curriculum focus on written narrative using pen-and-paper technologies to incorporate spoken word, sound, art, and music in the form of learner-generated podcasts.

Achieving Social Justice Within and Through Higher Education: The Challenge for Critical Pedagogy

This journal article appeared in the October 2010 issue of Teaching in Higher Education (Volume 15, Number 5).

Abstract:

While the term critical pedagogy embraces a range of writers and literature, a common feature of all is a belief that education and society are intrinsically interrelated and that the fundamental purpose of education is to improve social justice. However there are perceptions that critical pedagogy has been more successful in critiquing educational and social practices than in achieving actual change. In this paper I explore two areas that critical pedagogy can address to move beyond critique: the importance of a movement formed by diverse elements, in which difference and disagreement are harnessed to help drive change; and the use of this diversity to direct change at a range of levels. My analysis draws specifically on literature that challenges managerialist assumptions about change as a simple, technical process, focusing instead on the complexities of the social world and the attendant complexities of achieving educational and social change.

The Practice of Dialogue in Critical Pedagogy

This journal article appeared in the November 2010 issue of the Adult Education Quarterly (Volume 60, Number 5).

Abstract:

This paper examines dialogue in the higher education classroom. Instigated by my teaching experiences and the paucity of empirical studies examining dialogue in the higher education classroom, I present a re-examination of data I collected in 1996 for an ethnographic study focusing on the experiences of the participants in an ethnic literature course. I return to this data in order to cast further insight into my own teaching. After discussing the findings of this study--speaking (or not) as a cultural practice and translating dialogue to democracy--I reflect on how these findings inform my own teaching practice as an untenured assistant professor.

The Future of the Image in Critical Pedagogy

This article appeared in the January 2011 issue of Studies in Philosophy and Education (Volume 30, Number 1).

Abstract:

Although there is ample interrogation of advertising/commercial/media culture in critical pedagogy, there is little attention paid to the fine arts and to aesthetic experience. This lacuna is all the more perplexing given Paulo Freire's use of artist Francisco Brenand's illustrations Education for Critical Consciousness . Continuum, New York, 1973) for his culture circles. In this essay I will return to Freire's original description of the relationship between fine art images and conscientizacao in order to map out the future of the image in critical pedagogy. This return to the origin of the use of images in literacy programs will highlight the interdependent nature of word and image but also will demonstrate some of the long standing misconceptions of the way fine art images function in relation to education and politics. In conclusion I will suggest that if images have a future in critical pedagogy, then this future must ultimately move beyond Freire. As an alternative genealogical anchoring point for the development of the aesthetics of critical literacy, I suggest a turn to the work of Jacques Rancière. Through his conceptualization of the "pensive image" as well as the "emancipated spectator" we can begin to understand how the fine art image can work to realize Freire's democratic ideals without relying on Freire's problematic formulation of the image-pedagogy relationship. In conclusion, I suggest that the philosophical model necessary to support critical literacy is not Freire's culture circle so much as Kant's aesthetic community now revitalized via Rancière's own aesthetics of dissensus.

'Coming to a place near you?' The politics and possibilities of a critical pedagogy of place-based education

This article appeared in the February 2011 issue of the Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education (Volume 39, Number 1).

Abstract:

It may seem something of a paradox that in a globalised age where notions of interdependence, interconnectedness and common destinies abound, the 'local', with its diversity of cultures, languages, histories and geographies, continues to exercise a powerful grip on the human imagination. The ties that bind us have global connections but are anchored in a strong sense of locality. This paper explores the theoretical foundations of place-based education (PBE) and considers the merits and limitations of current approaches with particular reference to Australian studies. The authors argue that there is a place for PBE in schools but contend that it must be informed by a far more critical reading of the notions of 'place', 'identity' and 'community'. The implications of pursuing a critical pedagogy of place-based education are discussed with reference to curriculum, pedagogy and teacher education.

May 10, 2011

eBook: Meaning in Action: Constructions, Narratives, and Representations

Summary of this book from the publisher's website:

Traditional psychology has long been concerned with cognition, motivation, emotion, and the mind in general.

The mind being held responsible for individual behavior in society and scholars of social and cultural psychology have worked in relative isolation. Meaning in Action is a bold departure as it places culture at the center of human functioning and posits that it is not the independent mind that gives rise to human action but participation in a world of socially created meanings. Each chapter illuminates the socially grounded view of the individual. Investigations into the power of shared meanings, norms, and moralities in everyday life, as well as individual and social narratives, point to their pivotal significance in human relationships. Among other topics, it provides new insights into forgiveness, infant adoption, trauma, supranational identity, and prejudice. The book offers an alternative to the widely dominant vision of psychological functioning and draws on a wide variety of current movements to present a deeply challenging and globally integrative view of human behavior.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated with trending education-related news stories, press releases with links to newly released research reports, current information about technology, digital and media education trends as well as links to new resources added to the Education Library collection.

The content of the Education Library's Facebook page is significantly different from the content of this blog so educational researchers will benefit from reading both the FB page and the blog. Enjoy!

Preparing Early Childhood Teachers for English Language Learners

This article appears in the most current 2011 issue of the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education (Volume 32, Number 2)

Abstract:
Children whose native language is one other than English face formidable challenges when they enter English-dominant schools. The task of learning English, progressing in one's native language, and acculturating to the school environment is a complicated one that requires the child to develop many new skills. In the past, children who were English Language Learners (ELLs) encountered a school system that offered little support. New teachers who enter the workforce must now know how to help these children move successfully into the school setting and learn English at the same time. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of change that occurred during the first year of a professional development grant aimed at infusing English Language Learner (ELL) competencies within an early childhood higher education teacher preparation program. A process is described that helped the faculty move from an awareness level to one that embraced a system to integrate ELL skill development within their coursework.

Reflection through Narrative: The Power of Narrative Inquiry in Early Childhood Teacher Education

This article appears in the 2010 issue of the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education (Volume 31, Number 3). This issue is a "Special Issue: Early Childhood Teacher Educator Research."

Abstract:

This article discusses the value of narrative for conceptualizing and promoting teacher research and inquiry in early childhood teacher education. The article provides an overview of essential forms and functions of narrative, paying particular attention to the contributions of narrative inquiry, which is a research framework rarely applied to early childhood education. In this discussion, we provide illustrative examples of our teaching and research with early childhood teacher researchers applying elements of narrative at the graduate level. These narrative-in-action examples are drawn from the second author's inquiry collaboration with teachers in the rural Midwest and the first author's teaching of an MA level course on narrative inquiry and memoir in a metropolitan area in northern California.

Knitting Teacher: A Narrative Inquiry of a Researcher Who Has Been Researched

This journal article (by Western faculty member, Rachel Heydon) appeared in the February 2010 issue of Qualitative Inquiry (Volume 16, Number 2).

Abstract:

From the vantages of a teacher who has been researched and an educational researcher who has researched teachers, this inquiry constructs a knitted narrative from journals, letters, and stories written about my time teaching English studies in a remote First Nations' community and articles written about me when I was a research participant in a study concerning White women teaching in the Canadian north. The goal of this narrative inquiry is to explore the ethical and methodological issues, including issues around representation, which arise during the course of studying and writing about other people, particularly teachers who are doing border work.

Narrative Inquiry in Service Learning Contexts: Possibilities for Learning about Diversity in Teacher Education

This journal article appeared in the July 2010 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 26, Number 5).

Abstract:

This paper explores the experiences of pre- and in-service teachers through intentionally created narrative inquiry (Connelly & Clandinin, 2006) spaces within three different service-learning engagements in Canada, Kenya, and Turkey. Because the contexts where our studies were situated were culturally different from participants' backgrounds, narrative inquiry spaces shaped windows in which participants could restory their understandings of others different from themselves. We argue thinking narratively suits the purpose of learning within service learning, highlighting the potential this kind of work holds for pre- and in-service teachers' professional identities in school contexts shaped by diversity.

Tuning Frequencies of Multicultural Education Objectives to Distinct Society Perspectives: Two Teacher Candidate Interviews Transmitted through Narrative Inquiry

This journal article appeared in the August 2010 issue of Intercultural Education (Volume 21, Number 4).

Abstract:

Through a qualitative approach of narrative inquiry, this paper examines how Quebec's distinct society identity interacted with objectives of a Multicultural Education course in Montreal. The authors, one of whom was a teaching assistant in the course and the other a student in the course, interviewed seven students and the professor. The reasonable accommodation debates on how best to integrate Quebec immigrants into a society steeped in distinct society narratives were the backdrop to both the course and the research. This paper contributes to the growing research on how teacher candidates negotiate multicultural education programme objectives. Based on our analysis of two participants' interviews we advocate for a more context-based approach with course content specific to the distinct society element in multicultural courses.

Scanning the Landscape of Narrative Inquiry

This journal article appeared in the September 2010 issue of Social and Personality Psychology Compass (Volume 4, Number 9).

Abstract:

Narrative inquiry in psychology has become a richly hued endeavor with multiple and significant implications for social and personality investigation. Such inquiry first represents an important venue for dialogue between psychologists and scholars from across the social sciences and humanities. Furthermore, the focus on narrative invigorates concern with the sociocultural context of human action. This article reviews some of the major lines of inquiry in narrative psychology. The narrative structuring of reality, the achievement of narrative intelligibility in conversation, and the function of narrative in individual life experiences, all receive attention. This review also reveals how narrative inquiry has added importantly to social and personality psychology in its enhancement of critical sensitivities, methodological tools, and investments in social action.

Visualizing Community: Understanding Narrative Inquiry as Action Research

This journal article appears in the December 2010 issue of Educational Action Research (Volume 18, Number 4).

Abstract:

Throughout the school year I invited children in a Grade Two/Three learning strategies classroom to participate in a visual narrative inquiry. The intention was to explore children's knowledge of community in artful ways; the children photographed and wrote in what was often an iterative process, where writing/ talking and photographing intermingled. One of the interim research texts was the creation of an alphabet book. During this process the children envisioned images they wanted to photograph, photographed them using a medium format camera, altered the negatives through scratching and writing, and subsequently developed the images in the darkroom. Throughout the project the children and I engaged in sustained conversations and during this process they became (co-)researchers into their own and each other's understanding of community. During the creation of the alphabet book the children often resisted placing words alongside the images as they were afraid that they would limit the possible interpretations of their images; they wanted the viewer to respond to their images and imagination. Each photograph entailed a desire to understand community in relation and as lived experience. Learning to know a community and creating a vision of community were central elements in the children's visual narratives.

Finding a Home Abroad with "Eveline": Using Narrative Inquiry to Establish a Sense of Place for a Western Teacher in a Foreign and Multicultural Context

This article appears in the February 2011 issue of the Journal of Studies in International Education (Volume 15, Number 1).

Abstract:

This is the exposition of a Western teacher working abroad in Thailand and his coming to terms with what it means to find a home and a sense of belonging while learning to teach in an unfamiliar land and culture. A foreign teacher finds himself isolated between feelings of perceived power (as an educated Westerner) and his all too real feelings of apprehension (as a cultural outsider in a Thai classroom) without feeling grounded in a unified place to call home. The author combines narrative inquiry along with theoretical formulations using the instrument of story to create a dynamic and sensuous space while at the same time proposing a more sophisticated multicultural approach to International Education.

Inclusion or Exclusion?: A Narrative Inquiry of a Language Teacher's Identity Experience in the 'New Work Order' of Competing Pedagogies

This journal article appears in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper investigates how an EFL teacher negotiates her identity to adapt to the 'new work order' in an English education department at a university in China. From a narrative inquiry perspective, it aims to illuminate the complexity of teacher identity in the context of a reform where teachers must reconcile conflicting selves in order to contend with a workplace in which liberal and traditional pedagogies coexist. The findings show that teachers need to shift their identities to survive change. Exclusion from the workplace community of practice can be seen as an alternative form of participation in the reform practices.

May 9, 2011

Ontario College of Teachers Issues Advisory on the Use of Electronic Communication and Social Media

From the News Release:

The simple message for Ontario certified teachers is this: "Represent yourself in social media the same way you would in person,'' says College of Teachers Registrar Michael Salvatori, OCT of a professional advisory to the College's 230,000 members.

The advisory offers advice to teachers on how best to use electronic communication and social media with students. It encourages the use of social media as a teaching tool but cautions teachers to be careful when using sites like Facebook.

"In the current education milieu, e-communication and social media do and will continue to offer engaging and exciting teaching and learning experiences for students and teachers. Their use should be encouraged," says the Registrar. "We want to alert members to its potential risks and provide guidance for its responsible, professional use."

The teaching profession's ethical standards and standards of practice provide the foundation for the College's advice.

"Our advice to teachers is to keep ethical standards - care, trust, respect and integrity - in line of sight," says College Chair Liz Papadopoulos, OCT. "As teachers and educators, we model professionalism and responsibility for our students in both the real world and the virtual world."

It's the College's role as a professional regulator to provide advice to its members from time to time on emerging issues or in response to member questions on aspects of teaching that will continue to advance the profession and the public's confidence in it.

More information: Backgrounder, Advisory on the Use of Electronic Communication and Social Media, Video (incorporates clips from teachers and social media experts)

Are New Faculty At-Risk of "Letting Themselves Go" Due to the Demands of their Profession?

This article appears in the May 2011 issue of Academic Matters:

Are Faculty Members at Risk?

For many, the allure of becoming a professor is the promise of a career that involves freedom of choice, national funding, opportunities for promotion, secured tenure-track advancement, and a flexible work schedule. It is no secret, however, that the path to becoming an established professor requires years of grueling, all-consuming service to prove oneself as worthy.


Assistant professors, those who have recently entered the academic profession, aim to reach tenure by spending countless hours teaching, marking, grant writing, publishing, reading, analyzing, recruiting, and presenting. Most of these "rookies" are also juggling relationships, families, and other personal goals. The reward is that once tenure status is granted, life as a professor can be absolutely wonderful. Or so we think. What if the pressure, expectations, and stress endured while trying to obtain a tenure-track position had devastating consequences on your long-term physical and emotional health?

We have spent the last year investigating the impact of entering an academic profession on the physical-activity behaviour among newly appointed Canadian faculty. This study was the first of its kind to be conducted in Canada.

The Librarian is reading...

OCLC's newest membership report, Perceptions of Libraries, 2010, a sequel to the 2005 Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources, is now available.


The new report provides updated information and new insights into information consumers and their online habits, preferences, and perceptions.


Particular attention was paid to how the current economic downturn has affected the information-seeking behaviors and how those changes are reflected in the use and perception of libraries.

This new OCLC membership report explores:

* Technological and economic shifts since 2005
* Lifestyle changes Americans have made during the recession, including increased use of the library and other online resources
* How a negative change to employment status impacts use and perceptions of the library
* Perceptions of libraries and information resources based on life stage

The report is based on U.S. data from an online survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of OCLC. OCLC analyzed and summarized the results in order to produce this report.

OCLC is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs. More than 72,000 libraries in 170 countries and territories around the world have used OCLC services to locate, acquire, catalog, lend and preserve library materials.

Fraser Institute: The Report Card on Ontario's Secondary Schools 2011

The Report Card on Ontario's Secondary Schools 2011 collects a variety of relevant, objective indicators of school performance into one, easily accessible public document so that anyone can analyze and compare the performance of individual schools. By doing so, the Report Card assists parents when they choose a school for their children and encourages and assists all those seeking to improve their schools.

May 5, 2011

A University Program with "The Whole World as a Focus": An Icelandic Response to Globalization

This journal article appears in the April 2011 issue of Innovative Higher Education (Volume 36, Number 2).

Abstract:

The International Studies in Education program at the University of Iceland illustrates how one university is responding to global trends in higher education. Through a case study we examined the significance of an innovative B.A. program, which is taught in English, aligned with values affirmed in critical multiculturalist scholarship, and designed to respond to demographic changes including a sharp increase in Iceland's immigrant population. The experience of students, teachers, and administrators raises important questions about institutional responsibilities, both local and global; about the role of English in an international studies program; about "de facto" segregation of students; and about the significance of local context in global trends in higher education.

New Book: Global Crises, Social Justice, and Education

Description of this book is from the publisher's website:

Education cannot be understood today without recognizing that nearly all educational policies and practices are strongly influenced by an increasingly integrated international economy. Reforms in one country have significant effects in others, just as immigration and population tides from one area to another have tremendous impacts on what counts as official knowledge and responsive and effective education. But what are the realities of these global crises that so many people are experiencing and how do their effects on education resonate throughout the world?

Global Crises, Social Justice, and Education looks into the ways we understand globalization and education by getting specific about what committed educators can do to counter the relations of dominance and subordination around the world.

From some of the world's leading critical educators and activists, this timely new collection provides thorough and detailed analyses of four specific centers of global crisis: the United States, Japan, Israel/Palestine, and Mexico. Each chapter engages in a powerful and critical analysis of what exactly is occurring in these regions and counters with an equally compelling critical portrayal of the educational work being done to interrupt global dominance and subordination.


Without settling for vague ideas or romantic slogans of hope, Global Crises, Social Justice, and Education offers real, concrete examples and strategies that will contribute to ongoing movements and counter-hegemonic struggles already active in education today.

New Book: Globalizing Education Policy

"In Globalizing Education Policy, the authors explore the key global drivers of policy change in education, and suggest that these do not operate in the same way in all nation-states. They examine the transformative effects of globalization on the discursive terrain within which educational policies are developed and enacted, arguing that this terrain is increasingly informed by a range of neo-liberal precepts which have fundamentally changed the ways in which we think about educational governance. They also suggest that whilst in some countries these precepts are resisted, to some extent, they have nonetheless become hegemonic, and provide an overview of some critical issues in educational policy to which this hegemonic view of globalization has given rise."

Schooling Internationally: Globalisation, Internationalisation, and the Future for International Schools

Description of the book from the publisher's website:

The number of schools that call themselves international is growing exponentially. In addition many other schools are exploring the concept of international-mindedness and what that might mean in the contemporary world of globalisation.


This book sets out to provide a critical perspective on current issues facing 'international schooling', particularly the conflict between 'internationalising' and 'globalising' tendencies and to explore these as they affect teaching and learning, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment as well as to explore the contribution international schools might make to the achievement of global citizenship.


It is the first book to critically analyse the ambiguities, tensions and conflicts that face those involved with and researching, international schools and their role in global networking. Issues addressed include:

* the political economy of international schools (Hugh Lauder and Ceri Brown)
* their relations to global and local cultures, global markets and civil society (Richard Bates)
* the role of international schools in global networking (Michael Wylie) ?
* the micropolitics of such schools (Richard Caffyn)
* the growth complexity and challenges facing the International Baccalaureate (Tristan Bunnell)
* the future demands for and of teachers in international schools (Mary Hayden and Jeff Thompson)
* the nature of teaching and learning in international schools (Helen Fail)
* the problematic idea of an international curriculum (Jim Cambridge)
* issues facing international assessment (Richard Bates)
* the challenge of education for global citizenship (Harriet Marshall).

This provocative book
will be essential reading for those teaching in, leading and governing international schools.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is regularly updated with trending education-related news stories, newly released research reports, current information about technology, digital and media education as well as links to new resources added to the Education Library collection.

The content of the Education Library's Facebook page is significantly different from the content of this blog so educational researchers will benefit from reading both the FB page and the blog. Enjoy!

New Book: Curriculum Development: A Guide to Practice (Eighth Edition)

Description of the book from the publisher's website:

A highly regarded curriculum development text, now with a global approach and an increased focus on technology.

In this re-imagined eighth edition of the respected and seminal curriculum development textbook, seasoned authors Jon Wiles and Joseph Bondi consider the new global realities of the 21st Century by adding a unique global perspective to the process of curriculum development.


Ten nations are analyzed and compared in order to better understand common threads and time-tested methods for curriculum development and management. With the aid of numerous features and activities, the text investigates curriculum development by examining value decisions made by leaders in defining education, giving readers the opportunity to learn to develop programs for a wide array of purposes.

In addition to its well-known and established focus on the historical and philosophical aspects of curriculum development, the revised eighth edition of Curriculum Development: A Guide To Practice also includes updated chapters on the impact of technology on curriculum work in schools as well as a new chapter on curriculum work in the classroom.

Literacy in a Global, Digital Age

This article appears in the March 2011 issue of ETFO's Voice (Volume 13, Number 3).

On Literature's Use(ful/less)ness: Reconceptualizing the Literature Curriculum in the Age of Globalization

This article appeared in the February 2011 issue of the Journal of Curriculum Studies (Volume 43, Number 1).

Abstract:

This paper begins by examining how debates about literature's usefulness or, more specifically, its uselessness, have been framed in terms of the binary between utilitarianism and pragmatism on the one hand, and between humanism and idealism on the other. Instead of conceiving the literature curriculum in terms of a position one privileges in a binary structure, the question is whether the curriculum may be conceptualized as a hybrid space incorporating both values of utilitarianism and humanism, pragmatism, and idealism. The first part of the paper explores the hybrid nature of the literature curriculum that is framed by the paradox of its usefulness and uselessness. The second part of the paper shows how this hybridity is at present compromised by World and Global Literature curricula models and argues for a reconceptualization of the curriculum through the model of a Cosmopolitan Literature curriculum. This study shows how such a curriculum would adequately prepare students for global labour markets where they are expected to be mobile, to be able to shift among different communities, and to communicate with diverse groups by cultivating dispositions related to cosmopolitan curiosity, openness, and empathy towards others.

Reading Graphically: Comics and Graphic Novels for Readers from Kindergarten through High School

The journal article appears in the January/February 2011 issue of Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts (Volume 50, Number 4).

Summary:

The article presents examples of comics and graphic novels for readers from kindergarten through high school. It notes that these books demonstrate the changes in literature over the past 50 years ending in 2011. It outlines the genre of these literature from comic books to novels and non-fiction research. It projects that readers will find books which are interesting to read and enjoy through their visual images.

Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (JAAL)

The April 2011 issue of the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy (Volume 54, Number 7) has a number of interesting articles:

Digital Literacies ~ Embracing the Squishiness of Digital Literacy

Real-time Teaching ~ A Social Justice Approach as a Base for Teaching Writing

"Aren't These Boy Books?: High School Students' Readings of Gender in Graphic Novels

On the Cusp of Cyberspace: Adolescents' Online Text Use in Conversations

Mountains and Pit Bulls: Students' Metaphors for College Transitional Reading and Writing

Are We Postmodern Yet? Reading Monster With 21st Century Ninth Graders

You Need to Realize It In Yourself: Positioning, Improvisation, and Literacy

Beyond "Is This OK?": High School Writers Building Understanding of Genre

Storytelling and Cultural Connections: Canada's "intellectual can of Red Bull," Jeremy Gutsche at Canada 3.0

From the Canada 3.0 Be the Future website:

Canada's "intellectual can of Red Bull," Jeremy Gutsche from TrendHunter.com was the first guest speaker during the morning session of Canada 3.0. The key focus of his presentation was around the idea that brands need to prioritize the development of cool, trending products rather than simply focus on the most current, popular products. In other words, companies (and Canada as a digital nation) need to look for "upcoming trends" and continue to experiment in order to stay competitive and relevant to consumers.


Gutsche said that many successful companies are actually developed in times of economic chaos. That's because people see an emerging trend and develop a solution to meet an important consumer need at that time. A great example of this is Canadian-based company Community Lend, which provides group advanced loans for consumers who need to consolidate their debt.

Once you are ahead of trends and are developing the right products, Gutsche told the audience that it is very important to make a cultural connection with your customers. "When people perceive your brand as part of their team, they want you to win," said Gutsche.

Again, this was a very important message for all of the delegates at the conference. Canada will rally behind the development of a digital society and economy if they are made to feel part of the team. Canada 3.0 is just the starting point for building that sense of camaraderie.

Gutsche explained that the best way to connect with your audience on a cultural level is through relentless obsession with your story.

He offered three key rules for telling a winning story: it must be simple, direct and supercharged. He said that if you cannot tell your story in seven words or less, then your audience will not be able to repeat it for you via social media and word of mouth.

Digital Literacy Skills Critical to Youth Civic Engagement

This information is from the MNet website:

Media Awareness Network (MNet), Canada's leading media literacy and digital literacy organization, launched in March 2011 "From Consumer to Citizen: Digital Media and Youth Civic Engagement," a discussion paper outlining the important role digital literacy plays in ensuring youth become competent and engaged civic and political actors.

"In today's digital world, civic and political bodies are racing to establish a presence online and a great many political actions now occur in virtual spaces," said Jane Tallim, Co-Executive Director of MNet. "In our report we encourage educators to examine digital literacy skills development as a means for children and youth to positively and actively engage in civic and political life."

The brief focuses on the impact media, particularly interactive technology, has on children and youth's involvement in civics and politics. It looks at the current state of youth and civic engagement and includes a list of recommendations to help educators foster and support youth civic engagement in a digital world.

"Long term political attitudes which affect adult civic behaviour (in both voting and other forms of engagement) are shaped from a young age, so youth apathy must be addressed years before the age of 18. In our schools, however, civics programs are not keeping pace with the rapidly expanding online opportunities for civic engagement that are available to young people," said Ms. Tallim.

Among the many recommendations, MNet invites educators to consider the potential downsides of limiting access at school to certain online environments such as social networking sites, asking educators to see these sites as effective tools to circulate petitions, display affiliations, join causes, and invite others to get involved.

For a comprehensive list of MNet's recommendations and a complete copy of "From Consumer to Citizen: Digital Media and Youth Civic Engagement" visit the MNet website.

Media Awareness Network (MNet) is a Canadian not-for-profit centre for media literacy and digital literacy. Its vision is that young people have the critical thinking skills to engage with media as active and informed digital citizens. MNet's programs are funded by its public and private sector sponsors, donors and partners, who include: CTV • Shaw • TELUS • Bell • Canadian Internet Registration Authority • Google • National Film Board of Canada • Government of Canada.

New Book: Multimodal Literacy: Researching Classroom Practice

Author of this book, Dr. Maureen Walsh is Professor of Literacy Education and Assistant Head of the School of Education NSW at ACU. Her position at Australian Catholic University (ACU) has included research project management, doctoral supervision, course coordination, course development and lecturing in Literacy Education, English Curriculum and TESOL in undergraduate and postgraduate courses, including diploma and degree courses for Aboriginal and Torres Islander students.

New Book: Re-Framing Literacy: Teaching and Learning in English and the Language Arts

Description from the publisher's website:

Imaginative and attractive, cutting edge in its conception, this text explicates a model for the integration of language arts and literacy education based on the notion of framing.


The act of framing - not frames in themselves - provides a creative and critical approach to English as a subject. Re-framing Literacy breaks new ground in the language arts/literacy field, integrating arts-based and sociologically based conceptions of the subject. The theory of rhetoric the book describes and which provides its overarching theory is dialogic, political, and liberating.

Pedagogically, the text works inductively, from examples up toward theory: starting with visuals and moving back and forth between text and image; exploring multimodality; and engaging in the transformations of text and image that are at the heart of learning in English and the language arts.

Structured like a teaching course, it is designed to excite and involve readers and lead them toward high-level and useful theory in the field.

Offering an authoritative, clear guide to a complex field, it is widely appropriate for pre-service and in-service courses globally in English and language arts education.

New Book: Cases of Successful Literacy Teachers

Using teaching vignettes, cases for exploration, and research in the field, this text provides teachers with effective, research-based literacy strategies they can use to improve their practice with students from diverse backgrounds. The cases - drawn from urban, rural, and suburban settings - allow teachers to make connections between classroom challenges and the research literature that can help them become problem solvers and reflective practitioners.

Getting Started: Personalized Research Consultations Will Help You with Your Literature Review

We strongly suggest that graduate students book a research consultation appointment with one of the academic librarians. This one hour meeting is a personalized and customized information session about database searching for your particular area of research interest, and strategies for conducting a literature reveiw. We try to accommodate your schedule when setting up these meetings, so give us a call and arrange an appointment time. If you are an online student, we can arrange to provide this assistance via email.

Getting Started: Choosing a Research Database - Use the Databases by Title List

It is easy to get started with searching the research databases to find scholarly journal articles.

Go to the Western Libraries' website.

If you are working off campus, please type in your Western user name and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' web site. Login HELP is available.

Click on the option "Databases by Title"

Select one of the databases you want to search.

For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian education research information), ERIC or PsychInfo or Proquest Education Journals to get started on your research.

Helpful Hints for Searching the Research Databases:

Like the CLASSIC search option of the online catalogue, databases are "keyword friendly".

Keywords and search terms can be combined in a variety of ways to refine your search to get the most relevant journal articles in the most efficient manner.

You can also search the databases by author's name and by journal title. This makes searching for your particular research topic much more efficient, and allows for flexible searching for information about your research topic.


New Book: Issues and Trends in Literacy Education (Fifth Edition)

Description from the publisher's web site:

In Issues and Trends in Literacy Education (Fifth Edition), well-respected authors Dick Robinson Mike McKenna, and Kristin Conradi pull together the research and opinions of some of today's leading literacy educators to give readers an authoritative look at all crucial aspects of reading and writing education. This edition is completely revised to include all new, current articles and readings, including new chapters on English language learners and technology, and the scrupulously researched material meets the NCATE/International Reading Association requirements for accreditation of graduate reading programs.

My favourite chapter:

Chapter 8 Technology
21st-Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief National Council of Teachers of English - Rethinking Online Reading Assessment written by Julie Coiro.

The Librarian is reading...

Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-class Children in Their Own Self-Interest (Second Edition) by Patrick J. Finn


Summary from the publisher's page:

A comprehensive update of the classic study that delivers both a passionate plea and strategies for teachers, parents, and community organizers to give working-class children the same type of empowering education and powerful literacy skills that the children of upper- and middle-class people receive.


The classic, indispensable guide for teachers, parents, and community organizers concerned with educating working-class children, Literacy with an Attitude dares to define literacy as a powerful right of citizenship. Patrick J. Finn persuasively debunks the time-honored paradigm for teaching poor and working-class students. Our job, he argues, is not to help such students to become middle class and live middle-class lives--most don't want it. Education rather should focus on a powerful literacy--a literacy with an attitude--that enables working-class and poor students to better understand, demand, and protect their civil, political, and social rights.

This tenth-anniversary, second edition features eight new chapters and a new appendix, and a revised and updated original text.

May 2, 2011

New Term Begins - May 2, 2011 ~ Welcome or Welcome Back!

Welcome (or welcome back) to all of the Intersession and Summer Online graduate students here at the Faculty of Education who begin their new term today.

The blog entries below labelled "Getting Started" will introduce you to our main research databases and library services.

Please contact the Education Library's academic librarians (Christena and Denise) if you would like to arrange a personalized research consultation to assist you with your specific research interests.

Good luck with your courses, assignments and research.

April 29, 2011

Timely New Book: Does Your Vote Count?: Critical Pedagogy and Democracy

Summary:

The public debate on democracy is often constrained within an alienating and disenfranchising narrative of opinion polls, campaign platforms, personalities and formal structures that generate legislation, all of which surreptitiously seems to trickle down to the classroom. Paul R. Carr asserts that democracy must be cultivated in a vigorous, conscientious, meaningful and critical way in and through education in order for it to have salience in society, especially within a neoliberal conjuncture that promotes limited space for epistemological interrogation of how we understand and are engaged in maintaining and/or transforming our societies. Building on the critical pedagogical work of Paulo Freire, Joe L. Kincheloe, and others, this book develops a framework for understanding how a thicker democratic education can be conceptualized and implemented in schools. The book aims to move the focus on democracy away from voting, and place it more properly on the importance of social justice and political literacy as a way of understanding what democracy is and, importantly, how to make it more relevant for all of society. The book concludes that another democracy is possible, as well as being desirable, and that education is the fundamental intersection in which it must be developed.

About the Author:

Paul R. Carr is Associate Professor in the Departments of Sociology and Interdisciplinary Studies at Lakehead University (Orillia). His research is broadly concerned with social justice, with specific threads related to democracy, critical pedagogy, media literacy and peace studies. He has four co-edited books, examining Whiteness, democratic education, youth culture and intercultural relations, respectively. His book with Darren Lund, The Great White North? Exploring Whiteness, Privilege and Identity in Education, won two awards (Canadian Race Relations Foundation, and the Canadian Association for Foundations of Education). He has a blog at the Paulo and Nita Freire International Center for Critical Pedagogy at McGill University on the theme of democracy, where he is also a Research Associate

Off-Campus Access has been restored

All of the research resources are again available to off-campus users.

April 28, 2011

Downtime: Off-Campus Access - Currently Unavailable

Off-Campus Access is currently unavailable, meaning many online library resources are not accessible from off-campus.

Staff are working to fix the problem.

Updates on this service interruption will be posted to the news area of the library website as more information becomes available. Check the website for further updates.

As a result of this service disruption, it is currently not possible to use many online library resources from off-campus.

These resources are available for those using the library on-campus.

Western Libraries apologizes for any inconvenience this interruption in access may cause our users and thank you for your patience while we diagnose and fix the problem.

April 27, 2011

MOE NEWS: Government Supporting Clean Schools, Building Clean Energy Economy (April 2011)

This information is from an Ontario Ministry of Education News Release (April 2011):


This fall, 126 schools will be turning on more cleaner and renewable sources of power, like solar, wind and geothermal, creating cleaner and more sustainable places to learn for Ontario students.


Using renewable energy will help schools reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, save money on energy costs or earn revenue by selling electricity back to the grid. Schools and boards will reinvest savings and revenue to support improved student achievement and success.

MOE NEWS: McGuinty Government Expands Popular High School Programs (April 2011)

From an Ontario Ministry of Education News Release (April 2011):

For the fifth year in a row, Ontario is expanding the Specialist High Skills Major programs to help students graduate and find their passion in the workforce.


Starting September 2011, students will have access to over 1,300 Specialist High Skills Major programs -- an increase from 1,000 this year. This expansion will ensure more than 34,000 high school students are able to participate next year -- an increase of 6,000 students.

Specialist High Skills Majors encourage students to develop their skills and interests and help put them on the path to a successful career. Through these programs, students earn credits while developing the skills needed for college, university, apprenticeship or the workplace. These programs engage students and are helping to increase high school graduation rates across the province.

Getting Started: Education Related Databases ~ Use these to find scholarly journal articles

All of the databases available to Western students, staff and faculty members are listed on the Databases by Title list on the Western Libraries' website. You must have a UWO username and password to use these research databases.

The Databases by Title list (found on the far left hand side of the web site) is an alphabetical list of all of the research databases that are can be search when looking for scholarly research information for your assignments and thesis work.

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Of course, since the field of education is so multi-disciplinary it is necessary to search other subject databases on the Databases by Title list (e.g., Dissertations and Theses or PsycINFO)

Getting Started: Introduction to Interlibrary Loan (ILL)/RACER Services

The Interlibrary Loan (ILL) service supports the research and scholarship needs of the Western community by attempting to borrow materials not owned by Western Libraries.

RACER is an online Interlibrary Loan system used to search for material and place requests. There is a one-time registration required before you can submit interlibrary loan / document delivery requests.

To access RACER you must fill in a registration form and create an account.

Read this before creating your RACER account: Please keep in mind that your University ID number is used as your login and your password is created by you.

Getting Started: Introduction to RefWorks

RefWorks is web-based bibliographic citation management software that is licensed for Western students, faculty and staff. With this tool you can save, search and format references you find in databases, catalogue searches, and on web sites.

Our colleagues at the Allyn & Betty Taylor Library on main campus have created a HELP page for getting started with RefWorks. We thank them for their diligent work and their willingness to share their wealth of knowledge.

This tutorial will cover setting up a RefWorks account, importing from databases, creating manual references, formatting bibliographies, and more.


Here is the link to the Taylor Library's "Introduction to RefWorks" Help Page.

Getting Started: Electronic Document Delivery (EDD) ~ Have Journal Articles Delivered to Your Desktop

Electronic Document Delivery (EDD) of journal articles housed in the Archives and Research Collection Centre (ARCC) and the Research Depository Library (RDL) is available.

Upon request, journal articles located in these closed stack facilities are sent directly to your desktop as a convenient PDF.



Getting Started: Program Guides Link on the Western Libraries' Website

You will see the Program Guides link on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website. It is listed under the heading Research Tools.

When you click on the Program Guides link you will get a list of all of Western programs with a link to librarian-created program guides to help you get started with your research in your particular program.

The Education Library Program Guides provide you with a starting place for finding information for your assignments and research.

We have three Program Guides:

* Bachelor and Diploma in Education
* Continuing Teacher Education
* Education Graduate Program



Getting Started: The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success

The book "The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success" is a clear, understandable six-step method for streamlining the literature review process! Click on the title link above to find the call number and the circulation status (is it signed or or not) of this book.

Written in user-friendly language, this book offers master's and doctoral level students in education and the social sciences a road map to developing and writing an effective literature review for a research project, thesis, or dissertation.

Organized around a comprehensive and detailed six-step developmental model, the book provides guided exercises, graphics, charts, and examples from the everyday experiences of practitioners.

Both novice and experienced researchers will find invaluable assistance for:

Selecting a topic
Searching the literature
Developing arguments
Surveying the literature
Critiquing the literature
Writing the literature review


And, of course, for more personalized help about your particular research interests, you can always call or email to arrange a research consultation with one of the Education Librarians - you will be glad you did!

Spring and Summer Hours

The Education Library has now moved to our spring and summer hours.


Holiday hours will be posted.

Education Library on Facebook

The Librarian is reading...

Sneaky Kid and Its Aftermath: Ethics and Intimacy in Fieldwork by Harry F. Wolcott

Summary:

Brad--a schizophrenic school dropout and "sneaky kid"--first appeared as a squatter near Harry Wolcott's forest home. He becomes Wolcott's subject in a long-term life history on how the educational system can fail students. Wolcott's trilogy of articles based on their years of interviews were well-received...until he admitted to an intimate relationship with the young man who, two years after leaving his shack, returned and attempted to murder the anthropologist. The Brad Trilogy then became the focus of heated academic discussions of research ethics, validity, intimacy, and the limitations of qualitative research. Here, Wolcott presents the full story of the Sneaky Kid and the firestorm it caused. Written in Wolcott's masterful style, the case offers an ideal starting point for discussing the complex public and personal dimensions of qualitative research with students. Included as an Appendix is the complete script of Johnny Saldana's ethnodrama recounting the story in play form.

April 26, 2011

Transformational Play: Using Games to Position Person, Content, and Context

This journal article appears in the October 2011 issue of Educational Researcher (Volume 39, Number 7).

Abstract:

Videogames are a powerful medium that curriculum designers can use to create narratively rich worlds for achieving educational goals. In these worlds, youth can become scientists, doctors, writers, and mathematicians who critically engage complex disciplinary content to transform a virtual world. Toward illuminating this potential, the authors advance the theory of transformational play. Such play involves taking on the role of a protagonist who must employ conceptual understandings to transform a problem-based fictional context and transform the player as well. The authors first survey the theory and then ground their discussion in two units that, as part of their design-based research methodology, have simultaneously given rise to and been informed by their theory of transformational play. They close with a discussion of research and design challenges.

April 21, 2011

eBook: Hybrid Learning: The Perils and Promise of Blending Online and Face-to-Face Instruction in Higher Education

Summary:

Hybrid Learning: The Perils and Promise of Blending Online and Face-to-Face Instruction in Higher Education is an in-depth exploration of a new learning mode that could radically change higher education, incorporating emerging trends in technology and multimedia use--including online gaming, social networking, and other Web 2.0 applications--to create engaging and dynamic learning environments.

Laying out fundamental challenges facing higher education today, this book shows how hybrid instruction can be designed and implemented to deliver excellent educational value in flexible modes and at moderate costs well-suited to the circumstances of many students and institutions.

The book lays out the characteristic profiles of students who are most likely to benefit from and perform well in a hybrid learning environment, as well as the features and practices of hybrid courses most likely to produce positive learning outcomes.

It also specifies the obligations of faculty in designing and delivering best-practice hybrid courses and the support and policy obligations of institutions.

Challenging prima-facie assumptions about hybrid learning, the author promotes it as nothing less than an opportunity to re-envision education for the 21st century.

eBook: The Materiality of Learning: Technology and Knowledge in Educational Practice

Summary:

The field of educational research lacks a methodology for the study of learning that does not begin with humans, their aims, and their interests.


The Materiality of Learning seeks to overcome this human-centered mentality by developing a novel spatial approach to the materiality of learning. Drawing on science and technology studies (STS), Estrid Sørensen compares an Internet-based 3D virtual environment project in a fourth-grade class with the class's work with traditional learning materials, including blackboards, textbooks, notebooks, pencils, and rulers.

Taking into account pupils' and teachers' physical bodies, Professor Sørensen analyzes the multiple forms of technology, knowledge, and presence that are enacted with the materials.

Featuring detailed ethnographic descriptions and useful end-of-chapter summaries, this book is an important reference for professionals and graduate or postgraduate students interested in a variety of fields, including educational studies, educational psychology, social anthropology, and STS.

eBook: Wikis: The Educator's Power Tool

Wikis are reliable and influential web-based tools that provide multiple benefits.

They allow teachers to share planning, collaborate with others, and involve students in interactive learning.

Wikis represent a very powerful ally of any media specialist seeking to support learning at the school site. Best of all, they're free!

Wikis can be one of the most effective learning tools for today's teachers -- if they're used correctly and appropriately.

In many cases, educators have not been using this powerful Web 2.0-based tool to its complete potential. In today's demanding, fast-paced education environment, educators need to take full advantage of the technology resources at their disposal to keep pace with tech-savvy students and meet assessment standards.

In Wikis: The Educator's Power Tool, the author shares her vast knowledge to unlock the capabilities of wikis for every educator.


Educational wiki use can be categorized into three major types: the library wiki, the reciprocal wiki, and student-produced wiki. This book gives real examples of all three uses, as well as straightforward instructions on how to set up, dress up, and lock down a wiki for optimal practicality, attractiveness, ease of use, and security. Student and content-specific examples are included.

eBook: Social Media for Trainers: Techniques for Enhancing and Extending Learning

Summary:

New social media technologies and strategies provide quick, easy solutions to many of the challenges faced by workplace training practitioners. Social media vehicles such as Twitter and Facebook, for example, can help trainers build learning communities, facilitate quick assignments, offer updates or follow-up tips, and otherwise extend the reach of the formal training event. Social Media for Trainers is the first how-to guide on the incorporation of social networking techniques into a trainer's repertoire. It covers the most popular Web 2.0 tools for instructor-created content (blogs), community-created content (wikis), micro-blogging (Twitter), and community sharing and interaction (Facebook), all with detailed instruction on conducting several training/training-related activities.

eBook: Social Software and Web 2.0 Technology Trends

Summary:

Web 2.0 tools and technologies have brought about important changes in the ability to collaborate and communicate across boundaries. Many of us make extensive use of these tools in our social and personal lives - to such a degree that we may want to incorporate them in our professional lives as well. Business leaders and managers who want to address this need may find all the options and alternatives confusing, which in turn makes it difficult to determine which tools and technologies are optimal for the business environment.


This informative volume succeeds in clarifying the business value of social software and Web 2.0 tools.

It furthermore makes an important contribution to explain the possibilities, applications and the positive and negative impacts that need to be considered before deciding on suitable Web 2.0 tools and technologies. Therefore, readers from academic, business and educational backgrounds should find this a useful and illuminating read.

The ten chapters are organised in six sections.

The first is Introduction to Social Software and Web 2.0, which equips the reader with knowledge to understand the relationship between concepts such as social networking, social software, Web 2.0 and collaboration.

The second section, Business Applications of Web 2.0 Technologies, gives useful suggestions on how businesses could exploit Web 2.0 tools and technologies. One chapter focuses on applications in the retail industry and specifically discusses consumer-generated content and how it influences the experiences and behaviour of customers. The next chapter suggests that - in the Web 2.0 context - the traditional marketing mix of product, pricing, promotion and placement need to be supplemented by a new p, namely participation. In this context, new marketing methods should be investigated. The third chapter in this section discusses the internal application of Web 2.0 and the significant impact these tools could have on organisational communication. This so-called Enterprise 2.0 mind-set presents many challenges and opportunities that are explored in this chapter.


Security and legal issues for the Enterprise 2.0 organisation. In this section the positive and negative impacts of Web 2.0 and in particular the legal and security vulnerabilities are surveyed. Issues such as privacy, intellectual property, security, fraud, e-discovery, legal requirements and compliance standards are considered.

Some of the recommendations include proactively protecting the data and selecting Web 2.0 tools wisely.

Virtual worlds. Many business and educational opportunities are made possible by virtual worlds. In this section, one chapter focuses on the features of Second Life and how politicians, businesses and educational institutions are utilising this technology. Further chapters look at how this environment has also brought about complex ethical concerns, particularly with regard to unethical behaviour and regulatory controls such as codes of conduct and service agreements to mitigate potential liability and risks.

Theoretical and educational perspectives on Web 2.0. Web 2.0 tools and technologies support new learning environments based on activity theory approaches, with a more collaborative and participatory nature. Both educational institutions and businesses need to be sensitive to the challenges and possibilities that could be the result of emerging learning styles and new ways of communication.


Glossary and Web 2.0 tutorial. The seven-page glossary provides a concise description of the terminology associated with Web 2.0. The tutorial could be of value for those interested in understanding the practicalities of the various Web 2.0 tools and technologies.

Blogs, podcasts, videocasts, wikis, virtual worlds, social networks, social bookmarks, social photo sharing, social tagging, mashups and video conferencing are each explained using the following outline:
Historical perspective.
Current trends.
Business applications.
Educational applications.
Hands-on "how to" descriptions.
Future trends.
Additional relevant sources.

eBook: Evidence-Based School Mental Health Services: Affect Education, Emotion Regulation Training, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Summary:

The challenges of providing mental health services to school children are numerous and diverse, ranging from staffing shortages to insufficient funding to family resistance to administrative indifference. Yet with the U.S. Surgeon General estimating that approximately 20% of young people display signs of psychological problems, the need for such services - particularly for interventions that not only address mental health issues but also reinforce protective factors - is considerable.

Evidence-Based School Mental Health Services offers readers an innovative, best-practices approach to providing effective mental health services at school. The author draws on the widely used and effective three-tiered public health model to create a school-based system that addresses the emotional and behavioral needs of students most at risk for experiencing, or showing strong signs and symptoms of, emotional problems or disabilities.

This prevention-oriented program adapts cognitive behavioral and other clinical therapies for use in primary through high school settings.

In several concise, easy-to-read chapters, the author addresses such important topics as:

* The rationale for building a three-tier mental health system in schools.

* The importance of making emotion regulation training available to all students.

* Designing strategies for adding affect education and emotion regulation training at each tier.

* Providing empirical support for implementing CBT in school settings.

Preparing young children to benefit from school-based CBT.

Also included is an Appendix of specific group activities and exercises that can be put to use in the school setting.

Evidence-Based School Mental Health Services is a must-have resource for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in school psychology, clinical child psychology, pediatrics, psychiatry, social work, school counseling, education as well as for those who develop or influence public policy.

And it is essential reading for any professional who is responsible for and interested in children's well-being and development.

eBook: Group Interventions in Schools: Promoting Mental Health for At-Risk Children and Youth

Summary:

Children who are labeled at-risk often suffer from severe deficiencies in cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills that, if unaddressed, may lead to limited prospects for future success and well-being. Tapping into the therapeutic potential of groups, this volume presents the theory and practice of cognitive-oriented group-centered counseling - combining intrinsic motivation, efficacy retraining, and targeted play therapy and social role-playing - that can be implemented to help children build core social skills and emotional regulation to complement their classroom instruction.

In addition to providing a complete framework for developing, facilitating, and evaluating group interventions with children in their natural learning environments, Group Interventions in Schools:

* Offers observational exercises to assist readers in gaining a deeper understanding of how group interventions work.

* Provides both the theory and research that supports real-world group-based motivational interventions.

* Explains how and why group-centered interventions support children's psychological adjustment and bolster their academic achievement.

* Analyzes how efficacy retraining works, specifically in changing the child's cognitive and academic motivations and perceptions.

* Features instructive case examples and proven, ready-to-use group-focused interventions that can be readily applied or adapted to specific situations.

* Shows how therapeutic gains translate into improved classroom performance.

Written primarily for school-based psychologists, counselors, and other school mental health personnel, this volume provides a solid foundation for those new to the field as well as a creative boost for group specialists. Other education professionals and mental health clinicians working with children and adolescents will find much of practical value here. Its accessible style makes the book worthwhile as a training text.

April 20, 2011

TODAY - 2nd Annual Research in Education Symposium

Graduate students in the Faculty of Education invite you to attend the 2nd Annual Research in Education Symposium from 4:00 pm to 8:30 pm TODAY - April 20, 2011.

It is a showcase of the latest education research related to the fields of Gender, Equity, and Social Justice, Curriculum Studies, Educational Policy Studies and Educational Psychology.

The guest speaker is Dr. Steve Killip from Thames Valley District School Board.

SEE YOU THERE!

Easter Long Weekend - The Education Library is Closed

The Education Library will be closed on Friday April 22nd, Saturday April 23rd and Sunday April 24th for the Easter long weekend. Check the Western Libraries' website for a detailed list of library hours.

Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is updated regularly and provides information that is additional to the information found on this blog - have a look!

A Synthesis of Research Concerning Creative Teachers in a Canadian Context

This journal article appears in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

Effective teachers are often creative ones, yet an examination of creative teaching is largely invisible in the North American creativity literature. Even within education there is little about teachers' own creative practice. Nonetheless, there are benefits to studying creative teachers: in education it can explicate ways of enhancing teachers' creativity and enriching praxis; and in psychology it can extend our understanding of social and interpersonal creativity, as well as everyday creativity. This paper reviews 12 Canadian case studies of creative teaching conducted by a creative teaching research group. An in-depth elaboration of two themes, creative person and community, is presented.

Internationally Educated Female Teachers in the Neoliberal Context: Their Labour Market and Teacher Certification Experiences in Canada

This journal article appears in the April 2011 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 27, Number 3).

Abstract:

In this paper, we consider the difficulties that a group of internationally educated female teachers (female IETs) encountered in the process of seeking certification in the Canadian Maritimes. We read their experiences in the context of neoliberalism, in particular how they are positioned in the labour force and also the teaching profession. We consider the material effects of differences such as gender, race, ethnicity, and regional location for the female IETs. Further, we underscore implications for teacher education.

Self-Regulation of Motivation When Learning Online: The Importance of Who, Why and How

This journal article appeared in the April 2011 special issue focused on "Motivation and New Media" of Educational Technology, Research and Development (Volu