Recently in Research Category

Knowledge Mobilization Workshop ~ September 6, 2012

Designing Knowledge Mobilization Plans: A Guide for Research and Grant Applications


Thursday, September 20, 2012
1:30 - 3:00 pm
Western University's Faculty of Education Community Room (Room1139)

Attend this knowledge mobilization (KM) workshop to learn about how to incorporate KM into your research plan - a critical component that is required by many grant applications. We'll show you how to create an effective KM plan that will not only help you write a stronger grant application but will also benefit your research and your dissemination of it to stakeholders. If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Kelly Bairos at kbairos@uwo.ca


All are welcome - please join us!

This information is from the publisher's website:

How can educational research have more impact? What processes of knowledge exchange are most effective for increasing the uses of research results? How can research-produced knowledge be better 'mobilized' among users such as practicing educators, policy makers, and the public communities?


These sorts of questions are commanding urgent attention in educational discourses and research policies now circulating around the world. This attention has been translated into powerful material exercises that shape what is considered to be worthwhile research and how research is funded, recognized, and assessed. Yet precisely what activities constitute effective knowledge mobilization, or even what is meant by 'moving knowledge', remains unclear. What politics are at play in determining knowledge 'impact' across radically different contexts? Who determines what counts as impact, and for what purposes? How are 'results' of educational research separated from its participants and processes? In addition knowledge mobilization also invokes debates about the languages through which knowledge is constructed, policy processes are enacted, and research unfolds.

The CALL NUMBER for this new book is LB1028.K54 2012 and it can be found downstairs in the Education Library's lower level STACKS.

Journal Resource for Researchers ~ Canadian and International Education

Canadian and International Education, the official journal of the Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC), is published twice a year and is devoted to publishing articles dealing with education in a comparative and international perspective. This journal is now edited by the Faculty of Education's Marianne Larsen.

But, wait, there's more!

You may know all about Western Libraries' "traditional" collections but do you know about these SPECIAL COLLECTIONS?

Tutorial ~ How To Read A Scholarly Article

Western Libraries is creating online tutorials to help students - have a look!

"Users and creators of copyrighted works are required to understand their rights and responsibilities under the Copyright Act. The following links provide detailed information on the use of copyrighted works, the rights of creators of copyrighted works, and information specific to the use of copyrighted material at Western University."


Western University Academic Librarians and Archivists

Denise Horoky and Christena McKillop are the academic librarians for the Faculty of Education. In addition, you have a whole team of academic librarians and archivists supporting you and your research. Contact us.

Program Guides are ...

...a great place to START your searching for library resources especially if you are new to a field of study. Program Guides are very useful for students. What more can we say?

New Resource for Researchers ~ London Free Press Archives

Western Libraries now subscribes to a searchable full text archive of the London Free Press from 1995-2012. The search engine lets you limit your results by date and use a variety of simple and complex searching techniques to find articles.

New Online Tutorial from Western Libraries ~ What is Grey Literature?

What do you think of when you hear the word grey? fuzzy? undefined? What about 'grey literature'? Watch this video to find out how grey literature might help you!

Education Research Databases

Looking for research journal articles for your assignments, literature review and upcoming papers? As a student a Western University you have access to hundreds of research databases and full-text journal articles. As a Faculty of Education student you may be most interested in the education-related research databases. Start your literature review in one of the education research databases:

CBCA Education (for Canadian/Ontario education related journal articles)
ERIC
ProQuest Education Journals
Professional Development Collection

And, for our Counselling/Educational Psychology students: PsycINFO

The rules of APA Style®, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On this site, you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

Graduate Students ~ Manage Your References and Citations with RefWorks

All Faculty of Education graduate students are encouraged to set up their free RefWorks account very early in the term. Here are the instructions for setting up your account, FAQ's and help pages.

Did You Know? Library Research Consultations Can Be ...

...in-person, by email, by phone or via methods like Skype. All students, including our growing cohort of online students have many options for contacting the academic research librarians to receive library research assistance. Contact us by email: eduref@uwo.ca

Getting Started ~ Graduate Student Program Guide

Here is the Graduate Student Program Guide. This librarian-created guide is good place to get started when you need to complete an application for research grants/funding, conduct a literature review, write your papers as part of your courses and conduct your own research. All of the contact information for the academic research librarian is included. Contact us to book a research consultation (in-person, via phone and via email, or if you like, Skype). Online research consultations with the academic librarian are not just for the students who are here onsite at the Faculty of Education. These research consultations are available to our online students, as well. Contact us and let's set up a meeting.

Tutorial ~ How To Read A Scholarly Article

Western Libraries is creating online tutorials - have a look!

Research Consultations for Graduate Students

The Education Library offers personalized and customized library research consultations for graduate students. Make an appointment with the Research Librarian using our email address: eduref@uwo.ca (or call the Research Librarian @ 519-661-2111 ext 88275)

People We Know ~ Dr. Geoff Milburn

It is with the heaviest of hearts and great sadness that we announce the death of Dr. Geoff Milburn.

Geoff made a monumental contribution to Western's Faculty of Education. He entered the faculty the day its doors opened in 1965. He was a pillar in the development of the Masters program and served as Graduate Education Chair for a number of years. Students fought to be enrolled in his courses and he was revered by some who shone under his tutelage.

Geoff created The Althouse Press 35 years ago in 1977 and had continued to edit AP manuscripts up until about a month ago. He turned back the most recent manuscript just last week. Geoff had also served as the Canadian Editor of Taylor and Francis's Journal of Curriculum Studies for many, many years. In the publishing world, he has been respected as one of the finest editors ever.

I have lost an intellectually generous colleague, a respected mentor and a witty friend.

Canadian and International Education

Canadian and International Education, the official journal of the Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC), is published twice a year and is devoted to publishing articles dealing with education in a comparative and international perspective.

Tutorial ~ How To Read A Scholarly Article

Western Libraries is creating online tutorials - have a look!

Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™ focuses on Canadian information in the field of education. It's the perfect source for those interested in teaching, educational research, and educational administration in Canada.

CBCA Education is a ProQuest product so the search screen will look similar to the ERIC database and to ProQuest Education Journals.


If you are working off campus you must type in your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account).
Click on DATABASES on the Western Libraries homepage.
Click on C.
Click on CBCA Education.
Start typing in (and combining) your keywords.

Western Libraries is now providing access to Films on Demand videostreaming.

Films on Demand provides a state-of-the-art streaming video platform to incorporate outstanding educational programs from Films Media Group into content management systems (CMS), online lesson plans, and distance learning courseware.

Graduate Student Program Guide

Deciding which database to search can be time-consuming for researchers. Use our Graduate Student Program Guide to get quick-started on your coursework, class assignments, papers, literature reviews and individual research. Use the contact information included in this guide to ask questions via email or telephone. This service is especially handy for online students who do not visit our Faculty of Education building.

JSTOR Research Database

JSTOR is a research database and it provides access to full-text, full-image, scholarly literature. The growing database contains the archives of major research journals in a variety of academic disciplines. The Education research coverage is growing.

JSTOR offers the scanned image of each journal page as it was originally designed, printed, and illustrated. Coverage for each journal starts with the very first issue, many of which date from the 1800's.

A link to JSTOR is provided in the Western Libraries DATABASES link.

CMEC Statement on Play-Based Learning

From a press release from the Council of Ministers of Education Canada (CMEC):

In the context of ongoing discussions on early childhood learning and development, provincial and territorial ministers of education have released a statement on the intrinsic value of play‑based learning and its central role in the formative years of young learners.

Project MUSE

Project MUSE is a leading provider of digital humanities and social sciences content; since 1995, its electronic journal collections have supported a wide array of research needs at academic, public, special, and school libraries worldwide. MUSE books and journals, from leading university presses and scholarly societies, are fully integrated for search and discovery.

MUSE currently includes: 249,246 articles and 304,383 chapters by 193 publishers.

Journal of Education Finance

The Journal of Education Finance contains original research and analysis on issues such as education reform, judicial intervention in finance, school-social agency linkages, tax limitation measures, and factors influencing teacher salaries.

What is Scholars Portal?

Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

Why should graduate students (and faculty members) use Scholars Portal?


The content in Scholars Portal is hand-selected by subject specialists at the 21 university libraries that make up the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL). The content graduate students will find in Scholars Portal comprises the most complete multi-disciplinary database of peer reviewed academic literature available anywhere. With a single-search, graduate students can find material from the important journals in your field. You can track new issues in these journals using RSS feeds. You can follow citation links to explore different treatments of topics. You can explore historical dimensions of many topics by searching through extensive backfiles of digitized articles.

Here is the Graduate Student Program Guide. This librarian-created guide is good place to get started when you need to complete an application for research grants/funding, conduct a literature review, write your papers as part of your course and conduct your own research. All of the contact information for the academic research librarian is also included. Contact us to book a research consultation (in-person, via phone and via email). Online research consultations with the academic librarian are available to our online students, as well.

Did You Know? Research Consultations Can Be ...

...in-person, by email, by phone or via methods like Skype. All students, including our growing cohort of online students have many options for contacting the academic research librarians to receive research assistance.

Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews, for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests.

The field of education is multidisciplinary. It is very often necessary (and sometimes mandatory) for graduate students to search other subject databases (for example graduate students will also want to the search Dissertations and Theses and PsycINFO databases).

New Online Resource ~ Primal Pictures' Anatomy.TV

Anatomy.TV is an online anatomy reference from Primal Pictures featuring more than 6,500 interactive 3D models of the human body. Models focus on individual organs, regions of the body, or anatomical systems. The 3D images in Anatomy.TV are derived from medical scan data interpreted by staff anatomists, and constructed by graphic specialists using advanced imaging. Anatomy.TV can be accessed through the Shared Library Catalogue.

The Education Library is open daily from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.
We will resume weekend and evening hours in September.
When the Education Library is closed please avail yourselves to all of the information available online:

Education Library website and Recent News
Education Library's Program Guides
Education Library's Facebook and Twitter pages
Western Libraries Research Databases
Western Libraries Catalogue

Starting at the Western Libraries website (log in if you are working Off Campus), choose DATABASES from the left-hand menu choices. Choose D. Click on Dissertations and Theses.

Doing a thorough literature review includes searching a database called Dissertations and Theses. Reading the literature review of a thesis related to your topic, and following up on relevant references included in that thesis is another way to easily expand your literature review.

Helpful Hint: This database is a ProQuest product so if you have already search other ProQuest databases (e.g., CBCA Education and ProQuest Education Journals) you can use the same search strategies. When you learn how to search one ProQuest product, you know how to search all their products.

Start at the Western Libraries website:

If you are working off campus, please type in your Western University username and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website.

Under the caption RESEARCH TOOLS, click on the option "Databases"

Select one of the databases you want to search. For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian information), ERIC or PsycINFO or ProQuest Education Journals to get started on your literature review.

Databases are "keyword friendly" - type in some of the concepts you are considering and see what kind of results you are getting. Planning your search ahead of time and capturing relevant terms will be extremely efficient when you sit down to search the databases. You may find other keywords just by glancing at the titles in your results list. If so, give those keywords a try. Other keywords can be taken from your course lectures, notes, peer-to-peer discussions, scholarly readings, or a visit with the academic librarian at the Education Library.

KNAER: Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research

This information is from KNAER's website:

The Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) will, in consultation with the Ontario Ministry of Education, engage in a dialogue with groups of practitioners/researchers to facilitate the development and dissemination of advanced knowledge through the application of applied education research, extending to effective practices in class-rooms, schools, school boards as well as provincially.


The KNAER will also focus on building, advancing and applying robust evidence of effective practices through conducting research, synthesizing state-of-the-art knowledge from existing bodies of evidence from Ontario, nationally and internationally.

KNAER and People We Know

The University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario continue to collaboratively manage KNAER. Key people at each institution include:

Ben Levin, Professor and Canadian Research Chair at UT, Director of KNAER

Katina Pollock, Associate Professor at UWO, has replaced Bob MacMillan as Associate Director of KNAER

Hilary Edelstein, KNAER program manager, Research & Knowledge Mobilization
Kelly Bairos, KNAER network manager
Regina Hui, KNAER administrative assistant at UT
Colin Couchman, KNAER administrative support at UWO
Nelly Leizerovich, KNAER financial administrator at UT

The Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) was established in October 2010 as a collaborative partnership among the Ontario Ministry of Education, the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario (now Western University Canada) to support the ministry's commitment to develop and implement policies, programs, and practices that are evidence-based, research-informed, and connected to provincial education goals.

The specific role of the KNAER is to mobilize evidence of effective school and classroom practices across Ontario to improve education policy and practice to benefit student outcomes. By funding a variety of knowledge mobilization projects, the KNAER facilitates networks of policy makers, educators and researchers working collaboratively to apply research to practice, to broker new and existing knowledge, and to connect with other national and international networks. This is a rare example of significant collaborative effort to strengthen the connection of research to practice.



One problem in the field of knowledge and research use is the lack of agreement on basic terms and ideas. Similar to many other areas of social science, a wide variety of terms and approaches is in use. There are numerous definitions that vary across sectors and disciplines. The health sector often uses the term knowledge translation, whereas the business sector uses knowledge management, and so on. Regardless of the term, the underlying spirit is the same trying to make research matter more in policy and practice for organizational and system improvement.

KNAER Event ~ Research-Practice Spotlight Session at CSSE 2012

Symposium Title: Government, University, and School District Collaboration: Promoting Research Use to Improve Education

Symposium Participants: Doris McWhorter (Ontario Ministry of Education / ministère de l'Éducation de l'Ontario), David Tyrer, Julia Lalande (Ontario Ministry of Education / ministère de l'Éducation de l'Ontario), Amanda Cooper (OISE, University of Toronto), Colin Couchman, Katina Pollock (Western University), Ben Levin (OISE, University of Toronto), Terry Spencer (London District Catholic School Board), Sally Landon (Grand Erie District School Board), Bob Macmillan (University of Manitoba)


KNAER ~ Visiting Scholar at Western: Marcelo Borba (May 2012)

Marcelo Borba, UNESP (Sao Paulo State University at Rio Claro) was invited to speak at the Faculty of Education in May 2012. The title of the presentation was "Internet, humans-with-media and the notion of 'class' in schools." In this talk Borba contrasted the way the notion of time has been transformed by Internet and how such a change clashes with the way school organizes its time in terms of blocks of time, namely "classes." Borba used the concept of humans-with-media to push this tension further in terms of knowledge construction.

On Thursday March 1, 2012, international scholars Christine Sleeter (Professor Emerita, California State University Monterey Bay) and Rodney Hopson (Duquesne University) visited Western's Faculty of Education to talk about equity in education with faculty, students, and the community. Christine and Rodney's visit was funded through the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) as projects funded under the "Visits by World-Leading Researchers" category.

"Teachers are playing Whac-A-Mole and consistently busy putting out fires, because they're the only person in the room responsible for the rules and their enforcement," said the Faculty of Education professor. "You need it to be a more collective method."

Edmund's approach, entitled Dymanic Classroom Management (DCM), focuses on changing how students think about their actions - emphasizing teacher-student conversations to establish classroom rules, routines and rewards. In his program, teachers and students set the rules and help enforce them together. It's this co-operation that drives buy-in.

By June, a comprehensive Behaviour Management Network website will make all DCM materials accessible to elementary and secondary schools across Ontario. Edmunds received a $100,000 grant from the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) to facilitate the development and dissemination of his research.

Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western is a multi-functional portal that collects, showcases, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by Western University community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing and broaden the international recognition of Western University academic excellence by providing open access to Western's intellectual output and professional achievements.

International Indigenous Policy Journal (IIPJ)

Welcome to the International Indigenous Policy Journal (IIPJ). An editorial and advisory board made up of 31 experts in Indigenous issues leads this peer-reviewed journal. Regionally, they represent North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

IIPJ has a very specific set of goals:

To promote evidence based policymaking.
To encourage quality research based on partnerships with Indigenous peoples.
To develop networks of policy researchers and policy makers, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, and their communities.
To improve scholarship related to Indigenous issues.
To spark debate on important policy issues facing countries and peoples around the world.

This is a blog post from Bibliothécaires de l'APUO / APUO Librarians: For and about unionized librarians working at the University of Ottawa:

In 2008 at the CAUT LIbrarians conference in Ottawa, Toni Samek spoke about how librarians - the people who fight for freedom of expression for society as a whole - rarely enjoy freedom of expression themselves. Her talk focused on workplace speech but the experience of several active and retired librarians at the recent Canadian Librarian Association (CLA) conference in Ottawa went beyond restrictions on workplace speech; librarians were silenced at their own conference for trying to raise awareness of the current challenges to Library and Archives (LAC.)

Themed Issue ~ Young Children

The May 2012 issue of Young Children (Volume 67, Number 3) is a themed issue with a focus on "Technology and Young Children: New Tools and Strategies for Teachers and Learners."

Some of the fascinating featured articles include:

Finding the Education in Educational Technology with Early Learners (Page 14)

Interactive Whiteboards in Early Childhood Mathematics: Strategies for Effective Implementation in Pre-K-Grade 3 (Page 26)

Touch Table Surprises: A Preschool Teacher's Story (Page 36)

Exploring Elephant Seals in New Jersey: Preschoolers Use Collaborative Multimedia Albums (Page 42)

iDocument: How Smartphones and Tablets are Changing Documentation in Preschool and Primary Classrooms (Page 42)

Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews, for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests.

The field of education is multidisciplinary. It is very often necessary (and sometimes mandatory) for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list (for example graduate students will also want to the search Dissertations and Theses and PsycINFO databases).

Visiting Scholar ~ Dr. Fred Dervin

Our Visiting Scholar, Dr. Fred Dervin, gave his first presentation here at the Faculty of Education on Tuesday, June 5th entitled "The Re-imagining of International students'
Experiences."

Summary of the presentation:

International student Mobility leaves few people indifferent. Individuals, policymakers, institutions, the media, etc. all have their opinions about its pros and cons. As such it can be lauded--sometimes even fetishized (Robertson 2010)--and/or disapproved of before, during and after it is experienced. Yet international student mobility is now here to stay--volens nolens--as it has become part of the "complex interdependencies between, and social consequences, of the diverse mobilities" that characterise our era (Urry 2010: 348). Using the context of Finnish education, the presentation illustrates how international student mobility is filled with many and varied myths. Just like many myths are associated with postmodern mobility (Maffesoli 1997), Policies, research and 'common sense' discourses on the present-day mobility of students have led to the creation of numerous new myths. In this presentation I propose to "re-imagine" international students' experiences by defusing some of these myths.

Visiting Scholar ~ Dr. Fred Dervin

Please help us to welcome Dr. Fred Dervin, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland and Visiting Scholar at the Faculty of Education for the next month (until June 28th). You are cordially invited to browse a new display in the Education Library featuring some selected works of Dr. Fred Dervin.

Sites We Like ~ The Salty Chip

The Salty Chip is a "space for teachers and students to share and build upon their work as they develop their use of multiliteracies. It seeks to capture cultural and linguistic diversity and to make use of new and emerging communication technologies that consider pedagogy in a participatory culture."

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western is a multi-functional portal that collects, showcases, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by Western University community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing and broaden the international recognition of Western University academic excellence by providing open access to Western's intellectual output and professional achievements.

Scholars GeoPortal ~ A Data Discovery Tool

The Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) launched the live version of Scholars Geoportal in March 2012.

An excerpt from the press release describes the Geoportal as "an award-winning" geospatial data discovery tool allowing Ontario's university students and researchers to enrich their teaching and research by engaging with OCUL's growing collection of geospatial data. The portal offers search, preview, query, download and sharing functionality for datasets licensed by Ontario university libraries, covering such topics as land use, transportation networks, census boundaries, geology, soils, points of interest (such as healthcare facilities, schools, and airports), air photos, and more."


For GIS and data resources and assistance, please contact or visit the Map and Data Centre, Room 1051 Social Science Centre (on main campus).

Films on Demand provides a state-of-the-art streaming video platform to incorporate outstanding educational programs from Films Media Group into content management systems (like WebCT) online lesson plans, and distance learning courseware.

Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) database covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually.

Attention Graduate Students ~ Do You Know About Scholars Portal?

What is Scholars Portal?

Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

Why should graduate students use Scholars Portal?

The content in Scholars Portal is hand-selected by subject specialists at the 21 university libraries that make up the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL). The content graduate students will find in Scholars Portal comprises the most complete multi-disciplinary database of peer reviewed academic literature available anywhere. With a single-search, graduate students can find material from the important journals in your field. You can track new issues in these journals using RSS feeds. You can follow citation links to explore different treatments of topics. You can explore historical dimensions of many topics by searching through extensive backfiles of digitized articles.

You will find Scholars Portal listed under S in the Databases list on the Western Libraries website.

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN ED 9514 COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WILL FIND THIS RESOURCE ESPECIALLY USEFUL FOR THEIR COURSE WORK.

Attention Graduate Students: Dissertations and Theses Database

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses -- Full text is the world's most comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses. This database includes 2.7 million searchable citations together with 1.2 million full text dissertations that are available for download in PDF format. The database offers full text for most of the dissertations added since 1997.

Start at the Western Libraries homepage. If you are working off campus you must use your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account). Click on DATABASES on the Western Libraries homepage. Click on D. Click on Dissertations and Theses. It is that easy to get started.

Attention Graduate Students: CBCA Education Database

Canadian Business & Current Affairs (CBCA) Education™ focuses on Canadian information in the field of education. It's the perfect source for those interested in teaching, educational research, and educational administration in Canada.

Start at the Western Libraries homepage. If you are working off campus you must use your Western University username and password (the same ones you use for your Western email account). Click on DATABASES on the Western Libraries homepage. Click on C. Click on CBCA Education. It is that easy to get started.


Read more about CBCA Education.

The proposed changes at Library & Archives Canada (LAC) have far-reaching implications for how Canada's history and cultural heritage are preserved and understood. The "modernization" underway is a direct attack on our collective memory. To prevent the demise of this vital national institution, Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) has launched a campaign, Save Library & Archives Canada to ensure that LAC maintains its commitment to preserve and make publicly available Canada's full documentary heritage.

New books arrive daily in the Education Library. We try to showcase these new resources in a variety of ways. We display them on our NEW ACQUISITIONS shelf on the main floor of the library. The Education Library will also be showcasing parts of our amazing collection in a series of rotating displays. These displays are located across the hallway from the Faculty of Education's Community Room. Do not let the construction going on in that hallway stop you from taking a peek at the newest display.

We strongly encourage graduate students (onsite and online) to book a research consultation appointment (in person or via email) with the academic librarians for a personalized and customized information session about database searching and efficient use of library research resources. You will be glad you did!

Doing a thorough literature review includes searching a database called Dissertations and Theses. Reading the literature review of an already completed thesis similar or related to your topic, and following up on relevant references included in that thesis is another way to easily expand your own literature review.

This database is a ProQuest product so if you have already searched a ProQuest database (CBCA Education, ERIC and ProQuest Education Journals are all ProQuest databases) you can use the same search strategies. All of the databases are "keyword friendly" so spend some time creating a list of keywords prior to searching the databases.

This Dissertations and Theses database provides subject, title, and author access to almost all American dissertations accepted at an accredited institution since 1861. Masters theses have been selectively indexed since 1962. Abstracts are included for doctoral dissertation records from July 1980 to the present.

The full text of over 100,000 dissertations is available now at this Web site. In addition, the Dissertations and Theses database serves to disseminate citations for thousands of Canadian dissertations and an increasing number of papers accepted in institutions abroad.

What is Scholars Portal?

Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

Why should graduate students use Scholars Portal?

The content in Scholars Portal is hand-selected by subject specialists at the 21 university libraries that make up the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL). The content graduate students will find in Scholars Portal comprises the most complete multi-disciplinary database of peer reviewed academic literature available anywhere. With a single-search, graduate students can find material from the important journals in your field. You can track new issues in these journals using RSS feeds. You can follow citation links to explore different treatments of topics. You can explore historical dimensions of many topics by searching through extensive backfiles of digitized articles.

You will find Scholars Portal listed under S in the Databases list on the Western Libraries website or simply click HERE.

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN ED 9514 COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WILL FIND THIS RESOURCE ESPECIALLY USEFUL FOR THEIR COURSE WORK.

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews, for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests.

The field of education is multidisciplinary. It is very often necessary (and sometimes mandatory) for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list (for example graduate students will also want to the search Dissertations and Theses and PsycINFO databases).

Getting started on your literature review and other papers is easy!


If you are working off campus, please type in your Western Identity user name and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website.

Under the caption RESEARCH TOOLS, click on the option "Databases"


Select one of the databases you want to search. For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian information), ERIC or PsycINFO or ProQuest Education Journals to get started on your literature review.

Databases are "keyword friendly" - type in some of the concepts you are considering and see what kind of results you are getting. Planning your search ahead of time and capturing relevant terms will be extremely efficient when you sit down to search the databases. You may find other keywords just by glancing at the titles and abstract in your results list. If so, give those keywords a try. Other keywords can be taken from your course lectures, notes, peer-to-peer discussions, scholarly readings, or a visit with the academic librarian at the Education Library.

What is Ulrichsweb?

Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

What does it include?

Ulrichsweb database covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

Where do you find Ulrichsweb?

You can find this resource listed under U in the Databases list on the Western Libraries website or you can simply click HERE.

Summon (default search option - available in the middle of the Western Library's website) is a search engine that will help you discover content from Western Libraries' vast collection of books, journal articles and other formats for virtually any topic. Summon uses a single search box with options to customize and focus your search strategy. Summon is a great place to start your research for both discipline specific and interdisciplinary subjects. Advanced researchers may continue to require and search stand-alone subject specific products including the Shared Library Catalogue or databases such as those offered by ProQuest and EBSCO. These systems have specialized search options not available through Summon.

New Books Arriving Daily

The Education Library receives daily shipments of new books. Our collection is always growing. We put these new books on a shelf in prominent view on the main floor of the Education Library. This shelf is labelled "New Acquisitions." Drop by the Education Library, browse the new titles and feel free to sign out any material that interests you. I will, of course, continue to feature some of our new books on this blog (see entries below) but these are just a fraction of the new material arriving daily. Some of the new books also get showcased on the Education Library's RECENT NEWS feature.

International Indigenous Policy Journal (IIPJ)

Welcome to the International Indigenous Policy Journal (IIPJ). An editorial and advisory board made up of 31 experts in Indigenous issues leads this peer-reviewed journal. Regionally, they represent North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

IIPJ has a very specific set of goals:

To promote evidence based policymaking.
To encourage quality research based on partnerships with Indigenous peoples.
To develop networks of policy researchers and policy makers, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, and their communities.
To improve scholarship related to Indigenous issues.
To spark debate on important policy issues facing countries and peoples around the world.

A copy of this study can be found in Scholarship@Western. It was published in the February 2012 issue of Residential Treatment For Children & Youth (Volume 29, Issue 1).

Mendeley Reference Manager - An Alternative to RefWorks

Mendeley is a FREE reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research.

Features:
~ Automatically generate bibliographies
~ Collaborate easily with other researchers online
~ Easily import papers from other research software
~ Find relevant papers based on what you're reading
~ Access your papers from anywhere online
~ Read papers on the go, with our new iPhone app

New Streaming Video Platform ~ Films on Demand (Education)

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Films on Demand provides a state-of-the-art streaming video platform to incorporate outstanding educational programs from Films Media Group into content management systems (like WebCT) online lesson plans, and distance learning courseware. Just do a title search on the catalogue and follow the links to view this streamed video content.

Mendeley - A Free Reference Manager

Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research.

Features:
~ Automatically generate bibliographies
~ Collaborate easily with other researchers online
~ Easily import papers from other research software
~ Find relevant papers based on what you're reading
~ Access your papers from anywhere online
~ Read papers on the go, with our new iPhone app

Education Library Closed ~ Easter Weekend ~ April 6 - 8, 2012

The Education Library will be closed on Friday April 6th, Saturday April 7th and Sunday April 8th. We re-open with regular hours on Monday April 9th, 2012. Of course, access to our electronic resources never closes so you can still search all your favourite databases!

People We Know ~ Denise Horoky

I wrote a short article for the UWOFA Faculty Times Newsletter. It appeared in the February 2012 issue (Volume XIV, Number 3). The February 2012 issue was a theme issue dedicated to reflections of the Librarians and Archivists Strike that took place here at Western in September 2012. The title of my article is Strikes and Springsteen: Why my graduate students expect me to be "better than Google."

New books are added to the Education Library collection daily. Starting this month, we will be showcasing parts of our amazing collection in a series of rotating displays. These displays are across the hallway from the Faculty of Education's Community Room. Have a look!

Social Sciences Citation Index (listed under S on the DATABASES list on the Western Libraries website) is part of the multidisciplinary database, Web of Science. It contains searchable author abstracts from 1,700 major journals across a broad range of disciplines in the social sciences.

Social Sciences Citation Index®, accessed via Web of Science®, provides researchers, administrators, faculty, and students with quick, powerful access to the bibliographic and citation information they need to find research data, analyze trends, journals and researchers, and share their findings.

With Social Sciences Citation Index, you can:

Find high-impact articles from peer-reviewed, influential journals.
Uncover relevant results in related fields.
Discover emerging trends that help you pursue successful research and grant acquisition.
Identify potential collaborators with significant citation records.
Integrate searching, writing, and bibliography creation into one streamlined process.


Need to know if a journal is peer-reviewed or not? Check Ulrichsweb

What is Ulrichsweb?

Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.

What does it include?

Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

ERIC Extends Peer-Reviewed Designation to Earlier Records

ERIC searchers will now find it easier to identify the peer-reviewed status of more materials in ERIC, thanks to the addition of this data for journal articles from 1966 to 2003 (the status is already available on ERIC records from 2004 forward).

ERIC is updating the backfile of article records on a journal by journal basis. Enhanced records are appearing daily on the ERIC web site (at www.eric.ed.gov), and vendors will receive the changes on a monthly basis. It is expected that the updates to more than 680,000 journal records will be completed within the next six months.

Staff librarians consult three sources to determine whether a journal title is peer-reviewed:

* Ulrichsweb
* The Serials Directory
* Publisher-provided information

ERIC has additionally modified all bibliographic records to display "Yes" or a blank space rather than "Yes", "No", or "N/A" in the Peer-Reviewed field of the record. This change to "Yes" or blank is also viewable in ERIC's Journal List.


For more information, see ERIC's new policy on the Peer-Reviewed Designation.

More Information on the ERIC Peer-Review Project

This ERIC update is from Nancy Cawley, Communications Lead, ERIC Project:

Dear Colleagues:

First, I'd like to thank the library community for the positive feedback we've received on the backfile peer-review project. ERIC is in the process of adding the peer-review status to journal records indexed between 1966 and 2003 to enhance the collection for the research community. To date, more than 30,000 records have been updated with the peer-review status. Updates will continue to be processed throughout the year.

The Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER) marks an ambitious effort to strengthen relationships between research, policy and practice in education in Ontario. Due to an overwhelming response, KNAER has been extended to March 2013. Currently, all available funds for the network are committed to projects occurring between now and March 31st, 2013.

In just nine months since KNAER launched, 44 projects have been approved that involve diverse partnerships of over 120 organizations across the sector, totalling in over $2 million dollars of funding.

KEY PEOPLE

The University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario continue to collaboratively manage KNAER. Key people at each institution include:

Ben Levin, Professor and Canadian Research Chair at UT, Director of KNAER
Katina Pollock, Associate Professor at UWO, has replaced Bob MacMillan as Co-Director of KNAER
Amanda Cooper, KNAER program manager, Research & Knowledge Mobilization
Colin Couchman, KNAER network manager
Regina Hui, KNAER administrative assistant at UT
Kelly Bairos, KNAER administrative assistant at UWO
Nelly Leizerovich, KNAER financial administrator at UT



People We Know ~ John Barnett, Vance McPherson & Rachel Sandieson

Summary from Scholarship@Western:

"Teaching in the Virtual World" was a Masters level course in the Faculty of Education, delivered entirely online through WebCT Owl. There were 18 participants including the instructor. Each student created and taught one module on a topic in which they had experience or interest. Each module contained curriculum materials prepared by the student and a discussion that they facilitated and moderated.

This research aims to explore the practical application of Connectivist learning theory in a Masters course called "Teaching in the Virtual World" from the viewpoints of three course participants - the instructor and two students.

New Books Arriving Daily

The Education Library receives daily shipments of new books. Our collection is always growing. We put these new books on a shelf in prominent view on the main floor of the Education Library. This shelf is labelled "New Acquisitions." Drop by the Education Library, browse the new titles, and feel free to sign out any material that interests you. I will, of course, continue to feature some of our new books on this blog (see entries below) but these are just a fraction of the new material arriving daily. Some of the new books get highlighted on the Education Library's Recent News feature.

To the uninformed, surveys appear to be an easy type of research to design and conduct, but when students and professionals delve deeper, they encounter the vast complexities that the range and practice of survey methods present. To complicate matters, technology has rapidly affected the way surveys can be conducted; today, surveys are conducted via cell phone, the Internet, email, interactive voice response, and other technology-based modes. Thus, students, researchers, and professionals need both a comprehensive understanding of these complexities and a revised set of tools to meet the challenges.

In conjunction with top survey researchers around the world and with Nielsen Media Research serving as the corporate sponsor, the Encyclopedia of Survey Research Methods presents state-of-the-art information and methodological examples from the field of survey research. Although there are other "how-to" guides and references texts on survey research, none is as comprehensive as this Encyclopedia, and none presents the material in such a focused and approachable manner. With more than 600 entries, this resource uses a Total Survey Error perspective that considers all aspects of possible survey error from a cost-benefit standpoint.

The Encyclopedia of Survey Research Methods is specifically written to appeal to beginning, intermediate, and advanced students, practitioners, researchers, consultants, and consumers of survey-based information.

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Sites We Like ~ The Childwatch International Research Network

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The Childwatch International Research Network is a global, non-profit, nongovernmental network of institutions that collaborate in child research for the purpose of promoting child rights and improving children's well-being around the world. It was founded in 1993 as a response from the research community to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, an instrument for changing the focus of research and for ensuring that the perspectives of children are heard. The Convention is the basis for the Network's common agenda.

Childwatch links local, regional and national research efforts to an international research based knowledge, practice and policy on children's issues. It seeks a more effective and strategic approach to child research globally. Childwatch has unique potential to harness the collective capacity of international child researchers to identify and investigate major questions of global significance in the lives of children.

The Network focuses on critical issues in the lives of children and youth, and their families. It seeks to encourage multi-disciplinary research, policy development and training that promote the well being, rights, civic and social participation and the full development of children. Childwatch values research about effective and appropriate practices to achieve these goals and research that describes the current condition of children and youth.

And, I Quote...

Mmm...maybe I should make a hip-hop/rap mashup music video about library research and reference services?

The continuing failure of students to grasp the academic function of librarians is a serious concern and the persistence of this problem indicates that established methods of promoting their role via library web pages, student inductions and handouts are not enough, even when combined with newer tools such as blogs and RSS feeds (Bickley and Corrall, 2011, p. 237).

Source: Bickley, R. and Corrall, S. (2011), "Student perceptions of staff in the information commons: a survey at the University of Sheffield", Reference Services Review, Vol. 39 No. 2, pp. 223-43.

Terms of Endearment: Engaging Students in the Digital Age

This journal article appeared in the January 2012 issue of OCLC Systems & Services: International Digital Library Perspectives (Volume 28, Number 1).

Abstract:

Purpose - This article seeks to describe the challenge of providing impactful research assistance to college students. Design/methodology/approach - The article discusses student perceptions of librarians, and the lack of awareness students have about the reference and research support provided by librarians. Findings - The article suggests alternative approaches to engaging students may break down barriers, but are no replacement for individual consultation. Originality/value - The article provides thoughts around retention of librarian approachability in the digital age.

This journal article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Reference Services Review (Volume 40, Number 1).

Abstract:

Purpose - This study aims to evaluate 125 research libraries in North America to identify whether they incorporate reference and social networking tools in their library's website. Design/methodology/approach - A content analysis of 125 library websites is conducted to determine whether libraries who are members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) incorporate and promote reference and social networking tools in their website. For the purpose of this study, a list of reference and social networking tools was chosen and each library's website was visited to determine first, which reference and social networking tools from this list appear on their library's homepage and, second, which tools appear elsewhere on the library's website. Findings - The results show that even though most of these reference and social networking tools are incorporated into their library's websites, their presence is lower on their library's homepage. Practical implications - Academic and research libraries should incorporate reference and social networking tools on their library's homepage to make these services more visible and more easily accessible to their users. Originality/value - This study demonstrates the importance of the right placement for reference and social networking tools on ARL websites.

Embedded Academic Librarian Experiences in Online Courses

This journal article appeared in the January 2011 issue of Library Management (Volume 32, Issue 6/7).

Abstract:

Purpose - This paper seeks to determine common and unique activities, promotional methods, time management strategies, and best practices of academic librarians embedded in online courses at six institutions. Design/methodology/approach - This is a mixed methods study using both interviews and quantitative data to study the activities and experiences of embedded librarians at six institutions. Findings - The librarians and faculty involved in the embedded services reported unexpected benefits to the service. However, experiences with managing the time required for embedding along with regular reference duties varied, and scaling up the service from a few courses to a regular library service caused staffing issues for a few institutions. Research limitations/implications - This study was exploratory by nature and thus its scope was limited. Because only six institutions were studied, it is difficult to determine the true state of embedded librarianship in the USA. Future research should build on the foundation to determine outcomes for which embedded service is best suited and perform cost-benefit analyses. Practical implications - Because embedded services can become popular quickly, individual librarians should work with library administrators to determine whether staffing a full-scale service will be possible and plan accordingly. If a full-scale service is not feasible, the service scope may need to be limited (for instance, to core courses or to specific academic departments). Originality/value - Past research on embedded librarianship has been limited to single institutions or to purposes and outcomes of the service. This paper provides a comparative study of embedded librarians at six institutions, and concentrates on the librarian's experience at each.

Ebooks in Libraries: An Overview of the Current Situation

This journal article appeared in the January 2011 issue of Library Management (Volume 32, Issue (6/7).

Abstract:

Purpose - This paper aims to provide an overview of the current situation regarding ebooks in both academic and public libraries. Design/methodology/approach - The approach takes the form of a review of the literature, drawing together findings from various published ebook surveys conducted over the past three years. Findings - It was found that there is a need for libraries to raise awareness about the ebooks they offer and how they offer them. Practical implications - The paper points up the importance of librarians having accurate knowledge about their users' concerns, which can be complex over the spectrum of ebooks, in order to obtain the "best deal". Originality/value - The paper draws together viewpoints from academic libraries, public libraries and ebook suppliers.

This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Journal of Educational Technology & Society (Volume 14, Issue 3).

Abstract:

This study is a comparison of AUPress with three other traditional (non-open access) Canadian university presses. The analysis is based on the rankings that are correlated with book sales on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. Statistical methods include the sampling of the sales ranking of randomly selected books from each press. The results of one-way ANOVA analyses show that there is no significant difference in the ranking of printed books sold by AUPress in comparison with traditional university presses. However, AUPress, can demonstrate a significantly larger readership for its books as evidenced by the number of downloads of the open electronic versions.

Patron Driven Acquisition in Western Libraries

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The number of academic e-books has increased in the last few years and some vendors are now offering libraries the opportunity to provide access to these e-books through their library catalogue prior to purchasing the content. This method of acquiring material is called Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA). When an e-book has been accessed two times, the content is purchased by the library. This means that some of the electronic books you see in our catalogue will not be purchased and owned by Western until they are used.

Western Libraries has been experimenting with this form of acquisition since 2007. We have reviewed the books acquired in this manner, monitored the expenditure of funds and refined the process to the point where we are ready to incorporate this method of acquisition into our regular workflows beginning May 1, 2012. Below are some common questions and answers regarding this method of acquisition.

Why has Western Libraries decided to include this method of acquisition into our purchasing processes?
By waiting until this content is used before paying for it, Western Libraries will ensure some of the e-books we acquire are truly what our users need. Several studies have demonstrated that in the print world only about 40% of an academic library collection ever circulates. This will ensure that 100% of the content purchased in this way was used at least twice.

Another advantage is that we can offer access to material that may be considered of minor interest to our users and let the user decide whether it is useful material.

Are we still acquiring books in the traditional ways?
Yes. Patron Driven Acquisition will only be offered for a subset of our collection that fits specific criteria. Collections librarians (Christena McKillop and Denise Horoky are the collections librarians at the Education Library) will still purchase print and electronic material that does not fit the criteria for this new form of acquisition.

How are the e-book titles selected for this type of acquisition?
In order to ensure that Western Libraries is purchasing material appropriate for an academic library, the e-books selected for loading into the catalogue will be based on criteria established by the subject librarians. Christena McKillop and Denise Horoky are the subject specialists in the Education Library. Since we can offer access to a wider selection of material at no up-front cost you may notice some material that would not ordinarily have been purchased for the library (eg. symposia or textbooks). By offering this method of acquisition to our users, we are giving the users an opportunity to communicate to us what kind of material is important to them. This will be helpful when subject librarians make content selections for print books and e-books that do not fit the criteria for this acquisition model.

Can I tell which titles are not owned?
No. To the user the process of acquiring the material is entirely transparent and there is no way to tell whether a particular title is part of our unowned collection of e-books.

What if I just look at the Table of Contents but decide I don't need to use the book?
An "access" is counted when you actually enter into the book at the chapter or section level. Accessing the table of contents, the index or the title page of the book does not count as a use toward purchase.

There is no time limit on an access. If you enter the book and have it open for minutes or hours, print, or download (to the maximum allowed) only one access is counted. If you exit the book and then come back into it, a second access is counted.

What happens to the books that are never used?
At this time we do not have a limit on the number of months or years a title can remain in the catalogue if it's not used. If our vendor informs us that unpurchased titles must be removed from the catalogue the subject selectors (Christena and Denise) will carefully review the list of titles and purchase anything they feel should be added to our collection.

For books that are purchased, Western owns perpetual access rights to the content.


Who can I ask for more information?
You can speak to Christena McKillop or Denise Horoky in the Education Library.

Are Books Becoming Extinct in Academic Libraries?

This journal article appeared in the January 2012 issue of New Library World (Volume 113 Issue: 1/2).

Abstract:

Purpose - Academic librarians who are planning for the future need to be knowledgeable about the short- and long-range outlook for print. They must also consider what will happen if libraries abolish most or all of their books. This paper aims to explore current and future academic e-book usage, and to suggest ideas for response to collection changes. Design/methodology/approach - This article examines a wide range of studies and comments on this timely topic. Findings - The disparity between the reception of e-books in the general population and the adoption of them in the academic world suggests that print is still important to faculty and students. Given the advances in e-book technology, the increasing popularity of online/distance education courses, the adoption of the new EPUB 3 format, and the ubiquity of mobile devices, e-books are expected increasingly to replace print volumes in academic libraries. Originality/value - What has received little attention in the literature is the complexity of the issue of e-book reception in the academic world. This article looks at current and future e-book usage from the perspective of several large studies on diverse aspects of academic life, including students' perceptions of libraries, their information-seeking behaviors, faculty research habits and information needs, students' reading habits, and the impact of emerging technologies on teaching and learning. Providing insight into current and future academic e-book trends, this article suggests practical ways to respond to these trends.

Patron Driven Acquisition at Western Libraries

The number of academic e-books has increased in the last few years and some vendors are now offering libraries the opportunity to provide access to these e-books through their library catalogue prior to purchasing the content. This method of acquiring material is called Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA). When an e-book has been accessed two times, the content is purchased by the library. This means that some of the electronic books you see in our catalogue will not be purchased and owned by Western until they are used. write-your-own-ebook.jpg

Western Libraries has been experimenting with this form of acquisition since 2007. We have reviewed the books acquired in this manner, monitored the expenditure of funds and refined the process to the point where we are ready to incorporate this method of acquisition into our regular workflows beginning May 1, 2012. Below are some common questions and answers regarding this method of acquisition.


PISA Report #12 ~ Are Boys and Girls Ready for the Digital Age?

Information and communication technologies revolutionise not only the speed at which information can be transmitted, but also how information is conveyed and received. Technological innovations have a profound effect on the types of skills that are demanded in today's labour markets and the types of jobs that have the greatest potential for growth. Most of these jobs now require some familiarity with, if not mastery of, navigating through digital material where readers determine the structure of what they read rather than follow the preestablished order of text as presented in a book.

READ THE REPORT.

When you think of someone who is an engineer, do you imagine a man or a woman wearing a hardhat? How about when you imagine a teacher standing in front of a class of schoolchildren? If you answer "a man" to the first question, and "a woman" to the second, there's probably a reason. And the reason is simply that more men than women pursue careers in fields such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics, while women are over-represented in the humanities and medical sciences. This type of gender segregation in the labour market is still prevalent in many countries. But will it continue? Girls now do as well as, and often better than, boys in most core school subjects; and proficiency in a subject influences 15-year-olds' thinking about the kind of career they want to pursue. Or does it?


OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA)

Are students well prepared for future challenges?
Can they analyse, reason and communicate effectively?
Do they have the capacity to continue learning throughout life?


The Oganisation for Economic Cooperation's (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) answers these questions and more, through its surveys of 15-year-olds in the principal industrialised countries. Every three years, it assesses to what extent students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills essential for full participation in society.

PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) is an international study which began in the year 2000. It aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students in participating countries/economies. Since the year 2000 over 70 countries and economies have participated in PISA.

OECD iLibrary is OECD's Online Library for books, papers and statistics and the gateway to OECD's analysis and data. It replaces SourceOECD, and hosts all content so users can find - and cite - tables and databases as easily as articles or chapters.

OECD iLibrary contains all the publications and datasets released by OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), International Energy Agency (IEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), OECD Development Centre, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), and International Transport Forum (ITF).

The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

Enjoy National Film Board (NFB) documentaries, animations, alternative dramas and interactive productions on the web, on your personalized home page, or on your iPhone. Don't forget to check out the NFB trailers, playlists and upcoming online releases ~ free for personal use.

Announcing Scholars GeoPortal ~ A Data Discovery Tool

The Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) launched the live version of Scholars Geoportal (http://geo.scholarsportal.info/) on March 1st, 2012.

An excerpt from the press release describes the Geoportal as "an award-winning" geospatial data discovery tool allowing Ontario's university students and researchers to enrich their teaching and research by engaging with OCUL's growing collection of geospatial data. The portal offers search, preview, query, download and sharing functionality for datasets licensed by Ontario university libraries, covering such topics as land use, transportation networks, census boundaries, geology, soils, points of interest (such as healthcare facilities, schools, and airports), air photos, and more."

The full press release with project and product descriptions can be read at the OCUL site.

For GIS and data resources and assistance, please contact or visit the Map and Data Centre, Room 1051 Social Science Centre (on main campus).

Doing a literature review? We strongly encourage graduate students to book a research consultation appointment with the academic librarians for a personalized and customized information session about academic and scholarly database searching and efficient use of library research resources. You will be glad you did!

The Education Library's Recent News Feature

The Education Library's website has a RECENT NEWS feature that helps you keep up-to-date. We frequently highlight new books, useful websites, book lists related to your courses and just about any other education-related or library-related news items that catch our fancy.

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests.

The field of education is multidisciplinary. It is very often necessary (and sometimes mandatory) for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES LIST (for example you will also want to the search Dissertations and Theses and PsycINFO databases among others).

Getting started is easy!

If you are working off campus, please type in your Western Personal Computer Account user name and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website.

Under the caption RESEARCH TOOLS, click on the option "Databases"

Select one of the databases you want to search.

For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian information), ERIC or PsycINFO or ProQuest Education Journals to get started on your literature review.

Databases are "keyword friendly" - type in some of the concepts you are considering and see what kind of results you are getting. Planning your search ahead of time and capturing relevant terms will be extremely efficient when you sit down to search the databases. You may find other keywords just by glancing at the titles in your results list. If so, give those keywords a try. Other keywords can be taken from your course lectures, notes, peer-to-peer discussions, scholarly readings, or a visit with the academic research librarian at the Education Library.

Getting started is easy!

If you are working off campus, please type in your Western Personal Computer Account user name and password (the same ones you use to log into your Western email account) in the Off Campus Access option on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website.

Under the caption RESEARCH TOOLS, click on the option "Databases"

Select one of the databases you want to search. For example, you may want to search one of these databases CBCA Education (for Canadian information), ERIC or PsycINFO or ProQuest Education Journals to get started on your literature review.

Databases are "keyword friendly" - type in some of the concepts you are considering and see what kind of results you are getting. Planning your search ahead of time and capturing relevant terms will be extremely efficient when you sit down to search the databases. You may find other keywords just by glancing at the titles in your results list. If so, give those keywords a try. Other keywords can be taken from your course lectures, notes, peer-to-peer discussions, scholarly readings, or a visit with the academic librarian at the Education Library.


Doing a thorough literature review includes searching a database called Dissertations and Theses.

Reading the literature review of a thesis related to your topic, and following up on relevant references included in that thesis is another way to easily expand your literature review.

This database is a ProQuest product so if you have already search other ProQuest databases you can use the same search strategies. When you learn how to search one ProQuest product, you know how to search all their products.

This Dissertations and Theses database provides subject, title, and author access to almost all American dissertations accepted at an accredited institution since 1861. Masters theses have been selectively indexed since 1962. Abstracts are included for doctoral dissertation records from July 1980 to the present.

The full text of over 100,000 dissertations is available now at this Web site. In addition, the Dissertations and Theses database serves to disseminate citations for thousands of Canadian dissertations and an increasing number of papers accepted in institutions abroad.

Literature Review Using the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages.

All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles.

The education research coverage is growing annually.

You can easily locate DOAJ by clicking on the DATABASES link (there is an alphabetical list of all of the databases available to you) on the Western Libraries' website.

You will see the Program Guides link on the far left hand side of the Western Libraries' website. It is listed under the heading Research Tools.

When you click on the Program Guides link you will get a list of all of Western programs with a link to librarian-created program guides to help you get started with your research in your particular program.

The Education Library Program Guides provide you with a starting place for finding information for your assignments and research. We have created three Program Guides:

* Bachelor and Diploma in Education
* Continuing Teacher Education
* Education Graduate Program


To do a thorough multidisciplinary literature review - have a look at the other Program Guides, especially those listed under Social Sciences.

All of the databases available to Western students, staff and faculty members are listed on the DATABASES list on the Western Libraries' website. You must have a UWO username and password to use these research databases (these are the same as your UWO email).

The DATABASES list (found on the far left hand side of the web site) is an alphabetical list of all of the research databases that are can be search when looking for scholarly research information for your assignments and thesis work. You will also find a list of databases by subject. These subject lists are very helpful for multidisciplinary research.

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Of course, since the field of education is so multidisciplinary it is necessary to search other subject databases on the DATABASES list (e.g., Dissertations and Theses or PsycINFO)

Personalized and Customized Research Consultations for Graduate Students

Doing a literature review? We strongly encourage graduate students to book a research consultation appointment with the academic librarians for a personalized and customized information session about database searching and efficient use of library research resources. You will be glad you did!

WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM (Video) by Steven Johnson

I have a hunch you might enjoy this four minute video: One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on - in exhilarating style - one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from?

National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES)

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education.

Database ~ LGBT Life® with Full Text

LGBT Life® with Full Text contains all of the content available in LGBT Life as well as full text for more than 120 of the most important and historically significant LGBT journals, magazines and regional newspapers, as well as more than 150 full-text monographs and books. The database includes comprehensive indexing and abstract coverage as well as a specialized LGBT Thesaurus containing over 6,400 terms.

Ulrich's Periodicals Directory (aka Ulrichsweb)

What is Ulrichsweb?


Ulrichsweb is an easy to search source of detailed information on more than 300,000 periodicals (also called serials) of all types: academic and scholarly journals, e-journals, peer-reviewed titles, popular magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and more.


What does it include?


Ulrichsweb covers more than 900 subject areas. Ulrich's records provide data points such as ISSN, publisher, language, subject, abstracting & indexing coverage, full-text database coverage, tables of contents, and reviews written by librarians.

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually.

Canadian Public Policy Collection

The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

The Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (CRTLHE) promotes an evidence-based approach to teaching and learning in post-secondary education.

Under the leadership of Debra Dawson, the current director of the Teaching Support Centre (TSC), this new Centre consists of staff and faculty members from a variety of disciplinary perspectives who engage in research designed to advance the understanding and, ultimately, the practice of teaching and learning in higher education.

The research focus on teaching and learning is broadly defined including both curricular and co-curricular endeavours. This expansive lens allows a comprehensive understanding of teaching and learning within the post-secondary context.

Current research includes several Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) funded research projects on the impact of a variety of teaching programs involving faculty and graduate students on enhancing teaching and learning.

This Centre is a collaborative partnership with the Faculty of Education.

Information about Western's Teaching Support Centre (TSC)

The Teaching Support Centre works collaboratively with faculty, graduate students, and staff to advance teaching and learning at The University of Western Ontario. The TSC is the teaching 'heart' of the University. Our partnership with Western Libraries and Information Technology Services (Instructional Technology Resource Centre) provides us with a unique foundation to deliver support in three important areas:

1. Instructional/curriculum development and the scholarship of teaching,
2. Learning technologies and online course development,
3. Information literacy and research skill development.

If you are involved in teaching at The University of Western Ontario, we look forward to working with you! Come see us in the Centre in The D.B. Weldon Library.

Friday, January 20, 2012
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Room 121, The D.B. Weldon Library


The panel will explore the interpersonal and intercultural dimensions of establishing and continuing collaboration internationally, and address, among others:

• the rewards and challenges of working with colleagues from around the world
• strategies to successfully bridge differences in institutional, disciplinary and national cultures
• how to prepare before visiting the overseas partners
• navigating cultural differences in communication styles while maintaining partnerships with colleagues overseas
• preparing students and colleagues for cultural transitions (pre-departure and upon return from overseas)

Presenters:

Dr. David Cechetto
Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Director of Rebuilding Health in Rwanda
Rebuilding Health in Rwanda was initiated in 2004 to facilitate capacity building in the nursing and medical schools in Rwanda, including educating nurses at the Kigali Health Institute and training doctors at the National University of Rwanda.

Dr. Greg Moran
Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Science
Dr. Moran will take on the position of provost at Aga Khan University in July 2012. Aga Khan is a private university that promotes human welfare through research, teaching and community service, with campuses and programs in Afghanistan, East Africa, Egypt, Pakistan, Syria and the United Kingdom. From his new office in Nairobi, Kenya, Dr. Moran will continue a connection with Western as a special advisor on developing partnerships with universities internationally.

Western ~ Visual Identity Review ~ A Message From Our President

Amit Chakma writes:

Thank you to our faculty, staff, students and alumni who, since Summer 2010, have participated in Western's strategic communications review. We appreciate having your perspective to better understand how we tell Western's story by highlighting the teaching and research that occurs on campus and the impact that work is having nationally and internationally.


Western is a complex organization with multiple identities and symbols, which sometimes hinders our ability to communicate the impact of the University as a whole. Establishing a more unified visual identity for Western will strengthen our ability to gain greater recognition for our world-class research and teaching that is making a difference both at home and abroad.

This article, co-authored by Rachel Heydon and Rosamund Stooke, appears in the January 2012 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education (Volume 28, Number 1).

Abstract:

This paper reports on a case study of teachers' expressions of their literacy-related professional development needs in a First Nations school located in Ontario, Canada. The paper construes the work of the teachers as "border work" and argues that their literacy teaching work was complex and tied to an ongoing legacy of colonialism. Four interrelated themes are discussed. The paper recommends improving compensation and job security for educators in First Nations schools and supporting them to see themselves as knowledgeable professionals who can entertain sophisticated notions of literacy that consider its relationship to situation including culture.

Sites We Like ~ The National Adult Literacy Database (NALD)

The National Adult Literacy Database (NALD) Inc. is a Canadian non-profit registered charity. NALD's mission is to provide Internet-based literacy and essential skills information and resources in both of Canada's official languages.

Sites We Like ~ Reality 101 Blog

This information is from their website:

Reality 101 is a blog written for new special education teachers, by new special education teachers. It is maintained by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), the premier association for special education professionals.


The Reality 101 bloggers are CEC members -- all in their first, second, or third year in the field -- who have been selected to share their experiences with the special education community for an entire school year. There will be successes and challenges, ups and downs . . . but no matter what, their stories will showcase just how rewarding a career in special education can be.

We strongly encourage graduate students to book a research consultation appointment with the academic librarians for a personalized and customized information session about database searching and efficient use of library research resources. You will be glad you did!

New Book ~ Growing Up with Domestic Violence

"Growing Up with Domestic Violence" is authored by Peter Jaffe, David A. Wolfe and Marcie Campbell.

Information from the publisher:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) can have a profound impact on the children - this book shows to recognize these effects and provide effective clinical interventions and preventive measures.

This compact and easy-to-read text by leading experts shows practitioners and students how to recognize the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on children and youth and to provide effective clinical interventions and school-based prevention programs.

Exposure to IPV is defined using examples from different ages and developmental stages. The book describes the effects of exposure to IPV and reviews epidemiology and etiology. Its main focus is on proven assessment, intervention, and prevention strategies. Relevant and current theories regarding the impact of exposure on children and youth are reviewed, and illustrative real-life case studies from the clinical experiences of the authors are described.

People We Know: Farahnaz Faez

Farahnaz Faez published "Points of Departure: Developing the Knowledge Base of ESL and FSL Teachers for K-12 Programs in Canada" in the The Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics (Volume 14, Issue 1, 2011). Please use the ProQuest link in the catalogue record to get this most current issue.

Abstract:

In this paper, I examine the contextual factors that impact the development of knowledge base of teachers of English as a second language (ESL) and French as a second language (FSL) for teaching in Kindergarten through Grade 12 programs in Ontario. Using a sociocultural orientation to second language teacher education and prominent knowledge base frameworks from the field, I discuss how a variety of local contextual factors impact the development of teacher candidates' (TC) knowledge base in pre-service teacher education programs in Canada. Individual factors include: the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of candidates' in ESL and FSL programs, the TCs' language proficiency in the target language, their personal experiences and understanding of language development, and their familiarity with real life experiences of ESL and FSL students. Beyond their own experiences, integral to TCs knowledge base are the range of student populations they could serve and the variety of language teaching contexts they can encounter in the Ontario context. I discuss the implications of such nuances for policy and practice in language teacher education programs across Canada.

OECD iLibrary

OECD iLibrary is OECD's Online Library for books, papers and statistics and the gateway to OECD's analysis and data. It replaces SourceOECD, and hosts all content so users can find - and cite - tables and databases as easily as articles or chapters.

OECD iLibrary contains all the publications and datasets released by OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), International Energy Agency (IEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), OECD Development Centre, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), and International Transport Forum (ITF).

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western is a multi-functional portal that collects, showcases, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by The University of Western Ontario community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing and broaden the international recognition of Western's academic excellence by providing open access to Western's intellectual output and professional achievements.

MITx: The Next Chapter for University Credentialing?

This article appeared in Inside Higher Education on December 19, 2011 - 3:36pm. It was written by Audrey Watters.


Holiday Hiatus

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
See you again on these pages in early January 2012.

"Save Library and Archives Canada" Campaign

The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) unveiled a national campaign to protect Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

"Save Library and Archives Canada" is being launched by CAUT in response to funding cuts and internal managerial decisions that are threatening the quality and integrity of Canada's only national public library and archives.

"Badly conceived restructuring, a narrowing of its mandate, and financial cutbacks are undermining LAC's ability to acquire, preserve and make publicly available Canada's full documentary heritage," James L. Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers said at a news conference in Ottawa.

These changes, Turk added, have already led to a reduction in the number of specialist archivists and librarians, reduced public access and services, and the loss of rare and important materials.

Teaching Innovation Projects (TIPS) Journal

TIPS is an open-access journal arising from the Advanced Teaching Program within the Teaching Support Centre of The University of Western Ontario.

It publishes articles that describe the scholarly and pedagogical foundations for workshops about a variety of timely educational topics and include a comprehensive list of learning outcomes, an annotated review of relevant literature, and a detailed breakdown of potential learning activities among other elements.


The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success

The book "The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success" is a clear, understandable six-step method for streamlining the literature review process! Click on the title link above to find the call number and the circulation status (is it signed out to a student or not?) of this book.

Written in user-friendly language, this book offers master's and doctoral level students in education and the social sciences a road map to developing and writing an effective literature review for a research project, thesis, or dissertation.

Organized around a comprehensive and detailed six-step developmental model, the book provides guided exercises, graphics, charts, and examples from the everyday experiences of practitioners.

Both novice and experienced researchers will find invaluable assistance for:

Selecting a topic
Searching the literature
Developing arguments
Surveying the literature
Critiquing the literature
Writing the literature review


And, of course, for more personalized help about your particular research interests, you can always call or email to arrange a research consultation with one of the Education Academic Librarians - you will be glad you did!

RefWorks Problems

RefWorks is not working as it should and you may encounter some problems when working with the software. The appropriate people have been notified and they are working on a solution. Unfortunately, there is no timeline for resolution.

The Education Library on Facebook

The Education Library's Facebook page is constantly updated - have a look! The content on our Facebook page is very different from the content of this Blog, and very different from the information we provide under our RECENT NEWS heading on the Education Library's website.

This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of The Journal of School Health (Volume 81, Number 5).

Abstract:

Adolescent school victimization due to lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) status is commonplace, and is associated with compromised health and adjustment. Few studies have examined the long-term implications of LGBT school victimization for young adult adjustment. We examine the association between reports of LGBT school victimization and young adult psychosocial health and risk behavior. The young adult survey from the Family Acceptance Project included 245 LGBT young adults between the ages of 21 and 25 years, with an equal proportion of Latino and non-Latino White respondents. A 10-item retrospective scale assessed school victimization due to actual or perceived LGBT identity between the ages of 13 and 19 years. Multiple regression was used to test the association between LGBT school victimization and young adult depression, suicidal ideation, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social integration, while controlling for background characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine young adult suicide attempts, clinical levels of depression, heavy drinking and substance use problems, sexually transmitted disease (STD) diagnoses, and self-reported HIV risk. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender-related school victimization is strongly linked to young adult mental health and risk for STDs and HIV; there is no strong association with substance use or abuse. Elevated levels of depression and suicidal ideation among males can be explained by their high rates of LGBT school victimization. Reducing LGBT-related school victimization will likely result in significant long-term health gains and will reduce health disparities for LGBT people. Reducing the dramatic disparities for LGBT youth should be educational and public health priorities.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: Hispanic Americans, Teenagers, Mental health, Gays & lesbians, Sexual behavior, Transgendered persons, Young adults, Adjustment

This article appeared in the June 2011 issue of School Psychology Quarterly (Volume 26, Number 2).

Abstract:

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to lower levels of problematic substance use, depressive symptoms, and psychological distress. Using a sample of 145 LGBT youth recruited from college and university organizations for LGBT students, we examined whether attending a high school with a GSA was related to more positive school experiences and mental health outcomes for LGBT youth. The results indicate that youth who attended a high school with a GSA report significantly more favorable outcomes related to school experiences, alcohol use, and psychological distress. The implications of the findings are discussed as they relate to school psychologists. Important limitations of this study are reviewed.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: At risk youth, LGBTQ studies, Health behavior, Educational psychology, Student organizations

This journal article appeared in the July - September 2011 issue of Reading Research Quarterly (Volume 46, Number 3).

Abstract:

Scholars have argued for reading and discussing children's and young adult literature containing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or questioning (LGBTQ) characters and related themes with youths. Yet, we know very little about how to do this among LGBTQ people and their allies. This study examined 18 transcripts of talk from a literature discussion group of 32 adolescents and adults, including the authors, using 24 texts over 3 years in an LGBTQ youth center. The goal was to identify the nature of the talk and the ways it was liberatory and/or oppressive. A Foucaultian analysis of the talk, combined with ethnographically collected information, was conducted, identifying discourses, uses, and ways of operating to reveal possibilities and limitations of LGBT-inclusive and queering discourses. Findings suggest a complex, reciprocal process among texts, talk, and context in which no discourse is monolithically liberatory or oppressive. Complementary and competing discourses in conversation with each other around diverse texts and in complex contexts, however, provide opportunities for conflicts and potential for change.

This article appeared in the July/August 2011 issue of Journal of College Student Development (Volume 52, Number 4).

Abstract:

Using Renn's (2000, 2004) ecology of college student development model as a theoretical framework, I report and discuss the findings of my study involving 6 female college students who identify as multiracial/biracial-bisexual/pansexual. I describe how these findings validate Renn's model, specifically discussing how the campus environment influenced the students' identity development in relation to three themes that emerged from my study: trying on, negotiating self, and finding fit. Finally, I discuss the implications of the results of my study for student affairs practice.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: College students, Bisexuality, Studies, Race relations, Ecology, Research & development--R&D, Society, Sexuality, Homosexuality

This journal article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Family Relations (Volume 60, Number 3).

Abstract:

This study examined the effects of social support components and providers on mental health and sexual orientation (SO) milestones of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths. Data were collected on 461 self-identified LGB adolescents and young adults. Family acceptance and support yielded the strongest positive effect on self-acceptance of SO, whereas friends' support and acceptance yielded the strongest positive effect on disclosure of SO. Family support had the strongest negative effect on youth's mental distress, whereas friends' and family support had the strongest positive effect on well-being. These findings highlight the importance of the daily perceptions of LGB youth within social and familial settings, indicating that both positive and negative aspects of support affect youths' mental health and identity development.

These are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this article: Stress, Social support, Studies, Mental health, Sexual orientation, Homophobia, Attitudes, Consolidation

This journal article appeared in the September 2011 issue of Intervention in School and Clinic (Volume 47, Number 1).

Abstract:

Adolescence is an important time in human development. Teenagers spend much time questioning their core belief structures and developing the foundations of their identity. For students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), this path of development is difficult in American schools because of strongly held homophobic beliefs. Barriers in sexuality identity development could cause problems for students with disabilities, including low self-esteem, psychological problems, and suicidal ideations. This article addresses action steps that educators can take to support this student population.

Here are the keywords/phrases that have been assigned to this journal article: sexuality education, cultural and linguistic diversity, classroom management, classroom environment

This article appeared in the October 2011 issue of JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (Volume 82, Number 8).

Abstract:

It cannot be ignored that some individuals in our society, including among the children and teens we teach and coach, are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT). Being LGBT is just another difference among students (such as race, mental/physical challenges, gender, or religion) that teachers and coaches must acknowledge and address. Homosexuality and homophobia are rarely discussed in schools, yet they are relevant in motor-development and motor-learning settings because people hold gender-stereotyped beliefs about movement and about LGBT individuals. Few educational curricula address these topics directly, yet we expect physical education teachers and coaches to know how to deal with these differences among their students.


In this article, I will address homophobia and related stereotypes in physical education settings by identifying several misconceptions people hold about sex, gender, and homosexuality; describing stereotypical gender-specific expressions about movement; and providing suggestions for teachers to help children and parents develop movement freely.

This article appears in the December 2011 issue of Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (Volume 28, Number 6).

Abstract:

Sexual minorities are overrepresented among the runaway population, and sexual minority runaways are at greater risk for adverse health outcomes than their heterosexual peers. Our knowledge of this vulnerable population has been restricted by methodological limitations of existing studies. This study used a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents to explore the association between same-sex romantic attractions and relationships and run away behavior over a 2 year period. Results indicated that although the association between sexual orientation and running away appears to be partially attenuated by other risk factors for running away, there remains a significant positive association between same-sex romantic attractions and running away. Furthermore, youth with no romantic or sexual relationships were significantly less likely to report running away compared to youth with only opposite-sex relationships. These associations remained significant even after controlling for other risk factors.

The KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal are Runaways,Sexual minorities, Adolescents, Adolescent Health

This journal article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Family Relations (Volume 60, Issue 4).

Abstract:

A positive attachment to one's residential community has been linked to better mental health (McLaren, 2009), stronger social support (Young, Russell, & Powers, 2004), and a higher quality of life (Mak, Cheung, & Law, 2009). Attachment to residential community has been understudied in research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families. The current study attempts to fill this gap by using family and minority stress theories to examine the predictors of residential community attachment among 77 lesbian mothers living in nonmetropolitan communities. Our findings indicate that stronger residential community attachment is predicted by more frequent contact with family of origin, low religiosity, and an interaction between close LGBT friendships and the presence of at least one local LGBT organization. Contrary to expectations, anti-LGBT victimization perpetrated by community members did not have an effect on residential community attachment.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this article: attachment to community; family of origin; LGBT community; lesbian mothers; nonmetropolitan; religiosity

This journal article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Educational Researcher (Volume 40, Number 7).

Abstract:

This study finds that, compared with straight-identified youth, youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) are at greater risk of suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, victimization by peers, and elevated levels of unexcused absences from school. Results disaggregated by LGBTQ subgroups reveal heterogeneity within the broad LGBTQ group, with bisexual youth appearing to be particularly at risk. Also, although the risk gaps in school belongingness and unexcused absences are significant in high school, we find that these gaps are significantly greater in middle school, suggesting heightened early risk for LGBTQ-identified students. By raising awareness of educational inequities related to LGBTQ identification, this study lays the descriptive groundwork for interventions aimed at improving psychological and educational outcomes for these students.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: at-risk students, gay/lesbian studies, multilevel modeling, stress/coping

This article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Journal of Community Psychology (Volume 39, Issue 8).

Abstract:

This study explores the experiences and support needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people living in Sussex (UK), and the training needs of practitioners working with LGBTQ young people. The aims were to explore the experiences of young people including bullying, "coming out," social service and educational needs, and to investigate how practitioners view the needs of LGBTQ young people. Twenty-nine interviews were conducted and analyzed thematically. Participants stressed the social and health impact of discrimination and bullying on young people as well as barriers faced in accessing services. Young people require support, yet practitioners lack the training to provide that support. Practitioners are open to this training and both groups of participants believe effective training should include youth in the development and delivery. There is an urgent need for the development of appropriate and dedicated LGBTQ youth training for all practitioners working with young people.

This journal article appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of Sociological Perspectives (Volume 54, Number 3).

Abstract:

Drawing on an integrated theoretical lens of vocabularies of motive, gender interactionism, and queer theory, the authors explore how eighteen lesbian mothers and twenty-two gay fathers negotiate the cultural narratives of heteronormativity and gender essentialism as they imagine and participate in constructing their children's gender. Findings highlight the extent to which participants' parenting fantasies and realities occur within a context of heightened gender accountability that they manage for their children. The authors show how the practice of securing gender role models for their children is one way that non-heterosexual parents manage this accountability. Next, the authors introduce "queer ruptures" in participants' narratives and detail the subtle ways that they destabilize the existing heteronormative gender order. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for empirical and theoretical development.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Parents & parenting, Sociology, Sex roles, Gays & lesbians, Children & youth

This journal article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Canadian Psychology (Volume 52, Number 4).

Abstract:

In Canadian counselling psychology, the idea of developing MCC in order to work with clients in a more culturally sensitive manner is the most widely used approach. However, some Canadian scholars have reservations about infusing traditional counselling models with specific cultural competencies (e.g., McCormick & Gerlitz, 2009). According to Peavy (1998), traditional approaches that are adapted for counselling with culturally diverse clients are insufficient and even harmful. As a result, Peavy (2003) proposed the idea of intercultural counselling wherein both counsellor and client's interpersonal and communication styles are emphasised. This approach puts forth four tenets for effective intercultural counselling, including (a) the counsellor's ability to navigate two cultures, (b) unification of intercultural counselling principals, (c) inclusion of an emancipatory theme in counselling, and (d) the integration of constructivist counselling practices. Furthermore, Peavy and Li (2003) discussed the five culturalcontextual issues of self-constructural (client self-concept construction based on an individualistic or collectivistic culture), communication and miscommunication, silence, turn-taking and interrupting, as well as grounding (establishing common ground), which they believe are core to intercultural counselling. Ultimately, Peavy and Li (2003) argue that social-contextual factors and the collaborative nature of the helping process are key when engaging in multicultural counselling.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Careers, Multiculturalism & pluralism, Counseling psychology, Psychologists

This journal article appears in the December 2011 issue of Youth Justice (Volume 11, Number 3).

Abstract:

This paper explores how visibly transgressing heteronormativity shapes police interactions with LGBT young people. While research provides evidence about how sexually and gender diverse bodies can be abused in schools, policing is overlooked. Interviews with 35 LGBT young people demonstrate how bodies transgressing heteronormativity (that is, non-heteronormative bodies) mediate their policing experiences in Queensland, Australia. Drawing on Foucault, Butler, and others, this article suggests police interactions and use of discretion with LGBT young people was informed by non-heteronormative bodies discursively performing queerness in ways read by police. The article concludes noting tensions produced for youthful LGBT bodies in public spaces.

These are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: embodiment, heteronormativity, lesbian gay bisexual transgender (LGBT), police, queer

This journal article appears in a 2011 issue of Applied Developmental Science (Volume 15, Number 4).

Abstract:

Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are student-led, school-based clubs that aim to provide a safe environment in the school context for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, as well as their straight allies. The present study examines the potential for GSAs to support positive youth development and to reduce associations among LGBT-specific school victimization and negative young adult well-being. The sample includes 245 LGBT young adults, ages 21-25, who retrospectively reported on the presence of a GSA in their high school, their participation in their school's GSA, and their perceptions of whether or not their GSA was effective in improving school safety. Findings revealed that the presence of a GSA, participation in a GSA, and perceived GSA effectiveness in promoting school safety were differentially associated with young adult well-being and, in some cases, buffered the negative association between LGBT-specific school victimization and well-being. Implications for future research and schools are discussed.

OECD iLibrary Database

OECD iLibrary is OECD's Online Library for books, papers and statistics and the gateway to OECD's analysis and data. It replaces SourceOECD, and hosts all content so users can find - and cite - tables and databases as easily as articles or chapters.

OECD iLibrary contains all the publications and datasets released by OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development), International Energy Agency (IEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), OECD Development Centre, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), and International Transport Forum (ITF).

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals and aims comprehensive coverage for all subjects and languages. All open access journals included in DOAJ allow users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles. The education research coverage is growing annually.

You can easily locate DOAJ by clicking on the DATABASES link (there is an alphabetical list of all of the databases available to you) on the Western Libraries' website.

Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this resource to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find scholarly and peer-reviewed journal articles for your literature reviews for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests. The field of education is multi-disciplinary and it is very often necessary for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list.

People We Know ~ Special Issue of Language and Literacy

The 2011 issue of Language and Literacy (Volume 13, Number 2) is a Special Issue: Ethical and Social Justice Issues in Language and Literacy Research.

This journal article appears in the July 2100 issue of Education, Citizenship and Social Justice (Volume 6, Number 2).

Abstract:

In 2003, the Ontario Ministry of Education in Canada began promoting popular media as a pedagogical tool, especially for 'reluctant' readers. This 'pedagogy of the popular' is instituted within a critical media literacy framework that draws on the values and codes of multiculturalism to counter the consumerist messages students encounter in nontraditional texts. The model of civic citizenship promoted by the critical media literacy curriculum, however, fails in its ambitions to provide a counterweight to the neo-liberal model of consumer citizenship. Insofar as its critique is grounded in a multicultural politics of representation, Ontario's media literacy curriculum fails to deeply interrogate the social roots of conflict and discrimination. As a result, it only weakly challenges, and is unlikely to displace, the post-Keynesian-era model of citizenship education in which the values of universality and inclusiveness are subsumed to an ethos that naturalizes the practices and moral codes of the marketplace.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this article: citizenship education, critical media literacy, multiculturalism, popular media

This article appeared in the August 2011 issue of the Journal of Educational Change (Volume 12, Number 3).

Abstract:

The education of minority students is of considerable interest within the literature. Ensuring that all children receive quality programming and that they successfully graduate from school is of concern for parents, educational stakeholders, and society alike. In Canada, the indigenous populations of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (FNMI) students have fallen significantly short of acceptable graduation rates. In an attempt to address this issue, results from 16 selected projects funded by the Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) that focused upon FNMI Education will be discussed. A comprehensive review of the projects suggests that by involving Aboriginal parents and Elders in meaningful ways and by focusing upon Aboriginal language, culture, and history not as an "add-on" but an integral part of Canadian history and culture, Aboriginal students are more likely to remain in school.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: First Nations, Métis, and Inuit education, indigenous education, High school completion

This journal article appeared in the April 2010 issue of the Alberta Journal of Educational Research (Volume 56, Number 1).

Abstract:

The education of First Nations students in Canada on reserve is the legal responsibility of the federal government. This article reviews and critiques the federal government's past and current special education policies and practices in regard to First Nations schools throughout Canada. The author has found that rather than establishing a comprehensive special education system for First Nations schools, the federal government has focused on limiting funding, services, and development. Four themes emerge from this review: (a) lack of willingness on the part of the federal government to honor constitutional obligations and responsibilities in special education to First Nations; (b) focus of providing provincial level of special education services resulted in little consultation with First Nations; (c) limited funding, and (d) lack of respect for First Nations expertise.

Here is a list of the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article:

Financial Support
Special Education
Foreign Countries
Special Needs Students
Government Role
Educational Policy
Resource Allocation
Canada Natives
Federal Government
Legal Responsibility

This article appeared in the December 2010 issue of Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce, suppl. Special Issue for ICEP 2010 (International Conference, Volume 15, Number 3).

Abstract:

For the indigenous peoples of the Great Canadian North, living far from the major service centers, web sites are essential vehicles for accessing information on health. Ensuring quality design of the websites on health for the indigenous peoples, besides ensuring the quality of their information content, necessitate to adapt their presentation to the cultural context, to define access to the web sites that take into consideration the conditions of particular environment, and establish links with the traditional medicine. This study identifies the foundation that should underlie the development of these websites.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article: Indigenous peoples, aboriginal culture, health websites, websites design, traditional medicine, user-centered approach.

This journal article appeared in the June 2011 issue of Journal of Child and Family Studies (Volume 20, Number 3).

Abstract:

The development of preschool children of Aboriginal heritage is jeopardized by the inter-generational transmission of risk that has created, and continues to create, social disadvantage. Early intervention programs are intended to mitigate the impact of social disadvantage. Yet, evidence of the effectiveness of these programs for children of Aboriginal heritage is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a two-generation, multi-cultural preschool program on 45 children of Aboriginal heritage and their caregivers. We used a single-group, pretest (program intake)/posttest (program exit) design with follow-up when the children were 7 years old. We used an observational measure of child receptive language (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III) and caregiver-reported measures of child development (Nipissing District Developmental Screen), risk for child maltreatment (Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory; AAPI), parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index; PSI), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale; RSE), and life skills (Community Life Skills scale; CLS). Using paired t-tests we found statistically significant increases in child receptive language scores between intake and exit, and repeated-measures ANOVA showed that these improvements were maintained up to age 7 years. For caregivers, Pearson's correlations demonstrated that risk for child maltreatment, parenting stress, self-esteem, and life skills were stable over time. Results of this study suggest that children of Aboriginal heritage can benefit from participation in a two-generation, multi-cultural preschool program. Their caregivers may have received greater benefit if issues of intergenerational transmission of the negative influences of residential schools were addressed as part of programming.

Here are the KEYWORDS/PHRASES that have been assigned to this journal article:
Aboriginal - Preschool children, Parents - Intervention studies, Poverty

This paper is available online in a current issue of the International Journal of Inclusive Education

Abstract:

The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice‐oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism‐as‐culture movement. Using both these conventional and somewhat unconventional views of disability, a self‐reflective case study was conducted in which the author attempted to facilitate an inclusive pedagogy in a university class, 'Working with Diversity and Difference'. At course conclusion, the author explored teacher candidates' notions of disablement and inclusive practices/strategies. Data sources included five focus group transcripts, 12 weeks of online discussion board postings and eight student assignments, namely inclusive teacher resource files. Data were triangulated and second‐level member checks completed. Some students reported how the pedagogy enabled a reflective practice such that it disrupted their ableistic educational impulses, while others talked more about specific classroom implications to facilitate inclusion. Interestingly, when most students entered into the inclusive conversation beginning from a particular exceptionality, label, or diagnosis (such as intellectual disability), they tended to do so exclusively from an individualised medical model view of disability. Implications for inclusive teacher education pedagogies are discussed.

KEYWORDS/PHRASES assigned to this article: First Nations views of disability, disability studies in education, autism pride/autism‐as‐culture, teacher education, teacher candidates

This paper appears in a current 2011 issue of International Journal of Inclusive Education.

Abstract:

This paper provides a historical review of the education system in Canada and its impact on Indigenous women. By doing so, I hope to address the inequities that surround current educational policies and practices. Also in this paper, I critically investigate the salient aspects of the educational experiences of the women in a contemporary context, with their voices and experiences at the forefront, thereby challenging all of us to envision a formal education system that creates space in which women of Aboriginal ancestry are treated fairly and equitably. (this abstract is from the author)

KEYWORDS assigned to this paper: Aboriginal education, anti-colonial pedagogy, ethnicity, race

Aboriginal Education in Canada: A Postcolonial Analysis

This paper appears in the 2011 issue of AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship (Volume 7, Number 1).

Abstract:

The Australian and Canadian Aboriginal communities are strikingly similar vis-à-vis traditional lifestyles, social structures and histories of victimization during colonization (Morrisette, McKenzie, & Morrisette, 2010). A cultural context, then, means "an emphasis on historical reconstruction based on an understanding of colonialism to alter the stereotypes and false beliefs given to Aboriginal people, and on culture and traditions as restorative to an individual's identity and self-esteem" (Morrisette et al., 2010, p. 98). At present, both communities suffer similar problems of unemployment, alcoholism, drug abuse, sex abuse, mental illness, suicide and racism. In this paper we explore the contribution of Australian Government policies to the lack of progress in Australia. (Abstract from the author)


The following KEYWORDS have been assigned to this journal article: Indigenous peoples, social structure, communities, unemployment, self-esteem

This article appeared in the September 2011 issue Social Indicators Research (Volume 103, Number 2).

Abstract:

The aim of the current paper was to examine the equivalence of the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a teacher rating measure of school readiness, forAboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. The current study used an approach, which analyzes the structure and properties of the EDI at the subdomain level. Similar subdomain score distributions would suggest that the EDI measures subdomains similarly for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal groups, whereas systematic variations in distributions would suggest the presence of bias at the subdomain level. The EDI was completed on a population of kindergarteners in 2003 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Results indicate that mean scores for all the domains and subdomains were significantly lower for Aboriginal children. However, the distributions of subdomains in which children were rated as 'challenges exist' were similar among both groups. The findings suggest an equivalent structure of the EDI at the subdomains level for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. The next step is to examine the specific correlates, beyond the structure of the EDI, that are associated with disparities in EDI subdomain scores, such as contextual factors and social conditions.


The following may be useful to you as you continue researching and searching the online databases - here are the KEYWORDS assigned to this article - Aboriginal student achievement, Aboriginal languages and student identity, teacher education, child development, Aboriginal populations, culture, School readiness

This article appeared in the October 2010 issue of the Canadian Journal of Education (Volume 33, Number 2).

Abstract:

There is a crisis relevant to the publicly funded education of Aboriginal students in Ontario. This article, which presents the details of the crisis, analyzes recent policy statements released by the Ontario Ministry of Education designed to address that crisis. By defining the nature of this critical juncture, presenting how these policies may be "widening the void" rather than "closing the gap," and offering opportunities to respond by improving the capabilities of teachers to enact those policies in their classrooms, the authors appeal to school boards, faculty associations, as well as Deans of Education, to act decisively to support Aboriginal self-determination.


The following may be useful to you as you continue researching and searching the online databases - here are the KEYWORDS assigned to this article: Aboriginal student achievement, Aboriginal languages and student identity, teacher education

The Aboriginal peoples of Canada, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, comprise the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada. These distinct groups have unique heritages, languages, cultures. Statistical information is available for the total Aboriginal population and each of the three groups. Information is also available on age, sex, geographical locations, and historical data where available.

Attention New PhD Candidates: Canadian Public Policy Collection

This collection is useful for almost every researcher interested in Canadian policy, but our graduate students here at the Faculty of Education who are interested in researching in the area of Aboriginal Education will find this a rich resource of information and data.


The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

The Summon search engine is the default on the Western Libraries' homepage. Summon was introduced in the late summer and early fall 2011. Here is more information about the Summon search engine and information for providing feedback about this product.

Here is a link to the Social Justice and Peace Studies Program Page. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting these programs.

Here is a link to the Women's Studies and Feminist Research Program Guide. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting these programs.

Attention New PhD Candidates: First Nations Studies Program Guide

Here is the link to the First Nations Studies Program Guide. Please note the contact information for the Academic Librarian supporting First Nations Studies at Western.

The Academic Librarians at Western have created Program Guides for each of the programs supported by Western. These Program Guides are a great place to start your research. The link to the Program Guides resides on the Western Libraries website and on the Education Library web pages.

You have a whole team of Academic Librarians supporting you!

Here is the RefWorks Account SetUp page that also includes amazing help documentation for how to use RefWorks.

Publishing Opportunities Database

Seeking a home for your research?


The Publishing Opportunities Database provides regularly updated listings of publishing and presentation opportunities for students and professors interested in presenting and publishing their research papers.

The database combines information from three distinct sources, presented in a convenient, intuitive format:

- Journal Calls for Papers - open opportunities for regularly published journals, to which content is constantly being added

- Conference Calls for Papers - time-sensitive content, providing from 3,000 - 4,000 records

- Special Issue Calls for Papers - time sensitive content with from 500 - 800 records available

Searches can be filtered by a variety of options, including conference location, submission date, medium of publication, language of publication, and more.

Sites We Like ~ EDUCAUSE

EDUCAUSE® is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology. EDUCAUSE helps those who lead, manage, and use information resources to shape strategic decisions at every level.

Getting Started: Searching the Library Catalogue

Looking for a book by a specific author?
Looking for a specific book title?
Looking for resources on a specific topic?
Looking for a specific journal title?
Looking for any books on a particular topic?

If you nodded "yes" to any of these questions, you want to begin your research by becoming familiar with our Library Catalogue.

We highly recommend that you click the CATALOGUE option at the top of the Western Libraries' website.

You can search the CATALOGUE by book title, journal title, author and keyword, and there are amazing "limiting" features that help you focus your search strategy also.

Research Support ~ Canadian Public Policy Collection

The Canadian Public Policy Collection is a collection of monograph/book publications from Canadian public policy institutes, government agencies, advocacy groups, think-tanks, university research centres and other public interest groups. The organizations included in this collection represent the leading edge of primary research and opinion in all areas of Canadian public policy.

Getting Started: Education Research Databases

The Education research databases are:

CBCA Education (use this to find Canadian education-related journal articles)
ERIC
Professional Development Collection
ProQuest Education Journals

Use these databases to find journal articles for your literature reviews for your papers and to facilitate your own research interests. The field of education is multi-disciplinary and it is often necessary for graduate students to search other subject databases found on the DATABASES list.

Thanks to the benefits of open access, more and more research funding agencies require funded researchers to make their research findings freely available online so as to maximize knowledge sharing and help advance scholarship. At the same time, academic authors would like to take advantage of open access in order to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their publications. How can researchers and authors go about doing that?

This workshop aims to help attendees learn how to ensure that their published research will be openly available online. It also provides an opportunity for a discussion of issues related to open access publishing.

Workshop Details:

Date: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Time: 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Electronic Instruction Room, The D. B. Weldon Library (on main campus)

Getting Started: The Basics of APA Tutorial

The rules of APA Style, detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, offer sound guidance for writing with simplicity, power, and concision. APA Style has been adapted by many disciplines and is used by writers around the world.

On the APA Style help pages you will find tutorials, FAQs, and other resources to help you improve your writing, master APA Style, and learn the conventions of scholarly publishing.

We recommend you spend some time with The Basics of APA Tutorial. This tutorial is designed for those who have no previous knowledge of APA Style. It shows users how to structure and format their work, recommends ways to reduce bias in language, identifies how to avoid charges of plagiarism, shows how to cite references in text, and provides selected reference examples.

"Guerrilla Librarians in Our Midst"

Smile! This is from the INSIDE HIGHER ED website (posted on Wednesday November 2, 2011). It is written by Scott McLemee:

When thinking about the future of Occupy Wall Street, there is something to say for meteorological determinism. An open-ended protest movement may grow when the weather permits, but an Arctic blast means shrinkage. OWS may bloom again in the spring, perhaps on a scale to dwarf anything that's happened so far. But when you ask people involved in the movement about what to expect in the meantime, the response can be rather evasive, and it sometimes comes with a look that says, "Have you ever tried to do anything by consensus, let alone long-term planning? Seriously, quit asking me that."

But one segment of the movement has been thinking about the cold months ahead, and even beyond that. They are the "guerrilla librarians" -- the people organizing and distributing books and periodicals to keep the demonstrators informed and entertained. A library was established in Zuccotti Park at the very start of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations, and it has received a good deal of attention. Several more sprang up as the protests spread. With the occupation movement, decentralized improvisation is the name of the game, so it's impossible to tell just how many libraries have sprung up. But they exist in Boston and Philadelphia, in Portland, Ore. and Halifax, Nova Scotia, among other places. They are staffed by a mixture of professional librarians and activist volunteers, with "stacks" created through donations from publishers, bookstores, and individuals.


You really have to read this entire article so click HERE!

"Save Library and Archives Canada"

From a CAUT news release:

The Canadian Association of University Teachers today unveiled a national campaign to protect Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

The "Save Library and Archives Canada" is being launched by CAUT in response to funding cuts and internal managerial decisions that are threatening the quality and integrity of Canada's only national public library and archives.

"Badly conceived restructuring, a narrowing of its mandate, and financial cutbacks are undermining LAC's ability to acquire, preserve and make publicly available Canada's full documentary heritage," James L. Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers said at a news conference in Ottawa today.

These changes, Turk added, have already led to a reduction in the number of specialist archivists and librarians, reduced public access and services, and the loss of rare and important materials.

Liam McGahern, president of the Antiquarian Booksellers of Canada, said a growing number of Canadian materials are not being collected by LAC because of reduced funding and a change in its acquisitions policy.

"Canadians recently lost a unique and irreplaceable set of journals chronicling late 19th Century stories of settlers and First Nations people of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Labrador Coast. This is just one of many examples," McGahern explained. "Rare military documents, sheet music, and literature that would otherwise have gone to Library and Archives Canada are quietly all slipping away."

CAUT is calling on the federal government to amend the LAC Act to ensure its mandate includes developing a comprehensive, not selective, collection of Canadian material.

"Our nation's artistic, historical, and cultural heritage is at stake," said Turk. "Genealogists, historians, researchers, graduate students, Aboriginal communities, and the general public are all affected by what is happening at LAC."

The Canadian Association of University Teachers is the national voice of 66,000 academic and general staff at 120 universities and colleges across the country.

More information on the campaign can be found at www.savelibraryarchivescanada.ca.

Symposium ~ ACADEMIC LIBRARIANSHIP - A CRISIS OR AN OPPORTUNITY?

In response to recent developments in academic libraries in Ontario and elsewhere, academic librarians are invited to gather to discuss the challenges facing the profession of academic librarianship today.

This one-day Symposium, at the University of Toronto, will serve as an opportunity to hear stakeholders' views of the profession as well as an opportunity for academic librarians to explore ways of re-affirming the legitimacy and the integrity of academic librarianship both now and as we move forward in the future.

The Symposium will be organized around three main themes: library education and curriculum, the role of professional associations and the value of professional accreditation, and labour issues.


The Symposium will be held on Friday November 18th, 2011 in Toronto.

"Western Libraries supports the University's strategic priorities - enhancing the student experience and the quality of undergraduate and graduate programs, expanding graduate enrollment, increasing research intensity and cross-disciplinary research initiatives, and taking a leadership role internationally in order to have a global impact - by providing value-added library and archival services that are relevant to a 21st century university. Western Libraries will implement strategies to achieve integration as a key partner in the academic enterprise, thereby providing appropriate and effective services to support the University's teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and administrative goals. To achieve this integration Western Libraries will focus on strategic advocacy, strengthen physical and virtual infrastructure, expand collections, and develop staff. At a more fundamental level, it will define what it means to be an academic library and deliver relevant academic library and archives services in the 21st century. Western Libraries will then take the steps necessary to achieve the required transformation to become that 21st century academic library." Read the entire Strategic Plan.

The Right to Research Coalition

The Right to Research Coalition was founded by students in the summer of 2009 to promote an open scholarly publishing system based on the belief that no student should be denied access to the articles they need because their institution cannot afford the often high cost of access. Since its launch, the Coalition has grown to represent nearly 7 million students internationally and counts among its members the largest student organizations in both the United States and Canada. While the Coalition currently has a strong base in North America, it is by no means solely a North American organization and is expanding to incorporate student organizations from around the world.

The Right to Research Coalition has released a new guide that provides (graduate) students with advice on how to choose a journal for publishing. The guide is available HERE.

On Wednesday, November 2, the Canadian Association of University Teachers will launch its national campaign: "Save Library and Archives Canada".

The campaign will expose how major restructuring of Library and Archives Canada is undermining the institution responsible for preserving Canada's history and heritage. "Library and Archives Canada is cutting services and acquisitions. Unless this is reversed, the damage to our country will be enormous," said CAUT's executive director James L. Turk.

To become fully literate in today's world, students must become proficient in the new literacies of 21st-century technologies. IRA believes that literacy educators have a responsibility to integrate information and communication technologies (ICTs) into the curriculum, to prepare students for the futures they deserve.

Since 1956, IRA has been a nonprofit, global network of individuals and institutions committed to worldwide literacy. More than 70,000 members strong, the Association supports literacy professionals through a wide range of resources, advocacy efforts, volunteerism, and professional development activities.

The Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (CRTLHE) promotes an evidence-based approach to teaching and learning in post-secondary education. Under the leadership of Debra Dawson, the current director of the Teaching Support Centre, the Centre consists of staff and faculty members from a variety of disciplinary perspectives who engage in research designed to advance the understanding and, ultimately, the practice of teaching and learning in higher education. The research focus on teaching and learning is broadly defined including both curricular and co-curricular endeavours. This expansive lens allows a comprehensive understanding of teaching and learning within the post-secondary context. Current research includes several Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) funded research projects on the impact of a variety of teaching programs involving faculty and graduate students on enhancing teaching and learning. The centre is a collaborative partnership with the Faculty of Education.

Scholarship@Western

Scholarship@Western collects, disseminates, archives, and preserves a variety of materials created or sponsored by The University of Western Ontario community. It aims to facilitate knowledge sharing by providing open access to the academic and professional achievements at Western.

ACCESS COPYRIGHT MEMORANDUM from Janice M. Deakin (September 1, 2011)

Here is the memo about Access Copyright from Janice M. Deakin, Provost & Vice President (Academic) dated September 1st, 2011:

The University of Western Ontario is committed to ensuring that copyright issues are dealt with in a fair and balanced way that respects both users' and creators' rights, while recognizing the University's legal obligations and the need for faculty, staff and students to have full access to all the resources that support their work, research and study.


To this end, Western has relied on a licence agreement with Access Copyright. Unfortunately, Access Copyright's decision to seek a fundamental change in the way it deals with licensing works to universities, including a substantial (in the range of 300%) increase in the fees it charges and a more invasive monitoring of copying practices, has caused higher education institutions across Canada, including Western, to rethink their relationship with Access Copyright.


AUCC is currently involved in proceedings before the Copyright Board of Canada that we hope will result in the imposition of a tariff structure that is fair and properly reflects the realities of modern post secondary education. Unfortunately that process is lengthy and the ultimate result is uncertain. As a result universities have been left in a very difficult position.


Some universities have decided to completely sever their relationship with Access Copyright. Others have decided to continue on an interim basis. The situation at each university is different and reflects many different factors. Earlier this year I asked a working group to provide me with recommendations as to how Western could operate outside of the Access Copyright tariff. That working group has made some excellent draft recommendations and is continuing its work. In reviewing those recommendations, I have determined that there is simply not enough time to implement them for this academic year in a way that would not have an adverse effect on faculty and students, and potentially on the operations of the University. For that reason I have decided that Western will not opt out of the Access Copyright Interim Tariff for the 2011-12 academic year.

We expect that there will be further developments relating to these issues over the next few months, and we will continue to work to find solutions that provide Western with the maximum flexibility in responding to these developments and that are consistent with best serving the interests of our students, faculty and staff.

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

RefWorks 2.0

The web interface for RefWorks has been updated to a fresher, more interactive format: RefWorks 2.0. If you are using "RefWorks Classic", with the red and grey interface, it's time to update!

After you log in to RefWorks, look in the upper right corner of the page for the "RefWorks 2.0" link. Click on it, and you will immediately be switched to RefWorks 2.0. All of your references, folders, and preferences will be automatically converted: you won't lose anything.

The RefWorks Classic interface is being discontinued, and all users will be converted to RefWorks 2.0 in early August.

Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education

These STANDARDS were approved by the ACRL Board of Directors at the Spring Executive Committee Meeting May 11, 2011.

Introduction:

The quickly changing information and technology landscape requires increasingly sophisticated information literacy skills for the navigation, evaluation, and use of information (Jenkins, 2006). Teachers play a key role in providing students with diverse opportunities to learn how to use information wisely.


Those preparing to become pre-kindergarten to twelfth grade (PK-12) teachers require a comprehensive understanding of information literacy to guide their own knowledge creation activities that will ultimately affect their future students. Yet, researchers have shown that future teachers often enter teaching without the necessary information literacy skills and knowledge (Laverty & Reed, 2006).

Experiences in pre-service, graduate, and continuing education programs shape how teachers model and facilitate student learning in their own classrooms. The development of information literacy tools and knowledge is fundamental to teacher education students' abilities to evaluate and use diverse and continually changing information sources in their academic work and pre-service teaching.

Once in their own classrooms, PK-12 teachers model for their students how to critically navigate the current maze of information and how to use information to construct credible arguments. Information literacy competence enables pre-service teachers to develop a robust understanding of the role of information in their lives, and to model information literacy to PK-12 students.

This article appears in the Summer 2011 issue of Childhood Education (Volume 87, Number 4).

From the introductory paragraphs of the report:


According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 47 million people living in the United States spoke a language other than English at home in 2000, representing approximately 18% of the total U.S. population (NCES, 2004). It is expected that these demographics will continue to change, and minorities will become the majority by 2030 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009). Of special interest is the fact that the population of English language learners (ELLs), especially those who are learning English in K-12 school settings, will continue to grow (Chang, 2008). According to an "Issue Brief" by the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF), about 20% of students were identified as an ELL in 2007, and a quarter of those students have difficulty with English (AYPF, 2009). A recent report from the Census Bureau (2009) suggests that one in every four children under the age of 5 in the United States is currently being raised in a home where a language other than English is being spoken.


The major concern of educators who work with ELLs is that these children face many difficulties when entering the U.S. public education system. More specifically, these children tend to fall behind their mainstream counterparts in science, reading, and mathematics (NCES, 2003; U.S. Department of Education, 2001). A vast amount of research conducted in the area identifies several factors associated with ELL underachievement (Capps et al., 2006; Chang, 2008). For instance, sociolinguists have confirmed that ELLs experience difficulties learning a new language and a new set of cultural norms, resulting in poor academic performance (Teranishi, 2004). Mathematics is one of the critical areas in which ELLs have language-associated learning difficulties (Lee & Jung, 2004; Veel, 1999).

From the News Release:

The simple message for Ontario certified teachers is this: "Represent yourself in social media the same way you would in person,'' says College of Teachers Registrar Michael Salvatori, OCT of a professional advisory to the College's 230,000 members.

The advisory offers advice to teachers on how best to use electronic communication and social media with students. It encourages the use of social media as a teaching tool but cautions teachers to be careful when using sites like Facebook.

"In the current education milieu, e-communication and social media do and will continue to offer engaging and exciting teaching and learning experiences for students and teachers. Their use should be encouraged," says the Registrar. "We want to alert members to its potential risks and provide guidance for its responsible, professional use."

The teaching profession's ethical standards and standards of practice provide the foundation for the College's advice.

"Our advice to teachers is to keep ethical standards - care, trust, respect and integrity - in line of sight," says College Chair Liz Papadopoulos, OCT. "As teachers and educators, we model professionalism and responsibility for our students in both the real world and the virtual world."

It's the College's role as a professional regulator to provide advice to its members from time to time on emerging issues or in response to member questions on aspects of teaching that will continue to advance the profession and the public's confidence in it.

More information: Backgrounder, Advisory on the Use of Electronic Communication and Social Media, Video (incorporates clips from teachers and social media experts)

The Report Card on Ontario's Secondary Schools 2011 collects a variety of relevant, objective indicators of school performance into one, easily accessible public document so that anyone can analyze and compare the performance of individual schools. By doing so, the Report Card assists parents when they choose a school for their children and encourages and assists all those seeking to improve their schools.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the Research category.

Reports is the previous category.

Research Support is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

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